Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. OSU

    OSU Adventurer

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    hey guys what tail rack should I get thats light and functional to strap on a duffle bag and what do you guys use to protect your aftermarket exhaust from damage I wish they had a plastic kit what wraps around the pipe like a mx bike. Also a little off topic but I cam across this new KTM E bike its interesting to see one in action.

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  2. OSU

    OSU Adventurer

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    hahaha
  3. skierd

    skierd Wannabe Far-Rider

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    *nerd alert* Is it just me, or does the Freeride E kinda sound like the dementors from Harry Potter?

    Cool bikes, I'll keep my gasoline for now but very very cool bikes.
  4. jeickerman

    jeickerman Full of it.

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    They sound like slot cars. No thank you. KTM 990s sound wonderful, however. :D

    John
  5. cug

    cug --

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    Tire mounting question again: Tonight I tried for the first time and got the front D606 on. What a f****** nightmare ... The tire irons I have are too short and I really wrestled the thing on. Nearly broke my fingers getting the valve stem through the rim hole.

    Now, is the D606 bead supposed to "pop" on the rim when I put air in? I couldn't get it to pop with my (large) manual pump.

    For now I only know this: I will bring rear rim and tire to the shop and have them mount the thing. I'm done trying this without proper tools. Spooning the front on was bad enough, I won't even try the rear with the tools I have.
  6. skierd

    skierd Wannabe Far-Rider

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    Did you make sure to have the bead of the tire in the dish of the rim? I've done all but one change with 8" irons, you really don't need all that much leverage, if the opposite part of the bead is down in the dish it should mostly slide on easy peazy . The valve stem you just get used to doing I guess. If anything the rear tire is easier imo...

    My dirt tires sometimes popped and sometimes didn't but still snuck onto the bead seat just fine using a mountain bike pump.
  7. cug

    cug --

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    Couldn't really get it there with no leverage as I had no real handle on the thing. Easy peazy is definitely not the word I would use. I was sweating like crazy when I had that thing on. Bad technique, I know.

    Nevertheless, I'll go to the shop on the weekend and have them mount the rear and check the front. I'm not in the mood of trying the rear. There are so many other things I need to install to get ready for my trip that I don't want to waste another two hours to wrestle the rear on.
  8. Dahveed

    Dahveed Sumo Biker!

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    Practice makes perfect. My first tire change was also much tougher than I expected. But the experience paid off the day I had 3 flats on the same tire.
    This doodad makes it easier to get the valve stem in the hole.

    I use a small compressor at home. You might have to over inflate the tires to get the bead to set right.

    Make sure the tire is pushed into the depression on the center of the rim. Did you use tire lube (aka soapy water)?

    You tube has many videos of guys changing dirt bike tires. The dunlop videos seem to be the best. Its about 4 minutes to get the old tire off and 4 minutes to get the new tire on.
  9. duanew1

    duanew1 In my Pajama pants

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    Yes this works great to get the tire off but think that there is a better way to put on the first bead. I saw this in a video once and it works great. If the rim is elevated, put a little lube on the bead and hook one side in the well of the rim. Next alternate left and right pushing down and the tire usually slides on no irons required.
  10. Dahveed

    Dahveed Sumo Biker!

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    Here are the videos I mentioned before. This guy changes a lot of tires, so he makes it look easy. But it still should be doable in an hour a wheel. Oh, and don't wear a white shirt. The wheels he's working on are very clean. Yours aren't.

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  11. Pantah

    Pantah PJ Fan from Boston

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    Neduro's Tire Changing Class:

    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717&highlight=Neduro+tire+changing

    After years of poor success spooning tires, I read this thread back when I first bought my 950 in 2005. Then I went out and practiced pulling tubes in the comfort of my barn until I got it right. The reason I went to all this work is because I was going to run a 5000 mile event that would require me to change tires by hand. The change took place in a gravel parking lot in the Yukon. After I changed mine, I was invited to change a couple others!

    Dang, I felt like a rock star :queenie

    If you take your time, use a little soap (WD40 works), and are careful to use all the well, there should be no struggling. If you are using a lot of force, you're not doing it right. I use 8 inch spoons from Motion Pro. I have a 13 inch spoon as well, but I don't need it.

    I generally need about 50 lbs of air pressure to pop the rear bead, which is a big tire. The front doesn't take much, though. A squirt of WD40 is handy. I'm sure this thread is full of contributors that spoon tires routinely.

    I apologize if this is a 205
  12. sTE610vE

    sTE610vE Long timer

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    Yes it does vary with the tire putting it back on. On tires that aren't super stiff I put the on from the same side like you describe most of the time you're correct.

    And like I said before a 5 gallon bucket with the wheel sitting on the open end makes it so much easier. :D
  13. MoBill

    MoBill Smiles when says dat

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  14. herods_flu

    herods_flu Been here awhile

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    To get the bead to seat I ended up spraying soapy water all the way around both sides and just kept putting air in it until it looked right. I couldn't get it without the soapy water allowing the bead to slide up. I also found the rear quite a bit harder than the front.
  15. RichardU

    RichardU Let's Ride

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    I always put the tube into the tire first. And when I install the tire, the valve stem goes in first. Easy. I've changed 40-50 tires that way and haven't pinched a tube yet.
  16. GSBS

    GSBS FunHog

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    ...Link here.

    Will pay for itself in band-aids for knuckles after a couple of rigid sidewall knobbies: :nod

    [​IMG]
  17. Crawdaddy

    Crawdaddy Navigate 2 Adventure

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    Snapped it the first time I went to use it.......P.O.S. tool in my opinion........put the tube in the tire first :wink:

    My new single track weapon (300 XC-W) has the Tubliss system.......so now I'm just carrying plugs when riding that bike, but still using Bridgestone Ultra Heavy Duty tubes in the WR250R.....2 flats in 12K miles at low pressures (~10 PSI)....

  18. GSBS

    GSBS FunHog

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    Hmmm... How hard are you pulling on that steel cable? Been using mine for over three years - couple times a month on my bikes and on others' tires we change here - never a problem.
  19. rydnseek

    rydnseek reluctant poster

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    I just changed out 2 rear tires on my x.. both knobbies. I saw those videos a few years back & have incorporated several of the techniques in my own. I don't have the nice stand, so i end up doing it on the ground or floor. But here are important details in changing. I got both of mine on at Tom's a couple of weeks back in less than an hour total.

    1. Warm the tires. It was a sunny day, so i set both of the tires in the back of my truck in the sun to prewarm them. I've also put them in front of a radiant heater to warm them up. ..makes it a lot easier to handle.

    2. Some air in the tubes. Like Doug's video, a little air in the tube makes getting the valve stem in a lot easier.

    3. Powder in the tire & tube. I just sprinkle baby powder inside the tire, then rotate it around a bit to spread it out. I usually do it after one bead is on the rim.

    4. Get the bead down in the wheel. If the bead hangs up on the rim, it will be impossible to spoon it on. You have to be sure the bead is down inside the wheel well. ..both sides.

    5. I don't soap the whole rim, but only the last foot or so as i spoon it on. It lets the tire hold on the rim without the bead buddy. I got a bead buddy a couple of years ago & used it, but i don't have one on the trail, & I also like alternate solutions.. I push the tire on & spoon a couple of sections until it starts to get hard. Then i spray on the window cleaner, spoon the rest, done. It's probably better to lube the whole rim.. it seats a little better that way.

    6. Doug did not break the bead on my shinkos. They are a very stiff bead & sidewall & took me a lot of time to break, with my full body weight & some hammering on the tire. I took the tire spoons & pushed the bead down, & hit the sidewalls with a 2# hammer while applying pressure. Some time it takes 2 spoons & moving it around. Breaking the bead is the toughest part on some of the stiff rear tires. I'd like to see him break a bead on a teraflex with his fingers!

    7. Pay attention to the details. When learning a new skill, it is the details we often miss when doing it. Those techniques make a difference in easy or hard.

    8. On the trail, a bit of water will do for rim lube. Few of us carry windex. A small can of wd40 is a good idea.. i have one when travelling, for cleaning the chain. That would also work for lubing the rim.
  20. cug

    cug --

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    Okay, listing my mistakes:

    It was a cool day, no sun available anymore, no heater available. Tire was really stiff (D606).

    Didn't even know that one.

    I guess that was the main problem. The tire was so stiff, I couldn't get it in there, so it was probably sitting at the side of the rim (also why it didn't pop on).

    Of course.

    Maybe I give the rear a try on Saturday or Sunday if it is sunny and I can warm it up outside. Will also try to get all the other things right then.

    It also seems to me that the front might be real hard because it the rim is so narrow and the tire so stiff that it's hard to push the bead into the middle of the rim.

    Thanks for all the hints.