Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. byron555

    byron555 Lame Duck Adventurer

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    To get a good price on a used WRr find a PO that completely screwed up the settings on the bike :D:D:D:D:D

    No wonder Honda's new CRF is devoid of all this... they expect a large portion of sales going to this crowd. I would be willing to bet that a good portion of people that sold WRr's barely used expected them to be more idiot proof more entry level Honda'ish... Not that the WRr is a KTM, but it is more like a KTM than the other Japanese Dual Sports.

    I'm sure these same owners could completely screw up a KTM suspension too
  2. coresports

    coresports coresports

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    i went from an xt225 to a brand new 08 wrr and i thought (at first) it was a dog and regretted making the switch... your bike is not even broken-in yet, mine was REALLY tight (motor-wise) until i hit 1,000 miles or so then it really got loose and rev'd like i thought it should. i would grab a manual off the 'net if you don't have one already, set ALL of your suspension settings back to stock if they are not (just to get a baseline for you). after that, ride it like you stole it, ie: rev the crap out of it! you may just need some more seat time after that just to get used to it, these are 2 totally different bikes with different motors & suspensions, frame, ect. if the PO mucked with other stuff too, ie: lowered the rear suspension w/out lowering the front, ect. you may still need to tweak it but you will be happy in the end, hang in there! these bikes track like they are on rails (for a DS) super stable. i can't imagine how far behind anyone on an xt225 would be vs this bike on the street and in the trails and woops (nice suspension upgrade from an xt).
  3. DougZ73

    DougZ73 Fading off.........

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    Its also a matter of knowing how to ride the bike you own. I came to the WRR from a DRZ 400. The DRZ has/had so much more lower end power, it was a big adjustment. Once you get used to where the "powerband" of the bike is, and learn to ride in it, the WRR is fine. Typically, "thumpers" make their power down lo, so again, it takes getting used to revving the thing(WRR) a lot.

    I used to ride a GSXR 600 on the track, as my track bike, and ride an SV1000 on the street. Both bikes have about 110 HP's, but one is an RPM bike and the other is a torque bike, and you ride them totally differently.
  4. fred flintstone

    fred flintstone Been here awhile

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    Almost every used bike I have ever bought that had something adjustable, it has been adjusted wrong or poorly. Worst seems to be always suspension, if it has a knob to turn PO invariably turns it as stiff as it can go. No doubt to reflect his extreme requirements or whatever, I don't know. I had thought modern fuel injection was idiot-proof but I guess I was wrong.
  5. sturgeon

    sturgeon Been here awhile

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    Or, more likely, not suited to you and your riding conditions. Just as your settings wouldn't likely suit me any better than the factory settings did.
  6. pfy50

    pfy50 Professional nOOb

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    Hey Fisherman,

    This what I wrote over on the WRR/X forum:

    Just got back from running 2 test runs on the WRR. First test was I upped the 5th place digit from 4 to 6 as you suggested(motokid: ID). No difference what so ever from my limited 15 mile loop which included curves, hills and straights. Only when I got going down a long steep hill could I even briefly see 84mph and 10,000rpm. On the flats I had trouble maintaining 69-71mph @ around 78-8100rpm. I even looked at the filter as suggested over on the ADVrider forum; (it was fairly clean) so I removed it for 2nd run, and was able to get it to rev a little freer, but not much more W.O.T. response. Tomorrow I will have to remove the programmer and try another run to see what effect it has. Do you have any other suggestions to try, I don't want to have the bike down for any length of time as this is a primo time of the year for me for riding.:ear
  7. byron555

    byron555 Lame Duck Adventurer

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    My old xr650L was a flood salvage, only required a carb cleaning, battery and engine flush to get running. Anyway, the suspension was pretty good when I got it, I never adjusted the dampening at all, only the preload. Best $525 I ever spent.

    The WR had forks set different from each other (near max rebound), and the shock was set at near full compression and no rebound when my dad bought it and the PO lost the manual to dial in the stock settings. The rear was lowered and so was the front end, but the front was lowered too much. On trails the rear end was all over the place.... PO: "I tuned the suspension for better handling" .... That is what my dad told me.

    Not trying to bash on Honda dual sports, my dad has a crf230L as well, and the suspension works well from factory for a wide variety of riders under 190 lbs and not too aggressive. I am too heavy for it combined with slightly too aggressive, but it handled washboards etc better than the WR when we first bought the WR.
  8. NL-Patrick

    NL-Patrick Adventurer

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    Next to safaritanks and IMS are there anymore that produce extra large fuel tanks?

    Gr Patrick
  9. jefmad

    jefmad Been here awhile

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    Those are the only two for the WR250R/X.
  10. Ronin ADV

    Ronin ADV Gear addict

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    Dont forget Rotopax. :lol3
    Joking aside I put the 3.7 Safari on a little while back and I love that tank. Great range, protects the radiator, and I can look down at it and instantly know how much fuel I have left (I got the translucent one). I have not noted any significant change in handling of the bike with the bigger tank either.
  11. flatboarder

    flatboarder Been here awhile

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    Nothing on this planet is idiot proof. It just takes a better idiot in case.
    As soon as one starts to fiddle with the stock controller or an aftermarket controller or whatever without using professional equipment to fine tune settings for *every* riding condition, this is a dangerous and error prone procedure. Just throwing in some mods "everyone does" and connecting some controller with some friends map will certainly not work out of the box, might destroy the engine (which actually is pretty undestructible) and cannot be blamed on "modern fuel injection".

    Professionals take lots of money to adjust a fuel controller for a specific bike. At least over here this is a real expensive task.

    BTW my WR250R has been working flawlessly for 31.000km now. Not one single issue, no matter where or at what conditions I rode. Engine, injection, fuel pump, fuel consumption, everything is just fine like on the first day. And this is the reason why I will not spend one single thought on changing this, poking into the diag mode, deactivating any peripheral controls or whatever. What for?
    Regards, Phil
  12. fred flintstone

    fred flintstone Been here awhile

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    I am not sure how maxing out rebound compression and preload plus setting CO to 6 would be proper for anyone's conditions, but I see your point. A 1150 GSA I bought from a guy barely over 5 ft tall who never took it off road had done the same thing to the suspension, and then got a lowered seat for it because it was "too tall". Etc. etc. If there is a knob people tend to want to turn it, often to 11 it seems.
  13. TBird1

    TBird1 Adventurer

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    AMEN, brother! I love the 70 MPG. Why screw with that? I also like the fact that the exhaust doesn't choke me like that from my older street-only bike. Clean emissions DO count for something. I only wish they provided the O2 sensor for "closed-loop" operation like the non-USA models.
  14. DougZ73

    DougZ73 Fading off.........

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    Just so its clear, there is rebound damping, and compression damping, and they are two different things.
  15. fred flintstone

    fred flintstone Been here awhile

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    Thanks, yes I am aware of that. Suspension tuning is a black art.

    edit: The other thing the PO had done that I did not like so much but came to like later was he put on over-sized Maxxis Desert IT tires (140's in back and very tall). So maybe he was tweaking damping to try to match those tires, which only seem to work well at relatively low pressures, so that the tall/soft sidewall do most of the work. Still not sure what the CO set at 6 was for.

    Anyway SOP for me now is, on a used bike when something is adjustable, set it back to factory spec where possible and then go from there. With the CO it was not immediately apparent it had been messed with, nor did I know that was possible until I read about it here.
  16. flatboarder

    flatboarder Been here awhile

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    The key to successfully using stock suspension in my case was to understand that adjusting of rebound and compression damping are not at all independent from each other. For me it was required to find my optimum settings by adjusting both of them and analysing the result.
    However, I have a simple use case: better on road with supermoto wheels and lowered/shortened stock rear shock vs. better at offroad with enduro wheels and long rear shock.
    I was not at all lucky just changing rebound settings for instance.
    I had to combine rebound and compression settings until I had found a way it would fit for myself. And that worked out. No racetrack settings, for sure, but perfectly ok for road usage in my case.
    Regards, Phil
  17. EEKAMOUSE

    EEKAMOUSE Been here awhile

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    Has anyone installed a manual cam chain tensioner on this bile yet and if so where can I find the info on this. Thx for the help in advance!
  18. fred flintstone

    fred flintstone Been here awhile

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    FWIW on this bike with the big tires it seems the following in order of influence on handling feel (subjective of course, plus I am not very aggressive off road)

    1. Tire pressures
    2. Ride height & F/R balance (rear tire is relatively very tall). Bike sat ass-up nose-down with the big rear, more level it is much better for my needs
    3. Sag
    4. Damping (R & C)

    I think I have 1-3 set somewhere near OK, now working on 4. On vs off road mainly tire pressure is what I'm messing with at this point.

    I come from a car road racing background, and worked in the suspension field for a long time. New to bike suspension though. Whole different world esp dirt/off road stuff.
  19. sodapop

    sodapop Caffeinated

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    Hi,

    After reading a lot of this thread, I bought a 2008 WR250R with about 6600 miles on it and no engine mods. Happy to join you all. I put on a new front D606F tire and went on my first dual sport ride yesterday. Like a dumbass, I made a sharp turn in the parking lot before the ride and lost the front end. I forgot about the mold release compound on the tire. It was a slow speed lowside and scratched up the hand guard, the rear rack, and the Flatland skid plate. Anyway, a few miles down the road we stopped to regroup and I noticed a new whirring sound when I lightly blipped the throttle in neutral. It isn't really loud, but it's there, and you hear it mostly when the RPMs decrease. It's a "whir" and not a grinding sound. As best I can tell it's coming from near the clutch or the transmission.

    The bike ran OK, but we did a trail section and coming down a hill with the clutch in, the engine just died. I was able to restart it with the starter before climbing back up the other side and it seemed to run fine the rest of the ride. I put about 200 miles on the bike yesterday including some long WOT highway sections with no other issues.

    The other thing I screwed up, and I'll mention it just in case it might be related, is the chain. The bike has a 14/48 sprocket set on it. I took off the Sandman case saver and counter shaft cover before the ride to clean out some gunk and to move the shifter up a notch. When I put it back on, I neglected to wedge the case saver far enough toward the cases and it was apparently rubbing the chain. At the end of the ride I noticed the outside edge of the chain was newly polished. The front sprocket has a funky polish on the outside edge of every other tooth. I took the Sandman stuff off last night and there is a gouge worn in the case saver and a deep gouge in the lower cylindrical support. The chain is a Primary Drive with about 6K on it.

    I know it's not a lot to go on, but has anyone experienced a weird "whirring" sound and have an idea of the cause?

    Thanks.
  20. what broke now

    what broke now Petroleum Brother

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    I would check the skidplate first. Is it properly fastened, etc? Maybe remove it and see if the noise goes away. Plates can both reflect noise upward, and can also harmonically create their own tones. If it bent at all, it might change the general sound of the bike some.