Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. coresports

    coresports coresports

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Oddometer:
    352
    +1

    congrats on the purchase and welcome!
  2. jckid

    jckid Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    325
    Location:
    CA
    I just moved from a Husky SM610 to a WR250X, and I wanted to take the WR on an overnighter to get the feel of how it's going to be to travel on it. Most of our trips are in the spring and summer, so with winter fast approaching I was anxious to squeeze in a quick trial run. I haven't done my seat yet (Renazco appt. set for January), so to save myself a little misery, this ride was only about 110 miles each day. On our normal travels, we ride up to 300 miles a day.

    Here's a couple pics from the trip:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It ended up being a great trial run. All of my luggage transferred nicely from the Husky to the WR. The ride included mostly twisty mountain roads, about 10 miles of four-lane freeway, and about 50 miles on a straight, fast, busy two-lane highway. We also encountered winds up to 30mph. The bike handled it all with ease, although in the wind it was affected slightly more than my heavier Husky, but not as bad as my KLX with knobbies. I found the bike perfectly comfortable cruising at a GPS verified 65. We usually only cruise around 60, so it will be more than adequate for me. In 32 degree weather I discovered that the bike is just a bit cold blooded. I took off with three other riders watching me in a lurchy, jerky sort of way, as a result of it not being warmed up. :lol3 I will let it warm up for a minute next time in cold weather. And the distance worked out well, given the stock seat. 100 miles/day is about my limit. :huh I can't wait to get the seat done! Anyway, I think it's a great bike, and it's going to work out just fine for traveling for me. I can't wait to head out on a longer trip come springtime.
  3. scottmac

    scottmac Long timer

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,038
    Location:
    La Selva Beach, CA.
    Did you head up into the Sierras on your trip?

    We're doing a trip up to the Markleeville area at the end of next week and are
    planning on it being cold at nights, low 30's - upper 20's.
  4. flatboarder

    flatboarder Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    Austria/Europe
    I did 500km a day several times with the stock seat without problems. A matter of using appropriate textile wear for me. One of our trips was through parts of northern Italy.
    Regards, Phil
  5. jckid

    jckid Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    325
    Location:
    CA
    Yes, although we were farther south than Markleeville. I think your nighttime temp prediction is spot on. Have a great trip. We rode Sonora Pass two years ago and Ebbetts pass three months ago...beautiful area.
  6. sequent

    sequent South Australia's own....

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Oddometer:
    480
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    Ha, I shouldn't get too cocky about the class win, I was the only one dumb enough to enter a 250cc bike, so all I really had to do was finish. Did beat a few Berg 570s though, so that was good..!!!

    I ran Michelin AC10s front and rear, with a Michelin Enduro front mousse and a Michelin Desert mousse rear. I cut both the mousse(s?) down to lower the simulated pressure, and to fit the rear desert mousse (which is a 140/80) into the AC10 rear (which was a 110/100). Seemed to work well, and there were many stages of the rally that I was glad I wasn't running tubes. I would run the same tyres again, no worries. The one set of tyres got me through the whole event (although the rear was buggered by the end of the rally, and could have done with a change halfway through). That's 3,500km (around 2,000 miles) of hard sand and rock racing over seven days, so not too bad.

    I took the bike to Hoey Racing Services, near my place in Adelaide, Australia, and he resprung and revalved it to suit the weight of me (100kg with gear) and all the bits and pieces on the bike. It was seriously the best modification I did. I wound the rebound off the shock slightly and that was the only suspension change I made for the whole event, it was great.

    As for other mods to the bike, here's the list:
    - 28mm dia handlebars plus a Scotts steering damper set-up
    - Barkbuster Storm handguards
    - A full FMF header/exhaust with the FMF fuel programmer
    - Removed the EXUP and AIS/ICS systems
    - B&B bashplate, master cylinder, tail tidy and rear disc guard
    - Force radiator guard
    - Flatland front disc guard
    - Pivot Pegz
    - Sandman case caver and countershaft sprocket cover
    - RAD Manufacturing front and rear hubs with Excel rims and stainless heavy duty spokes
    - Chaingang sprockets (49 rear and a 13 front. I have ordered a 46 rear, which would make a better compromise I reckon)
    - HEL braided front and rear brake lines
    - Twinair air filters
    - Hammerhead +20mm WR250F gearshift lever
    - Seat Concepts low seat
    - 14 litre Safari tank.
    - A high-impact "Screens For Bikes" screen kit
    - Acerbis folding mirrors
    - Brake snake
    - Nomad 4 litre rear tank
    - Ariete foam rally grips
    - Shorei lithium battery (saves 1.5kg over the stock Yuasa battery!)
    - Replaced the stock sidestand with a WR250F alloy sidestand (just need to cut the lug off the WR250F sidestand and use a WR250F spring - saves around 500g).
    - Home-fabricated brackets to increase the gap between the screen and the instruments so the front brake line wouldn't snag
    - All the usual rally navigation gear (F2R roadbook plus Touratech IMO and Trailtech Vector tripmeters mounted to a Rally Management Services nav gear bracket plus associated hand controls)
  7. Llamaha

    Llamaha Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Oddometer:
    853
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Which nomad tank did you use, also was it easy to install?
  8. sequent

    sequent South Australia's own....

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Oddometer:
    480
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    I ran just the standard No.1 tank from Nomad (see http://nomadtanks.com.au/Tanks.php). It fits nicely on the rear guard right behind the seat. The tanks comes with the option to bolt it to the guard, but I chose to just use the supplied 15" rubber tie-down straps, looping onto the subframe just below the seat and attaching to the B&B numberplate mount holes at the rear so I could remove it for the shorter stages and just run it when I thought I might need it (basically any stage that was over 200km between refuels). The tank comes with a foam pad which increases the gap between the tank and the exhaust, but this worked its way out and is lost somewhere in the Western Australian outback, but there was never an issue with the tank and the exhaust even with no foam. At the next service point I glued some high density foam to the rear guard instead and this worked very well and lasted the distance - the tank didn't move an inch during the whole event. I didn't plumb the tank into the main tank, so I had to stop and transfer fuel, but in the context of the whole rally, losing three minutes on two stages wasn't a big deal, and saved any potential problems with the fuel pump pulling air when the rear tank emptied etc etc. Could probably plumb it into the main system with a little thought, but as I said, I didn't bother.
  9. Gany

    Gany Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    369
    Location:
    Melbourne, Au
    Awesome Dave and thanks for all the info. Looking into the pivot levers now. Any more pics of the bike and some in action?
  10. sequent

    sequent South Australia's own....

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Oddometer:
    480
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    A few more photos courtesy of Ross (ADV name Sylvia) at rbimage.net, who tirelessly followed the event, snapping away.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  11. Joe Watson

    Joe Watson Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,034
    Location:
    Sunshine Coast, Qld, Aus.
    Good on ya mate!!! Bloody brilliant effort! I have just got back from Cape York on my WRR and was so keen to see how you went. Congrats on the finish, one day, I hope to have one of those finishers medals in my hand!!
  12. coresports

    coresports coresports

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Oddometer:
    352
    fyi, mine was set to kmh and not mph from the factory, i drove around the first day amazed at how fast & far i was going until i noticed. :rofl

    a quick google calc shows:

    115 km per hour
    = 71.5 mph guessing that how fast the po was really going

    i had to look in the manual to figure out how to change it:

    press the SELECT 2” button until the display changes after the main switch is turned to “ON”.



  13. pfy50

    pfy50 Professional nOOb

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    591
    Location:
    Oneida, Tenn.
    sodapop,

    Just addressing the engine dying problem. Do you use predominately ethanol laced gas? I had this problem with my KTM. The dealer mechanic told me that the alcohol causes a film to build up inside the injectors and at low speed and at idle the injectors get starved of fuel enough that it causes your bike to just die. At higher speeds your injector(s) are still getting enough fuel to keep the bike going, but eventually the film will just starve the engine enough so that you will not be able keep it going(this is where I noticed the problem). I do not know why this doesn't happen to all bikes or with certain bikes (BMW's seem to be prone to it) more than others. May be type of driving and where you get your fuel that has some determining factor (or injector design). After I got the injectors flushed out with a high pressure solvent it seemed to take care of the problem(something to keep watch on). I did 26,000 miles in a 5 month trip on the new KTM with no apparent problem. The problem didn't show up until I had near 40,000. May be something to look into.:wink:
  14. NL-Patrick

    NL-Patrick Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2011
    Oddometer:
    60
    Location:
    Holland
    Pimp my ride has begun ........

    Handlebar risers 3cm :clap

    Handlebar crash pad from Renthal :muutt

    TV set :D

    Gr Patrick

    [​IMG]
  15. Crawdaddy

    Crawdaddy Navigate 2 Adventure

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,283
    Location:
    Ramona, CA.
  16. Lima Tango

    Lima Tango Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    66
    Location:
    Morgan Hill, CA
    Please excuse my cluelesness, but I was wondering...

    The 3.1 IMS fuel tank for the wrr has a vent tube sticking out of the cap. What is this for? Why doesn't the stock tank have this? My wrr is a California model if it matters.

    thanks!
  17. jckid

    jckid Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    325
    Location:
    CA
    I want to add a power outlet so I can run a heated vest during the winter. Is there a kit available that comes with everything I would need? And is there a write-up anywhere with step by step instructions on how to do the install? I've found lots of info on how people accomplish this, but nothing that has complete instructions on how to do it. My hubby and I have completely wired two bikes with Baja Designs dual-sport kits, and it was easy, but that was because we had step by step instructions. We've also wired accessories on my Jeep, but again, with instructions.
  18. jckid

    jckid Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    325
    Location:
    CA
    CA models vent through the smog equipment--charcoal can. My KLX is the same way. When I put an IMS tank on it, I removed the smog equipment, so now it vents through the gas cap that came with the IMS tank.
  19. what broke now

    what broke now Petroleum Brother

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,508
    Location:
    seattle
    If you use a battery tender, you can use the same pigtail on the bike to power the vest while riding. Just make up an sae to gerbing [or other] adapter, assuming you know how to solder and use shrink tubing.
    I am sure there are kits to get as fancy as you want, also.
  20. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,704
    Location:
    Collingwood, Ontario
    Some good info here:

    http://www.basherdesigns.com/2010/01/29/3cs-part-1/