Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

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    This is a follow up for yesterday's post. I got my new part in today, and started cleaning the rear suspension.

    Why Yamaha calls it a Seal Guard is beyond me, since this really is a chain slider of sorts. Names aside, the following pictures are the new part, side to side with the part that has 5387 miles on it. Needless to say, the wear is unacceptable and I will be keeping an eye on the wear once I install my larger sprockets (front/rear). My simple understanding of geometry tells me the chain should not come in contact with the seal guard as often with larger diameter sprockets, bu we shall see, since Yamaha's design puts the pivot point for the swingarm off center, thus creating inevitable wear on the seal guard.

    [​IMG]

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    I could really use torque specs for the whole rear suspension, if someone has those.

    Thanks
  2. AZ TOM

    AZ TOM Long timer

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    Same tube, it's been so long I can't remember but it came with handguards so tube was already cut.
  3. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman PROUD 2B Riff Raff!

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    Drinking from the Stanley Cup!
    Hot Grips heated grips :nod ala Big Dog, best grips ever and being as big as they are they really reduce hand fatigue for me.

    From Marks web page...

    http://bigdogadventures.com/WR250R.htm

    model #475-875 which are 4 3/4" in length--be sure and order their epoxy to
    glue them on as ordinary quick set epoxy won't hold up.
    About $130 and available
    Here

    Love them.
  4. duanew1

    duanew1 In my Pajama pants

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    I case you did not realize it, you do not have to take any suspension components off to replace the seal guard. You don't even have to take off the kickstand bracket but it makes it easier.
  5. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

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    I know that I don't have to take it apart to replace the seal guard. I made the CHOICE to take it apart, completely, based on the lack of care regarding the seal guard by the PO. It never hurts to clean and lube the needle bearings, shafts, sleeves, and all that. Why not do it when I already have the wheel off and I'm there anyway? Might as well make sure all works as intended, is clean and sealed, and coat bearings and pivot points in waterproof grease.

    Oh, I did not take the kickstand off to take the swingarm and linkage apart :lol3

    I also want to make sure that all of the old grease with sand in it (read lapping compound) is gone before I install new chain, sprockets, and sliders. But that's just me, trying to do things the right way.
  6. Sewerat

    Sewerat Cert. bike whore

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    It's a good idea to give the swing arm a once over anyways. But I'd also say that the po might not be lack of maintenance. Tht old slide looked gummed up with lots of oil, lube of some sort. I always have a spare seal in my inventory for the bike as they seem to just disintegrate whenever they feel like it???
  7. henrymartin

    henrymartin Mr. Tourguide

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    Yes, the old slide is gummed up with some heavy lube, and the case saver / sprocket cover was completely clogged with lube and sand. Those spots should be cleaned every now and then, if not the resulting lapping compound shortens the life of chain, sprockets, and sliders.
    The reason why I mentioned probable lack of maintenance, is because there were other things as well - such as misaligned rear wheel, loose axle nuts...
  8. cjbiker

    cjbiker Nobody's Robot

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    It's too bad that TM Designworks doesn't make a chain slider for the WR250R. Their stuff is indestructible.
  9. bogboy

    bogboy Adventurer

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  10. ggemelos

    ggemelos Been here awhile

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    New York, NY
    Does anyone have experience using heated grips with fat bars? I just ordered an HDB setup and was thinking it would be easy to replace the grips at the same time as I install the new bar, but I have heard that heated grips don't work well on aluminum bars as the aluminum soaks up the heat. Any first hand experience and recommendation for heated grips?
  11. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Harvey Mushman

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    I'm probably the only one here with this set up, but I like it. I use aerostich's velcro wrap grip heaters. They heat up very quickly and when I don't need them (which is most of the time) I take them off and store them. That way I can use the grips I like best and since they are positioned immediately under my gloves and insulated from the bars by the grips it doesn't matter whether you've got aluminum or steel bars.

    They've worked well for me:

    [​IMG]
  12. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    tucson, AZ, It's a dry hate.
    I've used the standard symtec grip heaters on all my motorcycles including my current two (tiger 800 roadie and the wr) which both have Al bars. The symtec unit is supposed to compensate somewhat for the greater bar conduction on the clutch side. Yes, the Al is a great conductor of heat. To minimize the losses into the bar on the clutch side I wrap the bar with a couple layers of kapton tape. This helps but the throttle side still gets warmer. I am going to try to fit a thin piece of plastic tubing/pipe to mimic the throttle tube and secure that to the clutch side bar which I think will make things better. The symtec set-up is $35 and I've found it to be very reliable.
  13. cjbiker

    cjbiker Nobody's Robot

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    I have aluminum bars and the under-the-grips heating elements on my KLR. It does not work well. I even wrapped the left side with a few turns of electrical tape before applying the heating element to try and stop the heat loss. The grips get warm when I'm stopped at a light, but as soon as I get moving, they cool off as the airflow wicks the heat away through the bars.

    I used the velcro heated wraps, and they get nice and hot, but I didn't like the extra bulk. I prefer thin grips. I'm going to try heated gloves next.
  14. Outwardbound

    Outwardbound Been here awhile

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    Picked up an "X" rear wheel today. My plan is NOT to pick up an X front wheel because I don't want to be swapping brake rotor hardware around to convert to a 17" front. I'm thinking about using street oriented tires and simply swapping for wheels with knobbies installed when I go for real dirt. The new wheel is a 17" rim as opposed to an OEM 18 on the "R". If I go with a higher profile on the tire ( for example 130/90 rather than 130/70) the rolling diameter of both the 18 and 17 should be very close to being the same. Thus from a handling standpoint it should be equivalent.....right? I'm NOT a suspension geometry expert, so I seek the wisdom of the hive (so to speak). Has anyone ever done the 21/17 combo?
  15. MeefZah

    MeefZah Curmudgeonly

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    A large piece (like sized for a battery cable) of heat shrink over the clutch side bar works well; in the past I have also glued a cut up piece of a soda bottle over the clutch side and then glued the heating element and grip over top of that.
  16. cjbiker

    cjbiker Nobody's Robot

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    I tried the heat shrink first, but couldn't get the grip over the HS+heating element.
  17. MeefZah

    MeefZah Curmudgeonly

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    Toss the grip in damn near boiling water for a minute or two, it'll stretch nicely when you install it and once it cools down will tighten back up. Apply it to the bar still wet, just shake off the excess water but don't actually dry it.
  18. pfy50

    pfy50 Professional nOOb

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    Have you tried using HVAC heat reflective Duct tape (available @ hardware store) on clutch side and use a plastic throttle tube, not metal one.
  19. 10Cup

    10Cup Long timer

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    I have the hot grips on my WR with the aluminum handle bars and they work perfectly. VERY warm.
  20. UtahFox

    UtahFox Been here awhile

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    Salt Lake City
    My stuff is on the way, but so is a storm and my work area is covered but outside. I'll give a shout out when I get it done. Have you thought about a tail tidy? Maybe that'd work better for you than stock.