Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. skierd

    skierd Wannabe Far-Rider

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    No reason the Anakee won't work, but I hear mixed reviews on it from the BMW people that usually run them. Only issue you might run in to is not being able to get the tire warm since the WR is so light by comparison.

    Another alternative would be the Heidenau K76. I've got one on the rear right now and it seems like it's going to last forever...
  2. coresports

    coresports coresports

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    thanks...the 705 is 1/2 the price of the michelin and seems like a decent tire...
    i am going to try it

  3. japako

    japako Been here awhile

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    I've used this tire on my Super Tenere(different size) and really liked the handling on wet or dry pavement. Price is not too bad either.. It might work..??

    90/90-21 (54V) Continental Trail Attack-Front Dual Sport Motorcycle Tire
  4. BlueLghtning

    BlueLghtning Riding is my passion

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    The Anakee will be the stickier of the two between the 705 and the Anakee and will work better on pavement if you really push tires. The 705 will work better on gravel, but its not a bad street tire either. The Anakee remains one of my favorite front tires on my Vstrom 650 for pure street use. I've ran several 705's too, but the Anakee for street duty is hard to beat. The 705 price is pretty sweet though too.
  5. byron555

    byron555 Lame Duck Adventurer

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    I run the 705's for my daily commute on the WRr, no problem in any weather temps from 35 to 100+ degrees F (have not tried snow). I spoon on Trackmater II for trips up North. The 705 is ok off-road, by no means is it a knobbie though.

    First rear 705 lasted about 7500 miles, still had some life left. The front must have about 10k to 11k on it... Still at about 40-50%. The tire is cheap enough that I don't feel the need to run it completely down to nothing.

    As a side note I used a Kenda 761 before the 705, the 705 is far better in every way. Only got about 3k miles out of the kenda before it started to get sketchy in the wet
  6. jglow

    jglow Two wheeled traveler

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    Has anyone ever actually just changed out the pump motor?? How is it getting into the plastic housing to get the old one out :ear?
  7. simmons1

    simmons1 Long timer

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    I think Krabill said it was difficult.

    I may buy one and try it since my replacement pump failed already.
  8. tmotten

    tmotten Lefthand ride Dutchy

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    :clap:clap

    Would love it if you could film it and post it on youtube.
  9. what broke now

    what broke now Petroleum Brother

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    seattle
    Slow and tedious, but possible. Leave the beer till after. It is designed with manufacturing and assembly ease in mind, not refit.

    I was looking mine over one day when it was out, and started looking closely, and 15min later it was apart. Shortly after it was back together.

    Mark Sampson's site has a ride report where his buddy took Mark's apart with tools they had on a ride. Pictures are included, but no step by step narrative.
  10. Oz-Strom

    Oz-Strom Still trying

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    QUOTE - Michelin Anakee 2 Adventure Touring Front Tire -
    is there any reason this tire won't work on the front of my wrr's 21" rim? it's a 90/90/21H it would be strictly a street application as i have a second set of wheels/tires for the dirt. has anyone had experience with them? i am figuring it's a Michelin so probably a decent tire but it is a bit pricey. thanks in advance for any responses.

    I like the Pirelli Scorpion Trail as a road tyre. Used it on my Aprilia Pegaso Trail for commuting and great on road and not a bad dirt tyre for dirt/gravel tracks and roads
    [​IMG]
  11. mattadv93

    mattadv93 Been here awhile

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    So what would this bike be like as a first bike for a big guy, im 6'4 and 110kg. What the power like compared to a ttr250 as my dad keeps telling me to get the ttr250 but i think i will enjoy this bike better.
  12. Sewerat

    Sewerat Cert. bike whore

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    It will be fine. I'm a little shorter then you but weighed about the same when I got the bike. Now after having the bike, reading about all the mods and all the shaving of mere ounces off these bikes I found he easiest way to make the bike go faster and be lighter was to make the rider lighter. So that I did, one less burger at the fast old joint at a time and am now at about 215lbs.
  13. UtahFox

    UtahFox Been here awhile

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    I went and did the American Supercamp for this very reason. I had a lot of mountain biking (in the mountains) experience and that really helped with any technical descents, but powered riding is a different animal otherwise. Simply taking it slow to begin with is a good start, and there are some good books as well to get you started thinking about specific techniques. But I can't recommend the Supercamp highly enough, it gave me a great foundation to build on.
  14. UtahFox

    UtahFox Been here awhile

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    This is a total exaggeration, I have done all the airbox mods and have the FMF Powercore & Powerbomb. You have to be wringing its neck to get anywhere close to the racket a Harley makes. On top of that, if you are conscious of the noise you don't want to make, you just shift early and it purrs like a kitten. This is my experience, though YMMV.
  15. Revvy

    Revvy Okayest Adventurer

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    I need to be pointed in the right direction to what the suspension settings do. My first bike that I've had the ability to adjust suspension, I really am lacking in understanding what I'm doing when making adjustments.

    Right now, I'm dealing with teeth jarring impact when doing 30 over speed bumps. I know I can adjust for rebound and compression, I just don't know if I need to adjust harder or softer on each one.
  16. PatrickInVA

    PatrickInVA Been here awhile

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    Suspension settings I'm running since like Revvy I know nothing about tweaking on a bike suspension.

  17. mpatch

    mpatch Long timer

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    Opening the air box is louder than the exhaust. Just open the air box door and rev the engine a few times and you'll see what I mean.
  18. cjbiker

    cjbiker Nobody's Robot

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    I'm pretty sure that's the point of a speed bump :deal

    Seriously though, the settings above are a good starting point. But before that, make sure your sag is set correctly. Depending on your weight you may need a softer or stiffer spring, too. Search Google for setting suspension sag on dirt bikes.
  19. kawagumby

    kawagumby Long timer

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    Damping settings aside,

    If you weigh less than 175 the stock rear spring may be too stiff, you can compensate by going with a little more rider sag than usual - experiment.

    The front forks come all screwed up - the spring rate is OK for most middle-sized guys, but the oil is a bit too heavy and there is too much of it.

    You can make the forks supple by replacing the oil with a light 5wt - I used amsoil, and setting the oil height to 115 or 120 mm.

    My bike came with one fork oil level at 90mm and one at 95. They had a mid-stroke spike and were not getting full travel, and were harsh in general. Now, after the oil change there is more air cushion and the forks go through the full range of travel without a hiccup. They absorb small bumps, rocks, etc completely. Huge difference. I've barely bottomed them on really rough off-road stuff with the 120mm oil setting (I weigh 160). Gone is the "hang on tight or die" syndrome.
    IMO they need more compression damping, but that's another story - as they come with tiny 16mm diameter compression stacks that only flow about one-third of what std kayaba compression stacks can flow. Why the factory went to such a small mickey-mouse stack design I cannot understand. Just changing the oil as I've described will make the forks more than acceptable for most riders.

    I had the best luck, damping-setting wise with the fork compression all the way in (full compression) and the rear shock with full rebound. I ride off-road on worn out trails with lots of square edged holes and small jumps. Those settings are needed to keep the rear from coming up and pitching you forward off of jumps, water bars, etc. I was running fork rebound at middle area and shock compression light. Everyone rides a little different so you should do some experimenting.

    With regard to the rear shock, I finally caved and had GoRace revalve the thing (I also went to the next lighter spring) - his experience will net a one-time revalve - I can attest the shock action is now as good as my off-road bikes. With regard to the front, I'm now setting up WR450 forks for the bike as they are more tunable and have a normal stack size (I ride very technical black-diamond single-track with this beast so I might be demanding a little more than the average rider).
  20. woofer2609

    woofer2609 Been here awhile

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