Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. Wallrat

    Wallrat Been here awhile

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    Nothing. 1/4" aluminum plates are basically all the same, it all comes down to style and selection. Either folks like the look of the FR plate better (true in my case) or its just that you tend to get "forum favorites". Go to another WRR site and you might see that everyone runs a GYTR. I'm sure the GYTR is a quality part and won't give you any issues.
  2. BluePill

    BluePill AARP Slacker

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    Viagra is available on the internet.
  3. bluzharp

    bluzharp Adventurer

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    I have run both 13/48 and 13/47 with a fresh MT43. I have settled on the 47 when running mostly doubletrack with a decent percentage of street riding. The 48 is better in the gnarly singletrack but feels wound a bit tight on the highway.(I could go slower I guess) It also tightens the range between gears, most notably between 1st and 2nd. I will be going to 14/50 when this is ready to be swapped out.
  4. ET-VT

    ET-VT Been here awhile

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    I think I'm pretty happy with the stock gearing with MT-21s. I spend most of my time on trails in 1st gear. I don't really have a problem crawling through slow stuff and I like not having to upshift when climbing hills. A 45T in the rear might be okay, but I wouldn't want to take too much off the top speed in 1st.
  5. rubberband

    rubberband Will ride for tacos

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    if 14/48 seems wound out...why change to 14/50? wouldn't that be eve more wound out? or you planning less highway, more gnarly ST?
  6. skierd

    skierd Wannabe Far-Rider

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    One day this winter, when my bike's apart for maintenance, I'll take a picture of the grooves in my Sandman case saver that came from running a 14T front sprocket and I'll let y'all decide if it's worth running. I'll never run a 14T again.

    With an MT43, I'd run 13/47 or 13/48 since it's a REALLY tall tire, and then run the chain longer so it doesn't contact the swingarm. i.e. with a 13/47, run a 112L instead of a 110L. 112L should cover the 13/48 too.

    On the middle sized D606, 13/47 is about perfect for all around use.

    On a stock sized tire, 13/45 works great if a little short on the highway for lots of interstate work. I like the 45 rear on my X now that it's running a 150/70/17, but for all around use the stock 42T and 43T worked great with a stock sized rear tire.
  7. byron555

    byron555 Lame Duck Adventurer

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    I run a 14t sprocket and a Sandman Case Saver with zero issues. I run 14/49 sprockets and adjust the chain by deflection measurement.

    This is hard to explain in text. Both of my sprockets are larger there by increasing the chain distance from the swingarm (top and bottom). If a proper stock gearing adjusted chain is say 10mm from the swing arm with x amount of slack taken out of the chain (pushed up towards the swing arm) When you increase the size of the sprockets you increase that distance, 10mm goes to say 15mm. If you keep it at 10mm with the larger sprockets your chain will be looser.

    That is probably as clear as mud..... regardless I have not had any wear on my sandman case saver, and only typical wear on my slider (compared to your avg dualsport, not just WRr)
  8. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    He said 13/48 and 14/50. The latter should be very slightly higher gearing.
  9. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    Once again, the discussion has focused on the diameter of the front sprocket as the cause of slider wear. My 12T front and lack of slider wear suggests otherwise to me.

    As I have posted before, I think this is a more complex issue, caused by a combination of factors, a "perfect storm" if you will. A worn, kinked chain, perhaps combined with a heavily loaded bike, perhaps combined with improperly set sag, and maybe a too-tight chain, AND in some combination of these all at the same time.

    I already have my next sprockets, and I will go to a 13/47 (currently 12/43), because the logic of moving the chain further from the swingarm is undeniable. The reason I will do so is because it seems sensible & logical, but I have not had any issues (yet anyway) running a 12T front.

    Thinking a 14T front is the silver bullet to eliminate slider wear may lead some to think "problem solved", and perhaps to damage a swingarm due to decreased diligence in inspecting the chain, sprockets and slider.
  10. chabon

    chabon Been here awhile

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    Here's a couple shots all loaded up to go to Cambria for Horizons Unlimited get together and then followed by trip to Copper Canyon in a couple weeks. It looks pretty good without all the gear hanging off it also.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ddmcginnis/10430016826/" title="2013-10-22 15.51.43 by DDMcGinnis, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2858/10430016826_fd76ee6562_c.jpg" width="800" height="452" alt="2013-10-22 15.51.43"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ddmcginnis/10430160443/" title="2013-10-22 15.51.27 by DDMcGinnis, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2841/10430160443_9f28340f9b_c.jpg" width="800" height="452" alt="2013-10-22 15.51.27"></a>
  11. skierd

    skierd Wannabe Far-Rider

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    I understand what you're saying, and maybe it was due to having a somewhat loose chain though I also go by chain deflection.

    Regardless, the amount of wear on the chain links and the chain saver itself convinced me to not run that sprocket size again. I've had good luck with my swingarm guard over the years, and only get wear on it when the chain gets old, kinked, and dirty, chain tension and whether or not the bike is loaded or unloaded doesn't seem to matter nearly as much as the condition of the chain itself. I'm sitting at just over 43,000 miles and have gone through two sliders, both were with 12T, 13T, and 14T sprockets on throughout their life.
  12. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day.

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    Well I never carry a HD tube for a spare (but I run one) so you may have a point there.
  13. DaymienRules

    DaymienRules Traffic target

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    Have you actually ridden with the tank panniers loaded up? I tried them and it was a pretty awful failure. Velcro adhesive proved insufficient, bags started moving around, then beating me in the kneecaps. Roadside fix involved straps around each bag, connected to each other over the steering head. They're great for holding standard nalgene bottles though, if you can make them work.
  14. jgormley

    jgormley Been here awhile

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    It might be helpful to note compression and rebound settings when reporting chain wear...

    I just switched to a soft compression and a slow rebound on both front and rear.. in an attempt to stop a wear issue...

    I did have soft compression and fast rebound and the rear swing arm was much more active than it is now...
  15. Zapp22

    Zapp22 ZAPP - Tejas

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    any of you guys going to amateur-ride one of these in the november Baja?
  16. Bgunn

    Bgunn Mucha distancia

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    Looks like you could leave in the morning. Well sorted WR. I need to start getting ready, a couple of weeks is coming fast.
  17. byron555

    byron555 Lame Duck Adventurer

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    I'm sure you can run the 12t without issue, it just takes more effort to dial in the tension. The 14t has not been a problem for my bike so far. All 3 work, provided the chain tension is correct for each set up.

    This and the fuel pump get kicked to death on this tread, primarily because the only real problems this bike has is with the fuel pump and the swing arm wear. If these problems didn't exist, the WR250r would be the absolute perfect Dual Sport... this would be a sign of the end times as there is no such thing as true perfection
  18. ADWrider

    ADWrider AKA Acorn27

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    I have an Immix rack, it's a pretty solid rack. It is 100% steel so it's maybe a bit heavier than some aluminum racks, but being steel it should be quite strong. I think you could probably lift up the whole bike with it.

    It is one of the larger platforms out there, which I like. And the mounting to the subframe is pretty robust. Rather than using the four closely-spaced anchor points under the fender, the mounting is spread further apart (two anchors under the fender, two farther forward under the seat with a bracket).

    YMMV
  19. TexaNate

    TexaNate Been here awhile

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    Exactly. Yamaha did us a favor - if the WRR were the perfect dual-sport, the sky would turn red, pigs would fly and the world would end!:freaky

    I have 6800mi on the original chain slider (13/47 gearing), the last 1,800 of which I've been adjusting the chain tension using SheWolf's heuristic. Inch and a bit between the swingarm and chain, tighten it up and off I go. Seems to work OK. Once I did it up a little too tight and I really liked the way the bike felt (less jerky at low speed because less driveline slack, easier shifts as well) but I loosened it up a little after that. Scared of oil leaks at the countershaft sprocket, and all the associated horrors...
  20. chabon

    chabon Been here awhile

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    Forget the Velcro, I put a couple grommets in the bottom of the bags and ran a bungee cord between the bags. No more flapping.

    Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk 4