Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. BUSdriver

    BUSdriver Pop Copy Manager

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    Thanks, I appreciate the kind words. It was actually pretty easy too.


    I wish I had ordered white... grrr. Maybe the blue won't be too bad?
    #61
  2. montesa_vr

    montesa_vr Legend in his own mind

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    There'a a whole thread on break-in of the WR250R here: nachtflugs serious 2008 WR250R thread
    #62
  3. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    As Montesa suggested, check out NachtFlug's thread. Basically, don't baby it, change the oil/filter early (<50 miles!), then again around 500 miles, then just go with what the book says.


    I so hate you....for making me miss some of my old stompin' grounds! :lol3 Nice pics! And it's great to see more folks starting to pop up with pics of their new blue terrors out in the wild. :thumb

    -NoVector
    #63
  4. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    :lol3

    I'd love to chat with the product manager for this bike and find out what their target "size" was, because it sure seems to me like we're right in the bullseye.

    The one thing I'll caution you on is power/acceleration. If you're looking for a bike that will pull (and I mean pull hard) from low revs to the limit, wait until next year and see if Yamaha and Suzuki (and maybe others, but I doubt it) come out with 450s (WR450R, DRZ450S).

    Don't get me wrong, this bike will accelerate just fine if you're quick with the shifter in the first 3 gears with my butt in the saddle (as in, will beat most cars to the next light if you need to make a lane change, etc.), but unless you keep the revs up, 5th and 6th don't have that "whack the throttle open...whoa" snap to them. Same thing goes for off-road. If you want big acceleration throughout the rpm range, look at a 450+.

    If, on the other hand, you want good acceleration, with no "oh sh*t!" surprises from getting too crazy with the twisty grip, then the little WRR won't disappoint you. :thumb

    -NoVector
    #64
  5. BUSdriver

    BUSdriver Pop Copy Manager

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    Thanks guys! I'll check out the thread Montesa suggested.

    I'm going to possibly tinker with lowering it today...

    back to work tomorrow. :cry
    #65
  6. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    Ah, OK. Yep, race sag is 1/3. I was thinking you meant static sag. :shog


    I'll second that! It's funny, but when I was out riding yesterday, I was thinking about how the KTM 250EXC and Husky TE250 might compare to the WRR in the suspension department (assuming we could get the little KTM in the US...grrrrr). For $3k less than my KTM, I'm impressed. :thumb

    I'll check my race sag up front and report back. I'm thinking that the springs are more for a 190lb+ rider, so that may be why you aren't seeing as much sag. Of course, it could also just be that they're new, and they'll settle in a bit over time. Just for grins, if you were pounding them hard off-road, you may want to check the bleeders and see if you've built up some air pressure in the legs. :dunno

    -NoVector
    #66
  7. levity

    levity nano-Adventurer

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    Just changed the oil on mine for the first time after 200 miles mixed riding. It was so clean (gold and clear) I thought about just pouring it back in.
    No metal shavings or any gasket stuff like I usually see at the first service of other bikes. :clap
    (I would like to source a drain plug with a magnet to confirm no shavings.)

    I didn't even bother to put in a new filter - I'll wait until the 500-600 mile service when I may switch to synthetic blend.

    Other service info: chain needed very little adjustment; spokes <1/8th turn;
    license plate light housing was loose so I added a spacer washer;
    bled forks again - no apparent pressure build up.
    #67
  8. G-Wing

    G-Wing Been here awhile

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    Patience he said,,,,they're quoting $6,199 OTD. Made me happy :D
    #68
  9. K_N_Fodder

    K_N_Fodder Long timer

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    Great thread guys! Thanks for all of the insight and pictures. This sounds like a great bike, I'm a bit suprised at all of the favorable reviews. A few months back I started slavvering for a bike that wouldn't squish me when it fell over like my KLR does and that I could actually take into the dirt. The last few weeks I've been sitting on a WR at the local shop and dreaming.... I'm selling my 4Runner so there will be room in the garage, right? My wife can't complain too bad, she has 4 bicycles in there (I only have three) :). I'm also relatively new, back on bikes in the last two years after a 15 year hiatus. Thanks again and keep the reviews coming.

    J
    #69
  10. johnnyandjebus

    johnnyandjebus Been here awhile

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    This baby pulls great and it definitely feels lighter than my DR350.

    Gargoyle

    I would love to read your thoughts on a comparision between the 2 bikes. I currently own a dr350, after all I have read here I am starting to think the wr250r might be a worthy replacement over the drz400.
    Actually I started to have that thought the moment I threw my leg over one at the local dealer!! but at 7000$ plus cdn it may have to wait a year or two
    #70
  11. Para504

    Para504 Spam, Spam, bacon & Spam!

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    emersonbiggins, I enjoyed your post about the enduro! I think a lot of us have been there! It does get better with a little patience & those learnings your going through :D Slow is smooth, smooth is fast! lol...
    #71
  12. Speed3

    Speed3 Almost ready for TransTaiga

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    Does this have the same engine as the 2007 WR250F??? I rode one from a friend today in a sand quarry in Maryland and had a blast. I was thinking of getting a DRZ400 next year but this may change things. About the seat I can tell you the WR250F makes your ass sour in no time even if you stand on it most of the time.:huh The picture is of one of the trails around the quarry had a lot of water there from recent rain. Needless to say I got wet very wet. :D

    Attached Files:

    #72
  13. montesa_vr

    montesa_vr Legend in his own mind

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    No relationship whatsover. They probably don't share a single part number. The engine on the WR250R is built up from parts from the YZF-R1 1000cc 4-cylinder.
    #73
  14. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    I finally got around to doing my post-break-in oil change. While your old oil apparently looked like it just squirted out of a bee's arse :lol3, mine looked like this:

    [​IMG]

    Now THAT'S what I expect "treat it like it owes you money" break-in oil to look like. I had 53 miles on the clock. Note the yummy looking "brain" pattern formed by the particulates in the oil. Mmmmmm :evil.

    I'll change the oil again at 200 miles as I intend to continue to ride it like I stole it, and if it still looks like the above, I'll do it again at 500, then will get onto the "book" schedule.

    One question I have for the collective is the age-old "when should I switch to synthetic"? On road bikes, I don't switch until around 10k miles. Since this motor is more akin to a road bike than a dirt bike, should I stick with that, or switch after the 3k mark?

    FYI, the only adjustment the bike has needed so far is the clutch free play. Shocking, eh? :evil

    Oh, and one last note: Even though I changed the filter too, it only took 1.2L of oil, but the book says it should take nearly 1.5L. The motor was hot to the touch when I did the change and the oil ran like water, so it wasn't an issue of thick oil not draining out entirely. Are others finding the same thing?

    -NoVector
    #74
  15. velosprocket

    velosprocket Been here awhile

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    NoVector,

    Since you own basically all the bikes I'm targeting right now....

    If you could only have one, which one would you choose? I was dead set on a DRZ400, but now I'm looking at the WR. The used KTM market seems good now too. I'm really having a hard time.

    I love the thought of FI, but the 250 at altitude....

    The DRZ is heavy.

    The KTM requires more maintenance.

    I'd love to pick your brain. Shoot me PM, or reply here.

    Thanks,

    Velo
    #75
  16. Gargoyle

    Gargoyle Trail Jester

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    I tell you that coming off my '99 DR350, which I really liked, had me a little worried if the WR would haul my 195lbs around OK. I now have 230 miles on and the WR seems to be breaking in quite well. There are absolutely no concerns about this motor being able to haul my ass ... I have hit 80mph easily on the road (I am sure it will do over 90mph now) and it's got great grunt in the dirt.

    I have an FMF pipe/muffler on order (had one on my DR too) and I have heard from 2 other current WR250R/X owners with that setup that performance improves throughout the range even more.

    The engine and suspension are unbelievable for a 250 dual sport bike. Much lighter feel when riding than the DR350. I realize it's a bit expensive, but sometimes "you get what you pay for." I love this bike.
    #76
  17. Reposado1800

    Reposado1800 Juicy J fan!

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    What is the part number for the 250R/X oil filter? Nobody seems to have online microfiche up for these bikes yet.
    #77
  18. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    I'm at work right now, but when I get home I'll get the part number off the box and post here. Stay tuned....

    -NoVector
    #78
  19. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    Hey Velo,

    I'll reply here since I'm sure there are others out there with the same (or similar) question. Hell, I was one of them! :D

    I think it boils down to how do you want to use the bike. That's what it came down to for me. What I was looking for was a fun, small(ish) (both size and weight....I want to put it on my Jack-Rack on the back of my Yukon and haul it around if needed), low maintenance (sorry, I know folks are tired of hearing that, but with little kids at home, I barely have time to ride, I don't want to spend that time wrenching), capable bike that I could take mainly off-road (so that's why I didn't get the X, but after playing with this thing on-road, there are SuMo wheels in my future :evil), but was street legal out of the box so there would be no worries regarding plates here in Kommiefornia. :lol3

    With that combo of "wants", my choices were really the DRZ (had one, loved it, just too heavy...more on that in a minute), the WRR, and the KLX-S. I had the KTM and loved it, but 500 mile oil changes with 2 screens to clean and worries about the tranny going "boom" from riding it on-road (KTM put the fear into us saying the gears weren't meant for the street, even with a cush drive, blah blah blah, and I didn't want to risk it :dunno) kept me away from another one. Plus, the EXC250 isn't available in the US, and I was looking for a 250 (more on that in a minute also). I checked out the KLXS, but was put off by the reports of the lack of power, the not-so-great fit and finish, and the smallish ergos (I looked at one at the San Mateo Int'l Motorcycle show). I also checked out the Husky TE250. What a nice looking bike! Problem is, they're hard as hell to find, and given what I paid for the WRR, nearly $2k more expensive (yes, I got the deal of the decade....:evil). Of course, there's always the maintenance question again, but I've never owned a Husky, so I can't speak to recommended oil service, etc., but I've heard it's more in line with dirt bike schedules (500-1000 mile recommended oil change, valve check, etc.) versus road bike schedules (3k oil, 20k valve, etc.).

    OK, on to the controversial topic of weight. Here we go. I'll put my flame-retardant suit on right after I hit "submit"..:lol3. So, I've come to have new respect for what I thought was complete BS: dynamic weight. We all know what static weight is. It's how much the damn thing weighs on a scale. Going by that, my DRZ was actually lighter than the WRR (mine was the E model, so 10lbs lighter than the WRR), and my KTM was more than 20lbs lighter. Both felt heavier than the WRR when riding. Others can probably explain this much better than I can, but apparently all that rotating mass of the bigger bikes makes them "feel" heavier, even if they are in fact lighter. Even folks in the industry (Dirt Bike, Dirt Rider, etc.) talk about bigger displacement bikes feeling heavier. Well, I thought it was crap until now. All I know is the WRR feels like the lightest of my 3 recent "dirt" bikes (WRR, KTM, DRZ) when riding it, and I don't notice much of a difference lifting it onto my stand or pushing it around the garage. OK, let the war begin! :hide :lol3

    Finally, I have to say that I'm just impressed as heck with what the WRR comes with. 46mm KYB forks with compression/rebound adjust, and comp/reb adjust on the Soqi shock. Nice stuff for a dual-sport bike. My impression so far is you could take the WRR on a MX track and not blow through the suspension on every little bump/jump. Sure, you'll probably bang it off the stops over 80ft gaps, but that's not it's mission. Then there's the FI. It's pretty dang good! It was a little snatchy at first at really low throttle openings, but as the bike loosens up, it's smoothing out nicely. Fit and finish of components seem very good. And last but not least, even with my 200+lbs (with gear) on it's back, it hauls the mail! The only way you could convince me it's a 250cc 4-stroke is by the lack of low-end punch compared to the DRZ400, or to an even greater extent, the KTM520. But then, how could it match those bikes in torque? It's only 250cc! If you want more torque, go to a bigger motor (and pay the "dynamic weight" price). Me, I'm happy on the WRR, and if I want a bit more low end, I'll go up 2 teeth on the rear and call it a day. I don't need to go 95mph on the freeway on this bike anyway. :D

    If I could have only one? Well, I do only have one now, and it's the WRR. :thumb

    I hope this helps.

    -NoVector
    #79
  20. velosprocket

    velosprocket Been here awhile

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    Very nice, thank you!

    I'm going to look at another used DRZ tonight. Of course it's used, and 3500 less OTD than the WRR. But still, the 250 has my interest. The fuel infection is nice. I ride locally at 5000 ft, to 12,000 ft in the same day.
    #80