Year 2000 era Husqvarna TE-610 Info Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Muggins, Nov 13, 2008.

  1. Muggins

    Muggins Been here awhile

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    Hello,

    The Husky TE-610 deserves more than 1 bloated thread, so let's try to dig up and organize some info on the older models. Most of the threads here were started after 06 when the model got a refresh, so its been hard to find info on the 2000 era Huskies. The index thread and the big Husky 610 sign in thread, google, ebay, etc. didnt answer many of my questions.... and I was hoping the good folks here on ADVrider could help me out.

    I recently acquired a bone stock 2000 TE-610 with only 5kmi in excellent++ shape. I know the 610 is no BRP when it comes to aftermarket farkles, but I'm having trouble finding much of anything.

    What years are the 2000's sharing parts with?
    Is the engine the same from 99 through 07?
    Where can I find a larger gas tank?
    What are some easy uncorking mods?
    Where can I find more generic parts like hand guards, pegs, skid plates, etc.?

    What about some "How To's"?
    Adjusting + Replacing cam-chain?
    Post thrashing tear down maintenance (swingarm bearing greasing, stearing head bearing greasing, etc. etc.)?
    General Maintenance tips & tricks?

    Anything else would be spec-freakin-tactular!

    :ear :ear :ear :ear :ear :ear
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  2. Muggins

    Muggins Been here awhile

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    Anyone out there? :ear
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  3. Ruffus

    Ruffus Dirty Old Mudder

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    Here's a couple places you can check for parts

    eBay Store - billsmcplus: HUSQVARNA PARTS: HUSQVARNA TC250 FRAME ASSEMBLY 2004 MODEL, HUSQVARNA WR360 CRANKSHAFT 1999 MODEL

    eBay Store - Fugi's Factory: HUSQVARNA DIRTBIKE PARTS: HUSQVARNA 250 450 510 TC TE REAR BREMBO MASTER CYLINDER

    Also you can try calling Uptite. George knows most things Husky.
    Also Halls is a good source for Husky parts along with Motoxotica.


    Sorry I can't help you more
    A good site to check out & ask questions is

    Cafe Husky


    Along with the Husky forum of TT
    #3
  4. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    I think the big difference is between the off road only, competition version of the engine and the dual sport version. The off road only version uses a reed valve only for oil "pressure", has a very minimalist filtration system, no counterbalancer and is kick start only. The dual sport version has two oil pumps, an oil filtration system designed to cope with street riding and longer service intervals, e-start, counterbalancer, lower compression and perhaps a more mild cam. The current generation TE610 has only been available in dual sport trim as the TE510 took over open class off road competition duties. The current gen TE engine has several revisions (different carb, I think more compression and different cam, not sure what else) but as far as I know all major castings and hard parts are the same.

    Anyway, this is all from memory, I'm not an expert on these bikes and some of this may not be 100% accurate but at least its a start:)
    #4
  5. Muggins

    Muggins Been here awhile

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  6. NOTAR_520

    NOTAR_520 Been here awhile

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    I've also been looking for data on the older models.

    Is your 2000 TE-610 a six speed?

    Thanks for the info BikePilot, good stuff, and looking at the TT link now, thanks guys.

    edit: looks to have a 6 speed tranny from looking at the pdf, tks What kind of RPM's are you at when riding at 60, 70mph?
    #6
  7. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    I believe the TE610 has been six speed since its inception, at the least for quite a long time anyway:)
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  8. Huskyfatman

    Huskyfatman Stinky Wizzleteats

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  9. Trang

    Trang ... 2nd last to the Sweep

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    The Big question is if your 610 has electric start. :dunno

    There were a number of variants of the 610 during the years 1999 to around 2003/4.
    These were:
    TE-610 - Enduro
    TC-610 - Motocross
    TE-570 - Enduro
    TE-610e - Trail/Enduro
    There were also some Motard versions of these bikes.

    The 610 that was in production up until 1999/2000 changed to being a TE570. That is, was the engine of the 610, but with the plastics and look of the other models of its time. These plastics are similar to what is in current production.

    The 610e (with electric start) was the basic chasis and plastics of the 98/99 model bikes, but with an e-start motor. Apart from some minor changes this engine is what is cuurntly in production. These bikes were built during huskies 'dark years' and kind of used up spare parts and tooling from the late 90's.

    So the 570 was the hybrid of the Old motor, and the New looks.

    Some of the 610's of the 98/99 era was toned back a bit and had conventional front forks, while the TC610 and TE570 had USD.

    If you have an E model 610 (2000-2004) which is what i have, you will find that most 'cosmetic' parts fit from the 98-99 models, whilst all motor parts will be as per current.

    I have made a number of changes to my 610, and most of these have been to earier model parts:
    - Mufflers - 98 model - no Cat
    - Suspension - 99 model
    etc.

    The Chasis effectivly has never had any major changes, and remains the same as what was in production for most of the 90's (if not before)

    Hope this helps
    #9
  10. Xcuvator

    Xcuvator Justa Venturer

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    This is good stuff.:ear
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  11. Trang

    Trang ... 2nd last to the Sweep

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    Y1998~1999 TE610
    [​IMG]

    Y2000 TE610
    [​IMG]

    Y2000 to 2004 TE610e
    [​IMG]


    Y2000-2002 TE570
    [​IMG]

    None built during 2005

    Y2006 to Current TE610ie
    [​IMG]
    #11
  12. Trang

    Trang ... 2nd last to the Sweep

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    You will also find a lot of inconsistance with bike specs during this time.

    Some things that seems to vary include Forks, Graphics etc.

    This bike appears to be an earlier model plastics, but with e-start from a later model? :dunno

    [​IMG]

    I've spoken with husky dealers, and even they dissagree on what model is what.
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  13. Trang

    Trang ... 2nd last to the Sweep

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  14. Muggins

    Muggins Been here awhile

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    WOW! Awesome info/pics. Thanks! :freaky

    I honestly wasnt 100% sure if the bike I bought was in fact the te610e (with the true dual sport tuned motor). Well now I'm sure. I'm on an 00 TE610E with 5kmi and I believe the original tires. Total garage queen :clap . I'm still going to check every single nut and bolt though just to be safe and start to figure out what to carry on bike for tools.

    Anyone here live near London that have a garage and would want to help me do a little wrenching? Beer & chow is on me!

    huskyfatman - great articles. I'm going to print and frame those bad boys...haha. Funny, those larger tanks on the AU bikes dont look all that much bigger. I honestly dont know what mine has on it. Its a UK original, so maybe I'll get lucky (but I doubt it).

    Quick question for yah - Are you truely a huskyfatman? I'm tipping the scales around 235 lbs these days. Although I'm working on that (kindof), I'd be interested in hearing the best way to firm up the forks for bigger fellas. The articles you linked both say the stockers are on the soft side to begin with. Many thanks in advance.

    husky610e - awesome, that model/year layout & description is exactly what we needed! Those Dakar pics are the best swedish porn I've seen in a while :rofl . I wonder if Africa Queens or anyone else still has the molds or specs for those Dakar fairings. I think a round baja style headlight in one of those would be the ticket.

    To my eyes, the engine looks identical from 00 to present (for the TE610E obviously). I'm REEEAAALLLY tempted to try and stuff a Rekluse in it. Any other engine mods to safely (and cheaply) add a few ponies and uncork from stock? I think you mentioned 99 cans. Carb upgrades or even replacements? What about adding a snorkle or something to the air box? I hear they are on the shallow side, not that I plan on submarining it for a while anyways.

    Keep it commin fellas!!!
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  15. Trang

    Trang ... 2nd last to the Sweep

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  16. Trang

    Trang ... 2nd last to the Sweep

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  17. Huskyfatman

    Huskyfatman Stinky Wizzleteats

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    Yeah I'm quite girthy, around 300 lbs. And yes I had to put in heavier springs and valving in all the Huskys I've owned. Here I am about 15 years ago when I "only" weighed like 210. I believe I may have hit a gum wrapper with the stock suspension. (1993 WXE350 with Showas)
    [​IMG]


    I had RG3 do the suspension on my 2000 which was WAY too soft. Your "e" version is even softer I believe, so heavier springs are needed for more serious off roading.
    Here's my 2000, it's a kick only model.
    http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c231/fatdonyo/003.jpg?t=1226892582

    Here's a shot of my '95 with the oversized tank. It also fits the 2000, and holds slightly over four gallons, where the stocker holds 2.4.
    http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c231/fatdonyo/P1010151.jpg?t=1226892764
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  18. Muggins

    Muggins Been here awhile

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    So what's it gonna take for you to part with that tank off your 95? :norton

    haha... I'm already dreaming up ways to add fuel. Most of the current solutions I've seen so far look fine for slab cruising. I don't really like any of the tail mounted aux tanks for off road though. They all look like they would snap off. Maybe I don't want to run that much fuel off road anyway. How many miles can one of these bad boys get off 9 liters anyway? 80 miles or so?

    I have seen a few stock tanks for sale on ebay. I wonder if I could bring a raw stocker to someone who specializes in fiberglass or some type of molding that could clone the lower half so the tank fits but give the top some bubble effect to hold more?????
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  19. Trang

    Trang ... 2nd last to the Sweep

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  20. Trang

    Trang ... 2nd last to the Sweep

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    <CENTER><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=750 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width=565 bgColor=#ffffff>
    [​IMG]
    CYCLE TORQUE TEST: Y2000 HUSQVARNA TE610E
    </TD><TD width=185 bgColor=#ffffff>[​IMG]</TD></TR><TR><TD width=750 bgColor=#ffffff colSpan=2>[​IMG] </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></CENTER>
    <CENTER><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=738 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width=220 bgColor=#ffffff colSpan=2>[​IMG]</TD><TD width=530 bgColor=#ffffff colSpan=3>
    Test by Miles Davis. Photos by Nigel Paterson
    (Web Conversion by Glenn Alderton)

    Husqvarna is famed for its competition machinery, so it's no surprise to find its big-bore dual sport is very capable in the rough stuff...
    </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top width=252 bgColor=#ffffff><SMALL>IF YOU are looking for adventure and spend a lot of your time off-road the Husqvarna TE 610E is worth throwing a leg over. The TE-E is the Adventure version of Husky's mega enduro winning TE model, with an electric start and some other key features that make it much more suitable for longer distance riding.</SMALL> <SMALL>In this year's Australian Safari the TE 610 E placed first in the M2 class (over 400cc modified production) and took a very healthy third overall, showing exactly what it is capable of in very extreme conditions.</SMALL>
    <SMALL>There is a lot to be said for the versatility of the adventure touring bikes in Australia with our wideopen spaces and crap roads. Compared to some bikes in its class, the TE-E is light, well suspended and capable in the dirt.</SMALL>
    'The power... is
    smooth and
    balanced for a
    big single'
    <SMALL>The Bike</SMALL>
    <SMALL>This is the second year that Husky imports has offered the big electric start dual sport machine to the Aussie market, but the first time it has been fitted with the long distance 17 litre tank (up from nine). Hans Appelgren, the man behind Husky imports told Cycle Torque, "The change to the larger tank was brought around by dealer request. In the past sales had been lost due to the limited range of the smaller tank".</SMALL>​
    [​IMG]
    <SMALL><SMALL>The brakes and suspension are excellent for a dual purpose machine</SMALL></SMALL>
    <SMALL>Although the TE-E is based closely on the higher performance (kick-start) TE enduro model there are some serious differences that make each bike more suitable for their specific requirements. The motor on the TE-E has tighter tolerances and a much more thorough oil pump/filtration system (two pumps and two filters) for increased longevity and reduced service intervals. The compression ratio is lower, allowing the use of regular unleaded petrol, a must for a machine which will regularly find itself in the sticks. These changes result is a drop in the legendary grunt of the enduro weapon but see it gain smoother power, increased reliability and less frequent servicing. Some upgrades on the new model include improved starting thanks to advancing the auto-decompression mechanism so less compression builds up before ignition, and the gear ratio on the starter has been altered to make the motor spin more quickly.</SMALL>
    <SMALL>The suspension has also been upgraded. The 45mm forks now have compression and rebound damping adjustment capabilities, and the Sachs rear shock has rebound damping and preload adjustments, giving a much wider range of tuning. Bikes like this can be ridden over an extremely wide range of surfaces and being able to tune the suspension in seconds is a real plus in getting the most out of the machine. A softer seat foam is now used for more comfort whilst in the saddle, but the design was causing some wrinkles in the cover. It didn't seem to be a comfort issue but more of an aesthetic eyesore. Nice standard features are the stylish Acerbis hand-guards, great at keeping that cold winter morning air off your hands and the anti-vibration footpeg rubbers that increase highway comfort, especially in lighter footwear.</SMALL>

    </TD><TD vAlign=top width=1 bgColor=#ffffff> </TD><TD vAlign=top width=283 bgColor=#ffffff>
    [​IMG]
    <SMALL>The Ride</SMALL>
    <SMALL>The joys of electric start! On a machine like this there will be times when you don't have the full heavy duty boots on and can't it hurt to kick over a big bike with soft-soled shoes?</SMALL>
    <SMALL>The bike came supplied with a set of Trelleborg off-road tyres so the on-road test was limited to getting to the dirt. With the standard Metzler interrmediate Karuh tyres the TE-E would have been a much nicer proposition to wander down the south coast somewhere. Hans mentioned that most adventure bikes come standard with rubber rated at somewhere around 70 percent road and 30 percent dirt where the Metzelers are more of a true 50/50 tyre capable of riding more than a basic gravel road. On the road with knobbies the 610 felt quite comfortable at a casual pace. The size and mass of the bike (140kg dry) give a solid feel to the road but not something you would want to ride in the wet or over longer distances.</SMALL>
    <SMALL>The motor feels quite smooth and balanced for a big single. There is not an over abundance of power as this bike complies fully with ADR specs and felt a bit restricted. There are ways to extract more power, talk to your Husky dealer. The power is smooth and steady and makes the TE-E a real pleasure to cruise around on without feeling like it will get away from you, if you need to get around slower traffic you will have to use all the revs to build speed quickly.</SMALL>
    [​IMG]
    <SMALL><SMALL>Practical rear footpegs and helmet holder are nice touches</SMALL></SMALL>
    <SMALL>The gears shift positively although the action is not featherlight, the wide ratio gearing allows for healthy highway speeds: cruising at 130kmh the motor isn't even revving. Riding with a pillion is fine for shorter distances but not very practical for longer trips if the pillion is not a jockey; the seat's too small. The rack fitted on the rear guard behind the seat makes for a great grab bar for the pillion but can dig into their back side if they slide back over bumps or under acceleration.</SMALL>
    <SMALL>With between five to 10 litres of fuel in the tank the TE610E resembles a true off road machine. However, your riding style needs to adjust slightly to compensate for the 140-150kg weight (with fuel/oil etc); for an enduro bike the TE-E is on the heavy side, but for an adventure bike it's lightweight.</SMALL>
    [​IMG]
    </TD><TD vAlign=top width=24 bgColor=#ffffff> </TD><TD vAlign=top width=223 bgColor=#ffffff>
    <SMALL>Get onto some fast flowing smooth fire trails and the TE-E feels most at home. Especially with a set of hard terrain knobbies, this is where the Husky will leave most other adventure bikes in its wake. The power is smooth, the suspension is soft and supple and the brakes are great. Lofting the front wheel over small obstacles is as easy as leaning back and giving it a squirt, although you might want to use the clutch or downshift if it looks serious.</SMALL>
    <SMALL>It is definitely worth taking note that with a full tank of juice the bike will handle like a truck in technical terrain, there is just too much weight (fuel) over the front wheel to get through any bumpy terrain at any kind of a pace, especially with the ultra soft stock suspension. For what the TE610E is designed for, its handling is impressive in rougher terrain. I got to put the bike through its paces in some big sand dunes, and with less air in the knobbies, the results were again surprisingly good. The motor puts out great power at the back wheel, the handling was respectable, and two wheel drifting over the harder packed sand felt very controlled even with both feet on the pegs. With all that weight over the front, you could disconnect the front brake; engine braking with a little rear brake gave the most controlled results.</SMALL>​
    [​IMG]
    <SMALL><SMALL>Slides and wheelies are easy on the TE610E compared with most adventure bikes</SMALL></SMALL>
    <SMALL>Even playing a bit of silly buggers gave decent results:</SMALL>​
    '...suspension is soft and supple and the brakes are great...'
    <SMALL>second, third and sometimes fourth gear wheelies were happening from time to time, (as you do). In Husky's traditional yellow white and blue the TE-E looks sharp, and the twin alloy silencers look ominous from behind.</SMALL>
    <SMALL>The Last Word</SMALL>
    <SMALL>I can't imagine taking a Honda Dominator or the BMW F 650 through the same terrain as I took the Husky. It is a matter of what you are looking for in a machine, and what the machine is designed to do. For mainly on-road use there are better options but for a fabulous off-road bike that can do more, the Husqvarna TE610E delivers the goods. It fits in the lower middle of the range in terms of price, as adventure style bikes start at around $8500 and go up to around $15,000. Or more, like the Cagiva Gran Canyon at $17,500. The TE-E is $10450 + ORC, making it a lot of bike for the buck.</SMALL>
    >> Bike Specs
    Report courtesy of
    [​IMG]
    October 2000 issue. (www.cycletorque.com.au)
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></CENTER>​
    #20