Year 2000 era Husqvarna TE-610 Info Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Muggins, Nov 13, 2008.

  1. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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  2. supermoto690

    supermoto690 Adventurer

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    I know I told them it was left side drive.
  3. supermoto690

    supermoto690 Adventurer

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    Here it is fits perfectly

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  4. DrStomp

    DrStomp Lover of Husky things

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    Hey Rockaholic, you have any pics of your 2 into1 exhaust? Curious about how you did it. You use a TE450 2into1? I am in the process of converting mine into single. Fabbing a custom bracket to install the FMF 4.1 on the left side. I am thinking of buying another 2 into1 mid section from ebay or somewhere so I can cut it up and weld a new pipe into this muffler. The thought would be to keep the old one in case I want to go back to dual some day.
  5. alfred jorgensen

    alfred jorgensen Adventurer

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    On another note, a while back a rider was looking for a chain slider for a 1985 - 1986 Cagiva 650 Elefant on the EAB list. A fellow rider mentioned that you supposedly make up chain sliders and others chimed in saying that they would like to buy some too if that is the case. I chimed in saying that I believe I may have a brand new Cagiva chain slider for that bike and that I would look for it and revert. Well, as mentioned, that was a while back but I am about to reorganize my storage unit so I wanted to ask if you are interested in making a number of these chain sliders if I locate the NOS?
  6. alfred jorgensen

    alfred jorgensen Adventurer

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    Finally got around to procure the parts needed for the carburator, namely the micro-accelerator arm return spring which was bent and a few other bits and pieces. After getting the carburator correctly assembled this time around, the bike fired right up and idles and revs as normal (I have not ridden it yet because of excessive heat) . This is the first time I have had this particular carburator apart and I learned a lesson, it`s best to dismantle the throttle housing at the handlebar and take that end of the cable out to get maximum slack before attempting to reassemble the throttle slide /needle/cable/spring at the carburator end. This will also enable undertaking this procedure on a work bench which is advantageous since there are so many moving parts.

    I have had the throttle slide out many times (to adjust the needle position) on the trail on my 91 WXE 610 (many years ago) and do not remember having these many moving parts to deal with, of course that bike is a non-street legal enduro bike so that may be the explanation for the simpler carburator design (also a 40 mm Dellorto).

    Anyhow, I still had a nagging doubt about possibly having bent the exhaust valves so I looked in the factory shop manual and they state that compression can be checked using a pressure gauge in the spark plug hole and cranking the engine using the electric starter while holding the throttle open. The gauge is supposed to show a minimum of 8 Bars (113 PSI). They must assume that at full cranking speed the auto-decompression mechanism has disengaged!

    So I tried that this evening and with a well charged battery I achieved 80 PSI? I can explain about 10 percent of that difference by the fact that I live at nearly 3,500 feet of elevation, in other words an almost 10 percent lesser air density. However, the manual does not state whether the engine should be tested warm or cold which will also make a difference. The illustration accompanying the procedure shows the pressure gauge inserted into an engine which is out of the frame with no carburator attached so that looks like they assume a cold engine but that engine also has a plug in the air intake so that may just be an incorrect illustration?

    Has anybody done a compression test using this procedure and if so, what result did you get?
  7. alfred jorgensen

    alfred jorgensen Adventurer

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    After thinking about it for a while, I guess the automatic decompression mechanism is designed to close the exhaust valve(s) once the engine is spinning at near maximum cranking speed in order to provide enough compression pressure to start. Also, after thinking about it some more, on the single cam engine you cannot control the valves individually. In other words, the automatic decompression mechanism will keep both exhaust valves open when it`s active.

    That also explains why the manual states that it`s possible to test the compression pressure using the starter (with a well charged battery). It`s function is to allow the starter to spin up the flywheel (and all of the other rotating mass in the engine) without much compression load and then close in order to allow the compression pressure to rise by using the `flywheel` effect to keep the engine turning over at sufficient speed.

    In spite of having several bikes with automatic decompression mechanisms, I have never really given it much thought. I come from a background of using manual decompression mechanisms and kick start only so as long as it functions all is good. Well, if you are lucky you learn something every day.
  8. alfred jorgensen

    alfred jorgensen Adventurer

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    This also explains why I may have gotten lucky dropping a piece of plastic into the cylinder. The automatic decompression mechanism uses a fairly heavy spring to hold the exhaust valves a bit open when the engine is at a standstill. In a single cylinder engine the exhaust valve(s) are likely closed in standstill mode because of the valve spring(s) pressure against the cam shaft. So when I cranked the engine manually (and slowly) against the plastic piece, this spring may have given and allowed the valves to not try to recede when encountering the plastic piece?

    We will see once I have sorted out the reason for the lack of compression pressure. My money is on that the comprehension testing has to be carried out on a warm engine in spite of the `dubious` manuals instructions!
  9. Seekanddestroy

    Seekanddestroy Adventurer

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    Whats up guys, im another happy owner of a 2000 husky te610e, its an e start only CA plated dual sport. Glad to see a thread like this one going strong! Couple of questions for you guys, anyone know of a source for a good skid/bash guard. second question, i cant seem to find a definitive answer as to what foot pegs fit my model. Third question, my idle sensor is leaking oil and calls for a #9 oring part# 8A00 42700, anyone happen to know the size?. Thanks in advance! (BTW i read all 40 pages of this thread last night, great stuff!)
  10. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    I'm thinking if the engine now runs well after e carb. work, you may be out of the woods.
  11. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    Shoot me a PM if you want a skid plate like this ( no perf. screen over gun sight though and no mounting hardwear):
    [​IMG]

    Idle sensor????? Got pic of this?
  12. Seekanddestroy

    Seekanddestroy Adventurer

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    Screenshot_2017-09-11-17-23-42.png Idle transponder #13 is the sensor and the o-ring is #9, that is where i believe the leak is coming from.

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  13. KDB

    KDB Adventurer

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    I bought a 2000 te new (Cagiva made) and raced it for 10 years before selling. I loved the bike despite some flaws like the clutch over heating in tight terrain and if I fell off it was a pain to restart using all my energy up.
    Another thing, if I tore the bike down for cleaning and maintenance (after every event) the Dellorto carb had to be pre loaded with fuel before going on the bike or no amount of kicking or push starting would get fuel through. The motor was never taken apart, always run like a charm till the day I sold it with oil changes after every event and remember the stock 17t counter sprocket would have been good for 160kph but never race with that. The Marzocchi Sachs suspension was better than my current WR450. God I loved that bike I regret selling it.

    Some sales pic's after owning it 10 years, i've got many more.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Seekanddestroy likes this.
  14. alfred jorgensen

    alfred jorgensen Adventurer

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    The illustration you are showing is the `neutral switch`, in other words it`s a switch that only allows the engine to start if the transmission is in neutral. I do not know what size the O-ring is but any well stocked bearing/seal shop that carries metric will likely have it. Otherwise, you can try Hall`s Husqvarna, they carry a lot of stuff for this model.

    With regards to the foot-pegs, I have the Pivot-Pegs on my TE 630 i.e. and it uses the same pegs and mounts as the TE 610 e. Initially the Pivot-Pegs feel like you have a `loose` peg but once you get used to them they are great, especially if you have big feet like me. They also allow better control of the rear brake pedal since you can just pivot your foot forward and apply the brake.
    Seekanddestroy likes this.
  15. alfred jorgensen

    alfred jorgensen Adventurer

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    Hopefully, tonight I tested the compression pressure with the engine warming up for 7 - 8 minutes at fast idle before testing and got 90 PSI, so 10 PSI more than with a cold engine. So if I add 10 percent for altitude compensation, I am right below 100 PSI versus the manuals stated value of 113 PSI (new engine).

    I do not believe that the difference is due to bent exhaust valves anymore but likely wear on the top end. Since `upgrading` the forks in 2002 I lost the speedometer/odometer drive, I have an electronic speedometer/odometer but it does not retain cumulative mileage so I really do not know how many miles are on the engine?

    Since moving to Nevada in early 2002, this bike was not used much until my brother stayed with me from late 2010 until late 2013 when he rode it from time to time. The reason it was not used much is because of the limited fuel capacity,even equipped with the larger Acerbis tank that Husky was selling back then (that tank was standard on the Australian models but not in the ROW).

    This tank was sold as a 4.15 (U.S.) gallon tank (I believe) but in reality it is only about a 3.5 - 3.6 gallon tank because the `wings` are below the pet cock level. In other words, there is about 0.6 gallon of fuel that you cannot access unless you can hold a wheelie for a long time, what a design blunder by Acerbis! I do have an Acerbis 4.5 gallon tank on my 91 WXE 610 and it is a true 4.5 gallon tank (I have seen larger versions of that tank on a couple of Huskies at the Acerbis Nevada Rally in 95). The 4.15 gallon version looks just like them so that fooled me until I ran out of gas unexpectedly, bummer.

    Since I have a 97 KTM Adventure with a (real) 7.5 gallon tank it was the bike of choice for years when heading into the Nevada back-country where you often have to be able to go 200 + miles between filling stations so the TE 610 e did not get much use. Nowadays, I use the TE 630 i.e. with a Safari Tank and with fuel injection I can get 300 + miles between fill-ups so no problem.

    So the TE 610 e engine probably has significant wear on the top end (in spite of not having been used much for years) but if it feels like it did this spring (when I finally get to ride it again, we are still in triple digit temperatures), I am not going to mess with it anytime soon.

    However, I do have one question, I know that the TE 610 e engine is de-tuned relative to the TE 610 with lower a compression ratio and a milder cam. I noticed right out of the gate when I got the TE 610 e (with about 600 miles on it back in 2001), that it was down on power relative to the 91 WXE 610.

    I believe the reason is that the TE 610 e was aimed at the light-weight street Enduro market in Europe when it was launched in 1998 and in order to comply with emission regulations (and probably also to ensure a longer life) Cagiva choose to de-tune the engine relative to the competition models. Once they got better at meeting the emission regulations (and probably also gained confidence in the engine`s new mission as a street bike) they bumped up the power several times in the early 2000's. Fast by Ferracci used to sell a high compression piston and cam kit for the 1998 - 2002 models but I doubt it`s still available.

    Anyhow, the reason I am going on about this, is that I would not be terribly surprised if the 113 PSI compression pressure that Cagiva states in the manual is really for the TE 610 (competition model), that would just be classic Cagiva screw-up. They were great at building bikes (still are I guess in the form of MV Augusta) but never great at documentation!

    Trouble is that I will probably never know because you cannot test a kick start only bike the same way .....................................
  16. alfred jorgensen

    alfred jorgensen Adventurer

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    Hopefully, tonight I tested the compression pressure with the engine warming up for 7 - 8 minutes at fast idle before testing and got 90 PSI, so 10 PSI more than with a cold engine. So if I add 10 percent for altitude compensation, I am right below 100 PSI versus the manuals stated value of 113 PSI (new engine).

    I do not believe that the difference is due to bent exhaust valves anymore but likely wear on the top end. Since `upgrading` the forks in 2002 I lost the speedometer/odometer drive, I have an electronic speedometer/odometer but it does not retain cumulative mileage so I really do not know how many miles are on the engine?

    Since moving to Nevada in early 2002, this bike was not used much until my brother stayed with me from late 2010 until late 2013 when he rode it from time to time. The reason it was not used much is because of the limited fuel capacity,even equipped with the larger Acerbis tank that Husky was selling back then (that tank was standard on the Australian models but not in the ROW).

    This tank was sold as a 4.15 (U.S.) gallon tank (I believe) but in reality it is only about a 3.5 - 3.6 gallon tank because the `wings` are below the pet cock level. In other words, there is about 0.6 gallon of fuel that you cannot access unless you can hold a wheelie for a long time, what a design blunder by Acerbis! I do have an Acerbis 4.5 gallon tank on my 91 WXE 610 and it is a true 4.5 gallon tank (I have seen larger versions of that tank on a couple of Huskies at the Acerbis Nevada Rally in 95). The 4.15 gallon version looks just like them so that fooled me until I ran out of gas unexpectedly, bummer.

    Since I have a 97 KTM Adventure with a (real) 7.5 gallon tank it was the bike of choice for years when heading into the Nevada back-country where you often have to be able to go 200 + miles between filling stations so the TE 610 e did not get much use. Nowadays, I use the TE 630 i.e. with a Safari Tank and with fuel injection I can get 300 + miles between fill-ups so no problem.

    So the TE 610 e engine probably has significant wear on the top end (in spite of not having been used much for years) but if it feels like it did this spring (when I finally get to ride it again, we are still in triple digit temperatures), I am not going to mess with it anytime soon.

    However, I do have one question, I know that the TE 610 e engine is de-tuned relative to the TE 610 with lower a compression ratio and a milder cam. I noticed right out of the gate when I got the TE 610 e (with about 600 miles on it back in 2001), that it was down on power relative to the 91 WXE 610.

    I believe the reason is that the TE 610 e was aimed at the light-weight street Enduro market in Europe when it was launched in 1998 and in order to comply with emission regulations (and probably also to ensure a longer life) Cagiva choose to de-tune the engine relative to the competition models. Once they got better at meeting the emission regulations (and probably also gained confidence in the engine`s new mission as a street bike) they bumped up the power several times in the early 2000's. Fast by Ferracci used to sell a high compression piston and cam kit for the 1998 - 2002 models but I doubt it`s still available.

    Anyhow, the reason I am going on about this, is that I would not be terribly surprised if the 113 PSI compression pressure that Cagiva states in the manual is really for the TE 610 (competition model), that would just be classic Cagiva screw-up. They were great at building bikes (still are I guess in the form of MV Augusta) but never great at documentation!

    Trouble is that I will probably never know because you cannot test a kick start only bike the same way .....................................
  17. Seekanddestroy

    Seekanddestroy Adventurer

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    Thank you sir. Popped it off and went to the bearing shop and they had exactly what i needed. I also read up on pivot pegs and they seem like a great product and would totally run them but the 200+ price tag is a bit hefty for me at the moment.
  18. alfred jorgensen

    alfred jorgensen Adventurer

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    Yeah,, they are pricey!
  19. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    OK, that's the old translation discrepancy issue that is common. That is the "natural light switch". I don't have the size of the #9 O ring but measure the cross-section of the O ring then the diameter of the surface the ID of the O ring seals on and that is the size. Example .2MM x 20MM. Nothing special on the O ring material. One for a faucet will work.
  20. fritzcoinc

    fritzcoinc Enjoying my last V8

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    Your kidding, right?
    LOL
    The common thing about Italian motorcycle manufactures is that they outsource their technical manual translation to a third world country that still rides goats.

    Did you change forks because of seal leaks or to have USD forks?