Yellowknife ice trucking

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by squonker, Sep 18, 2007.

  1. Unique458

    Unique458 Been here awhile

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    Left this morning from MT and made it to Edmonton at 11:00pm
  2. Unique458

    Unique458 Been here awhile

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    Driving a 99 t 600 ( I think ) with 1.6 mil km 425 cat and a 13 speed
  3. Pro Mover

    Pro Mover Truck Pilot

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    A decent winter front, spare cardboard to MacGyver something, and a good thermal blanket for your tanks and batteries works -- of course, making sure that the electrical system is up to snuff is key. A good shop/wrench-swinger who knows how to winterize properly can make sure to clean up all elec connections, douse them in dilectic gel, swap out the fluids for synth (that helps a LOT with cold weather vs viscosity!).

    As stated too, different systems have different quirks about them. You will likely need to tweak and adjust and learn.

    Cannot be overstated, that the more FANCY solution you go for, the more likely it is to FAIL, and at the worst possible time. Winter fronts/thermal blankets have no moving parts, and for tank wraps/battery covers, once wired in correctly, almost zero maint except keeping them clean.

    The heated fluids return works (if the mfg system worked) well, and as stated, better than anti-gel for the most part, but carrying some never hurts either.

    The TRUTH about cold being too cold and freezing metal cannot be overstated, shit just starts to snap and shatter once you reach a critical temperature -- as Squonker stated, plow blades snap/shatter, lug nuts crack, and any small critical part with a manufacturer's flaw that cannot be easily replaced and is 2 weeks away in TimBukThree will find a way to expire at the most inconvenient time...

    For the most part, older is better, as there are less "untested" things that can break. Mechanical has the advantage over computerized, insofar as us crashbox jockeys and amateur wrench-swingers can beat on it without needing a computer degree! ;-)
  4. ChazCable

    ChazCable Mechanic

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    mmmm, 425 mechanical,

    beautiful trucks those Scanias Squonker

    From a mechanics point of view (which I would be when i gets up there, 2014 maybe?), the Cats are nice to work on, even the new ones, 60 serise are nice too, not too familar with cummins,

    Still tryin to figure why Macks are so prone to freezing up there?
  5. gsd4me

    gsd4me 90% bluff

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    Plenty of room to fit a big sleeper. :D



    [​IMG]
  6. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    ^^ A little heavy on the tare weight though! ^^
  7. gsd4me

    gsd4me 90% bluff

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    I've always like the look of that particular model, and of course, the note from the V8 is great.

    As you run the engines all the time when out in the field, do you just idle them or up the revs a bit? On the Volvo`s and Scania`s, I put the cruise control up to about 700rpm when sitting, so the GPS won't pick up prolonged idle time.
  8. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    I always idle up as a matter of principle, it brings the oil pressure up, eases the 'strain' of idling (high compression engines don't like to idle), plus on the ice it keeps the temps up. On the winter road I use 900 rpm as a 'base', and bring the revs up from there if I need to. I think occasionally I've had to have them as high as 1200 just to keep the coolant temp in operating range, but not very often.

    Here in southern B.C. under 'normal' conditions I usually bring the rpms up to about 700. It not only helps with the oil pressure (as mentioned above), but if a truck has one of those automatic anti-idling things that shuts your rig down after 5 mins, using the high idle will override that.
  9. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    When my dad started working for PIE, he got the shit scared out of him by the automatic idle control. He was taking a roadside nap and the idle control suddenly raised the engine speed. He said he bolted upright, thinking he'd fallen asleep while driving, and it took him a second to figure out what was going on.
  10. Unique458

    Unique458 Been here awhile

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    Well here i sit at the motel in Edmonton again, thankfully it will be the last night, tomorrow we head to the yard to pickup our trailers and from there we head north, today was spent finishing up safety's on the trucks, and a few other nik nak,s.

    I heard that the ice road is ready now, the portages are a bit rough, they haven't had a lot of snow this year, so they are hauling snow from the lakes to fill in the holes on portages.
    I will be hauling to the Diavik mine this year.

    I am glad that i was able to keep busy the last few days, there was not much to do, but there was some stuff to get done and it killed of some time each day.

    The past few days have been cold out here - 30's and -40's
  11. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    Thanks for checking in! Glad that you managed to keep busy and I hope that everything goes smoothly for your trip north. I assume that the trailers you will hauling to YK will be full?

    A friend in Yellowknife texted earlier this evening to say that it is currently -42c there - they may be lacking in snow but they sure have the temps to build a good road!
  12. gsd4me

    gsd4me 90% bluff

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    So then, what sort of truck are you driving, and what is your opinion of it? I thought you just hooked up to whatever trailer was ready to go at the loading area, and didn't use your own.
  13. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    That's one difference between hauling fuel and freight. Fuel haulers will, as a rule, have the same set of trailers all season. Fill them up, take them to the mine and empty them. Drive empty back to the rack and to re-fill, then repeat...!
  14. gsd4me

    gsd4me 90% bluff

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    Ah, OK, I didn't realise he was doing tanker work.
  15. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    ...trying very hard to bite my tongue here.....:lol3
  16. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    Anybody ever try to make a hollow plow blade that could have hot air blown through it to keep the steel from getting too cold? It'd need to be enough below freezing to not have snow and ice stick to it, but warm enough to not be brittle. Maybe -10C would work.
  17. gsd4me

    gsd4me 90% bluff

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    Please explain?...... :dunno
  18. Drif10

    Drif10 Accredited Jackass

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    Last week I had a run out of Alexandria, 3 hours east of me. 0600 Thursday tee time, finish Friday aft.

    Forecast for Wed nite there was -50 windchill. Old Freight that was a spare truck, didn't run much.

    Go up early Thurs like they wanted? Yeah, right. Done a lot of time in the Artic, so I went up after supper Wed eve.

    Truck rolled over 4 times, click, click, click... call in a mobile, get it fired with some juice, lots of conditioner in the tanks. 3 hours to get it running, brakes unfroze, an hour to pound the ice off the fifth wheel and get it working, pinned, trailer unfroze...you know the drill. I was one cold puppy when I bunked up.

    Go to leave 6 hours later, and it won't do over 50k. On a down hill. Lines still froze. Limp it 90 minutes to Cornwall (a 48 km run), and all the shops are booked, solid. "Maybe next week..." was heard a lot. Let the company push the buttons, they got it into a shop, lost 8 hours on the day. Things did not get much better from there.


    I don't miss artic ops.

    Not a bit.
  19. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    Nothing about what you said, David - I originally wrote a comment on the old 'fuel haulers Vs freight haulers' thing but deleted it and wrote what you quoted instead :D
  20. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    Bloody hell! Good on you for going in early, you got grief but a lot less grief than you would have had if you had turned up when they told you to. Did you have the opportunity to speak to your boss and say,"Wtf"?