Your favorite Macgyver moments\tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HaChayalBoded, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. Bigsteve

    Bigsteve Total Gear Nerd

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4
    Location:
    Albuquerque NM
    My hydraulic clutch failed on a 73 Triumph Spitfire I had. I wandered up and down the road and found some bread ties, a spray can cap, a McDonalds napkin...and part of a circuit card from a Volvo instrument cluster!? The only tool I had was a pair of pliers.

    I knew I would probably only manage to round off bolts and fittings with it, the layout of hardware was nasty and tight. I decided that if I just held on real tight and leaned on the hardware instead of trying to get a turn the time might help. It did, but the worst bolt (under the master cylinder and inside a narroww bracket) took several tries of a minute or two each. Pretty exhausting.

    I used the napkin to sop fluid out the master and squeezed it into the cap which I also used to catch the drip from the pipe fittings. Once the master cylinder was out things got much easier.

    It turned out the return spring had corroded in the middle and collapsed around itself and interfered with the check valve as well. I stripped the plastic off the bread wrapper ties and laced the spring back together. It took a long long time to do this. I had barely enough fluid on hand to wet the bottom of the fuid cup so really could not bleed the thing. But it was enough to shift gears by double clutching and get me home. I did all of this in the dark too and ended up getting home just 40 minutes before I had to be at work. Pretty exhausting but I think I'm most proud of that McGyver moment.
  2. Patriot4570

    Patriot4570 Trail Blaster

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2002
    Oddometer:
    2,777
    Location:
    First Coast
    In Portugal one year I had trouble finding a euro adapter for my cell phone charger.I went to a store and got a small multimeter the kind that has leads and you can check voltages with. I went back to my room and could not find a knife except for a plastic one. I had a disposable razor so I cut the wires on the leads to the multimeter so I could wrap them around the holes on the charger. After wrapping the wires I inserted the metal part of the leads in the wall outlet to charge the phone.
  3. Trust

    Trust I'll fix that

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,513
    Location:
    pines & sand, NC
    I don't recall if it was this thread or not, but someone suggested using washers to fill the spaces between turns in a spring, compressing the shaft (whatever the spring was springing), and just removing the spring simply that way - without it shooting off into space. I finally got to try it, and thought the pictures may be helpful:

    Before (springs packed with coins, now kickstand moved to shorten spring length)
    <img src="http://lh4.ggpht.com/_oMAPqLHZ3WA/SlAsw9agY2I/AAAAAAAABdY/5nEjjkhxiQQ/s800/DSCN1309.JPG">


    After (Spring conveniently removed, with coins still packed, ready to reattach later with minimal problem)
    <img src="http://lh5.ggpht.com/_oMAPqLHZ3WA/SlD2xw5Vv7I/AAAAAAAABeA/YX8V6FbDP4U/s800/DSCN1310.JPG">
  4. kitesurfer

    kitesurfer Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,686
    Location:
    north florida
    back in highschool (40 years ago), my brother in law and i went fishing. there was an old boat there made from two old 40 model for truck hoods. we lifted it to set it in the water and a thousand snakes came out and into the water--more than 3 but less than a thousand, but u get the picture. so we're usiing two old boards for paddles and 5 minutes in the water and the bboat is leaking. my brother in law touched the leaky weld spot and the leak became a hole! so he stuffed his gum into it and it satopped the leak. wae fished for awhile until the gum got hard and had to be replaced. DID I MENTION THAT THERE WERE SNAKES EVERYWHERE AROUND THAT POND!
  5. catzass

    catzass Triple Pilot

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    387
    Location:
    Sedalia, Misery
    I think this is what you call "penny tech" :rofl
  6. xtop20A

    xtop20A Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,599
    Location:
    grants ass oregon, er, pass
    cool idear/method,will quarteres werk ?,what aboot nikles ?
  7. Trust

    Trust I'll fix that

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,513
    Location:
    pines & sand, NC
    Anything the correct thickness works, even use washers. I have more coins around washers, use what ya got, ride what ya brung...
  8. Motoriley

    Motoriley Even my posing is virtual

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,686
    Location:
    Deepest darkest burbs of Montreal
    Doing my daily loose fastener check on my KLR on the Trans Labrador highway. It had actually been a couple of days, so of course I found one bolt missing and another loose. Didn't have the right size wrench....slipped a coin in the loose space between the wrench and bolt head and worked like a charm. Sent that in to the BMW ON and they used it in the Touring Tips section...I left out the KLR part though...
  9. mhaas

    mhaas intrpd travlrwanabe

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    193
    Location:
    Greenville SC
    I used to drive a 16' C60(?) flatbed truck around the DC metro area delivering construction equipment. About once a month an air line would split due to corosion from its early life a quarry truck. Having the rear tires lock as the air dumps in I95 rush traffic is fun.
    Duct tape, ballpoint pens, safty wire and any thing else I could find in the ditch of the moment. Only had to get towed once when the compresser went solid.
  10. xtop20A

    xtop20A Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,599
    Location:
    grants ass oregon, er, pass
    ok, this was about when the eagles hotel california album came out,we all were camping and riding out of camp ellindale on forest hwy 7 out of elk creek north cal...great time was being had by all except for a dairy farmer friend of mine from orland...he had an old bultaco,proly an early matador ? i dunno it was long ago..any way not anybody that i know dropped their jetting for the alt. 3,ooo+ exspecially the friend with the claped out bul ! it was running richer than a jew in a jewelry store,wouldn't even come close to cleaning out WOT,well it was a 2 day deal and i got idea after remembering i had red loctite in my toolbox....long to short i used i think a paper clip wire to undersize the main-jet with the loctite as a filler,i think i even had the presence of mind to coat the wire with a bit of grease to act as mold release !! next morning after droping the needle as well,re-adjusted low speed screw,man that old bultaco roosted all day like it never had !! i know you may call bullshit on this but,fukit it happened and i'll never forget how happy dude was that day...now the rest of the story of course back at the ranch he never re-jetted and siezed that motor titer than you know what !!
  11. Hay

    Hay Norwegian

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    45
    Location:
    Norway
    :poser :poser :poser :poser :poser :poser :poser
  12. Dano 407

    Dano 407 One Man Wolfpack

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,455
    Location:
    The orange groves, CA
    Last week I had to caulk the seams of the saw cuts in my shop floor. At about 300 linear feet, I had to have a plan. When I was done, I had used a tapered section of Carbon Fiber golf club shaft, the barrel of a Sharpie pen, some glue, a small drill bit and a length of duct tape to fashion a slip-on extendion for the caulk tube that squirted the sealer directly into the crack. I then sat on my creeper and rolled around the shop for a few hours with my kids help to wipe the joints clean.
    My sons then saw grandpas work on his driveway and said that "ours looks WAY better".
    Do I get bonus points for impressing the kids?
  13. Wreck™

    Wreck™ Wreck™

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    360
    Location:
    Riverton, NJ
    In the 80's I was engineer on a large private sailboat, after installing some newfangled 12V DC flourescent lights we discovered that when turned on they would often turn some of the TV's off or on.

    They gave off crazy radio when starting.
  14. Haasenpfeffer

    Haasenpfeffer Training wheels R off

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Highlands Ranch, CO
    :rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl
  15. byker

    byker Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Toronto
    While on a trip to West Virginia, my buddies 1200GS developed a leak around the valve stem as it exited the rim. Not haveing a spare valve and nowhere in site to find one, I used crazy glue to make the repair. After airing up the tire, we rode another 5 days and 3000 kilometers without a problem. Always carry crazy glue!
  16. Zecatfish

    Zecatfish XTique Rider

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,927
    Location:
    Arkansas USA
    Obsolete gaskets, like float bowl gaskets, if you careful applying it in a thin bead and let it setup over night to 24 hours. Shoe Goop can be used to replace the wasted/missing gasket.
    Do not put it together till its setup OR you will play hell getting back apart. :evil
  17. svejkovat

    svejkovat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    856
    Another one for the super glue. When I discovered that bulk oring is mated with a glue that is essentially cyanoacrylate I started using it on other broken gaskets in a pinch. Even a flat fiber gasket can be mended quite well enough to "get home" if it's glued right where the torn faces mate and then put back into use. Super glue works suprisingly well even in dirty and oily conditions.

    Ok, one more super glue. Along with a tube of the stuff in my toolkit I also carry a dispenser of unwaxed dental floss. Wrapping, knotting, and soaking with super glue you can make some pretty imaginative and amazingly strong permanent and temporary repairs to things.
  18. Transalp Jas

    Transalp Jas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    807
    Location:
    Corner Brook,NL
    THe superglue and floss is a VERY interesting idea- even better if it works.
  19. svejkovat

    svejkovat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    856
    First time i used that was on a nearly broken fiberglass fishing rod in the seventies. The rod itself had snapped but not separated. I noticed that the eyelet guides on the pole were basically fastened with layered thread underneath the fiberglass resin. Not having glass thread and two part fiberglass resin on hand I just figured I could approximate it with dental floss and superglue. Back then superglue was the coolest thing since the moon landing and we were trying it on everything we could think of. The fishing pole still works just fine!.

    A variation is to mend two sections of cracked flat plastic material. There is a similar photo in a thread here on wirewrapping skills.
    [​IMG]

    You drill holes on either side of the crack sufficient to sew the panel together tightly with dental floss and then duab in two part epoxy on both sides to soak into the holes and the floss. Superglue works good too for very small versions of this but is too thin to give much structural support to larger mends. In the photo above the holes are drilled (or melted with a hot pin) in a line on either side of the fracture. But for better strength they should be slightly staggered in a zig zag instead of a line. A straight stitch is fine for fabric, but any straight line of holes in a rigid panel is going produce a "perf line" just waiting to be refractured.

    I've got a few examples of this still going strong on panels, toys, covers, guards. Funny thing is that it is about as aesthetically unpleasing as it gets on an otherwise well groomed and maintained machine, but if you look at it like a stitched battle scar (exactly how it looks after epoxying), it actually looks pretty cool. And it costs about 1/200 the price of a new part.

    Related to above (honest, I don't sell this stuff) is if you ever notice a stitch in clothing, shoes, seats, apholstery, etc, loosening or broken immediately put a small drop of superglue on either side where the thread continues into the fabric. It'll hold up like this indefinitely until you can get it mended properly.

    (and since we're talking Macgyver and not Heloise here, I'll give this up for now)
  20. Transalp Jas

    Transalp Jas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    807
    Location:
    Corner Brook,NL
    Sweet! Gotta try some of that sometime.