Your favorite Macgyver moments\tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HaChayalBoded, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. ptero

    ptero Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Oddometer:
    560
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    the Great Lake State
    Going back to the posts about breaking beads... Sorry if I missed it, but didn't see any posts about this... Many years ago I had heard of breaking a bead using a second bike's sidestand. Then I had a chance to try it - on a trip w/friends. It was the rear off a 93 Kbike at the time.

    I had a flat in front of the Lincoln Memorial at the huge bus loading area. Tried plugs but it wouldn't hold air w/even multiple plugs longer than a half-hour. That got us to a friend's house at least. We pulled the wheel and lined up a friend's bike next to the wheel on the ground. It took a couple people to lean the bike right to raise the sidestand high enough to get the wheel w/flat under it.

    Then we leaned the weight of the bike on the rubber, just missing the rim itself. It popped pretty easily. Snazzy. No real MacGuyvering, but a great solution. :clap

    Since the only tire available in this garage was a slightly used GS tire, that bike forever became my 93 K1100GS! It fit fine and ran fine - loved it. :evil:evil:evil
  2. arcanum

    arcanum Been here awhile

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    A perfectly useable tire spoon is the small Harbor Freight brake adjusting tool made for drum brakes. I bought 5 of them at $1.10 per each. Yes,I tried the zip tie and other methods,but I keep going back to using spoons for my narrow rims.
    Simply drill the tool in the appropriate spot and use a string or wire to hold it to a spoke...
  3. scooteraug02

    scooteraug02 Dog Rancher

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    Feb 18, 2003
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    Atlanta, GA
    Hit a rock with the right valve cover of my old GS. Oil was leaking out and I was far from anywhere. My friend had a piece of foam rubber that we wedged up against the hole. It kept the oil in to got me 100 miles home.

    A lot of other things would work you just have to have them with you.


    Bead breaking

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    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=145079

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    Fast way to inflate your tire.

    <iframe width="420" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/_meTPTpdkZo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  4. Daamud

    Daamud Life is like a box of Old Milwaukee

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    Lots of people do it (I use starting fluid), but be VERY CAREFUL.

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/_3_PMhBa_-c" allowfullscreen="" width="640" frameborder="0" height="390"></iframe>
  5. tomdubz

    tomdubz getting there

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    Jun 29, 2010
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    POW
    Couldn't find my oil filter wrench 'cause I'm a slob. So, I made it sticky with some double sided tape, wrapped my belt around it a few times, and pulled it like the lawnmower. The best part was when it spun off entirely and splashed down into the pan pool. Good times in the driveway.
  6. Range Motorsport

    Range Motorsport Junk collector

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    Nov 17, 2007
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    1,652
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    Da UP Eh!
    Using my KTM tool kit to fix a Buell shifter linkage that broke.

    Yes it worked, in fact it worked so well it was used for a full week after I made it until we had the parts to fix it.

    [​IMG]
  7. (none)

    (none) poser

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    Jan 25, 2007
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    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio

    from the looks of it, thats a split rim wheel, big different from what is commonly used today.
  8. broncobowsher

    broncobowsher Long timer

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    I was thinking that it was a widow maker split rim. You can see the rim seperating when it blows.
    My worst starting fluid tire seating incident was reseating a itty bitty trialer tire that was dry rotted and been off the bead for who knows how may years. Spray, light, pop, add air. First 3 went OK, adding air resulted in a few little blow torches of fire shooting out between the bead and the tire for a few seconds. My guess is the tire finally melted onto the rim sealing it (it held air when done), but the flames shooting out while putting air in were spooky. Good thing I had a good pair of gloves on when doing it.
  9. Daamud

    Daamud Life is like a box of Old Milwaukee

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    :lol3

    I had a set of Super Swamper tires seat fine, but the air inside would cool quicker than I could put air in, sucking the tire back off its bead. :lol3

    Ended up pushing the rim to one side of the tire and filling the void on the other side with grease. Then just filled with air. It worked fairly well.
  10. scmopar

    scmopar Been here awhile

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    a ratchet strap arond the outside of the tire works good too also a tire tool twisted into the strap gets that little extra omp to get the bead to touch the rim
  11. grizzzly

    grizzzly The Pre-Banned Version

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    <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--> i know i have posted this before but



    How to set a bead on a tire
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    One of the many problems with using starting fluid
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  12. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    That's from the "If a little is good, more is better, and too much is just right" school of technology. You want it to pop, not burn. More air, less fuel.
  13. Idle

    Idle Been here awhile

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    Jun 16, 2011
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    Northern California
    Rubber splicing tape works well for damn near anything. To solve the issue of it unraveling you can glue the end with rubber cement. Or wrap a cut thin piece of gorrila tape on it. Or wrap it a little thinner at the end and roll it back on itself. You can wrap it to secure wires or cable and then roll it into an o-ring. Works well for securing my mirrors wrapped around the ball and socket. I pulled the boot back, wrapped it then put the boot back on.

    The cheaper stuff (3m) sticks to itself better than scotch brand and doesn't unravel, but will tear if you stretch it too much.
  14. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    I forgot where I saw this, but apparently they use this method to repair tie rod ends in Bolivia.
  15. tgeliot

    tgeliot Topher

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    3M is Scotch. Same company.
  16. marchyman

    marchyman Cam Killer

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    Jun 30, 2005
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    7,690
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    SF Bay Area
    :nod 3M Scotch® 33+ is probably the best there is. It is also probably the most expensive. Good in the hot, the cold, indoors, outdoors, and doesn't leave any residue when removed. Learned that from my favorite electrician (dad).
  17. Idle

    Idle Been here awhile

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    Yea, I thought for a second after I wrote that.

    The roll I have now says 3m on it. It's got a white backing and will tear if streched too much. You can't undo it a day later. It has to be cut off. The stuff with the blue backing (33+?) is better but needs to be wrapped so it doesn't unravel.



    I could see a whole roll of it securing a tie rod to get you home. On Bolivia's "death road" maybe a roll and a half…
  18. Kenno

    Kenno Been here awhile

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    Jul 11, 2011
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    Might add a couple here that got me (and someone else) out of the shit over the years, I have more but total recall is slipping.

    Solution 1. Stuck in a dinghy 6 miles from the coast in choppy seas with a broken outboard gear selector- basic toolkit on board for the 10hp johnson just like a bike kit plus a broken hacksaw blade I have always had in my toolbag-open the gearbox,lift the gears out, measure spacer needed to hold the bevel gear against the pinion and set to work cutting the sparkplug spanner to the right length with the bit of hacksaw blade, install it over the prop shaft and bolt up the gearbox then start it in gear, whoops it's in reverse you dickhead! 6 miles home astern! :huh

    Solution 2. On my way to a gold prospecting patch between Port Hedland and Roebourne (Western Australia) and see a city type with his young son broken down in an alfaromeo, car had boiled and cooked the head, water leaked out of everywhere when we tried to top it up, no worries, off I go into the scrub on foot and return with some dried out kangaroo shit and grind it to dust into the radiator fill, bloke looks worried, it'll get you to the next town mate I say, give it a top of of water while running the engine and the leaks start to take up, off you go matey, saw him a week later still running around with the car until parts turned up, he never forgot the help, it was a 45 degree celsius day in the days before mobile phones.
    Never thought this fix would have a place in a bike garage but it will get those pumpers home too, sheep shit is just as good.

    Solution 3. Besides gear lever visegrips you can use them as a clutch lever as well, done it a few times in varying degrees of lever detachment, i get the mid or mini size grips.

    iSaw (inmate) just did a dandy patchup for my destroyed xr600 clutch lever and perch using cable ties when I off'ed and broke my arm recently, it was so good I was going to keep riding with it in his honour but I bought a new outfit in the end.
  19. Kenno

    Kenno Been here awhile

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    Bloody oath, its good stuff for patching split or damaged radiator hoses after cleaning the outside with petrol(gas) and letting it dry before stretching in on.
  20. mike-s

    mike-s 2 squeaky wheels

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    609
    Location:
    Sydney, Aus
    http://www.rescuetapeaustralia.com.au/
    This stuff is brilliant, got three rolls of it here i bought at the sydney bike show a couple of years ago. Two of the rolls I can account for, i have no idea where #3 went (i won't use it "just in case" i need it when out and about.

    I did a search to find the above URL and even found that the likes of jaycar stock it! Stuff is worth getting, if for no other reason as an insurance policy.