Your favorite Macgyver moments\tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HaChayalBoded, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. 42

    42 Bokononist

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    18,095
    Location:
    New York
    Worked great on my gas tank. Gave my knees something to grip.

    [​IMG]
  2. jknight611

    jknight611 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    78
    Location:
    South Coast of the USA
    On an unsupported solo camping trip on my Ural Tourist I made a midnight ride to the "bathhouse" to..... Well in the AM the bike just wouldn't run smoothly. After a brief inspection I saw that I had kicked the right carb and the rubber on the carb mount had split. I found a guy in a very old RV that had a bit of dried up Permatex. So I cut the seam on the bottom of my T shirt, squished the sealer into it, then removed the clamp wrapped the bandage around the compliance boot let it dry, it ran fine for the next 600 miles till I could get home and replace the rubber flange. Carry a spare now....

    Jay
  3. svejkovat

    svejkovat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    856
    Came across a guy stranded on the roadside one evening. I was in my car, He was standing next to an older BMW airhead. I stopped to see what was wrong. Out of gas. Angry at himself for having the petcock on reserve all the while so he'd screwed himself out of getting the last few miles to get to a station. His bike was set up like my own with one petcock on the left hand side. There was a ditch next to the road. I wheeled the bike parallel to and on the edge of the ditch and told him that between the two of us we were going to tip the one third of a gallon of gas remaining in the right tank saddle into the left. Besides being quicker and easier than scrounging around for a siphon tube of some sort or removing the tank and wrangling with the fuel lines it just felt more 'macgyver'. Not particularly brilliant but it worked and he'd never even realized that gas was in there. Got him back on the road and pretty surely to a station.
  4. Wlfman

    Wlfman Long timer

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    Sep 6, 2011
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    TN/AL
    That's the Reserve Reserve, KLR riders know all about it :deal
  5. Bob_M

    Bob_M Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    173
    Location:
    Tiverton, RI
    Maybe not a McGyver moment but I had to torque a crankshaft bolt on my Grand National to 310 lb-ft. with no way to keep the motor from turning.
    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    Didn’t want to risk stuffing rope into a cylinder to lock the motor. First tried to use a piece of 1” dia EMT pipe with the end notched and wedged between one harmonic balancer bolt and the floor.

    Lifted the car up off of both jack stands with torque wrench, cold sweat emerged when one of them shifted out of place, managed to kick it back in place and let car down since I was on a creeper under the car at the time.

    Waited for heart rate to drop below 100 then looked for some wire rope, ran it through a hole in the harmonic balancer and tied it to the frame, was able to torque the bolt no problem.<o:p></o:p>

    I’ve been home on vacation this week sick as a dog, but am now fully prepared to fix absolutely anything, since I have read every post in this great thread.

    Keep it going.
  6. svejkovat

    svejkovat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    856
    This morning my kitchen smelled like a toxic chemical dump. WTF? Really nasty rubber chemical burning dioxin yada yada.

    I followed it to the back of the fridge. The compressor was trying to start and not having any of it. I removed the starter relay and starter cap and diassembled. Plastic was burned inside right next to a thermistor chip about the size of a nickel. Thermistor chip was shattered (due to heat and age) and the chips and debris were causing its spring loaded holder arms to short. Thermistor is used as a primitive but generally reliable relay. Closed circuit when cold, open when hot. Starts the run capacitor/starter windings when energized, heats up to open circuit within a quarter of a sec, then blocks current to the starter windings. Thermistor was broken up into three large pieces and a bunch of dust. Realized I had to get a new starter relay at the very least to save a fridge full of food until the part could be had.

    Studied up on the web what was happening and a blog described the exact same predicament. A TRUE Macgyver hero on the board suggested his own fix that worked for him. It should have been obvious but I just wasn't thinking in Macgyver mode (no coffee yet). Just clean out the arc causing debris and reinsert the largest of the broken pieces of thermistor between the holder arms. A thermistor piece has pretty much the same resistance curve as the whole. Voila!!! It worked beautifully. I'll only run it while in the house so that I can keep an eye on it and unplug it while sleeping. It would probably run trouble free for another 5 years like this but until I can get the replacement relay or, more likely, replace this 10 year old Gibson, my food wont spoil!!!!
  7. svejkovat

    svejkovat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    856
    The mother of invention may be laziness, but also a good portion of determined thrift. The part at the local appliance store was 75 dollars and a few days' wait. Figured I'd just use my rigged one as is until I buy a new fridge.

    On a whim I stopped at the scrap yard on the drive back and looked at the dozen or so fridges on the lot. The relay is just a snap-in that's exposed in the back of the fridge.. 15 second removal tops. There were two of them with identical part numbers heading for the heap. I snapped them off and gave the attendant a buck for them.

    Snapped one in when I got home and all is golden. Good for another few years anyway.
  8. liquidsmile

    liquidsmile Long timer

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    Aug 13, 2007
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    1,361
    Location:
    Woodstock, Ga
    If you ever strip a screw you can use match sticks to put in the hole and put the screw back in until you can fix it properly. Used this just the other day on my boat on a carpet cleat that came out of the fiberglass.
  9. theothersean

    theothersean dirty boy

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,054
    Location:
    middle of nowhere (central mass)
    I stripped the head of the allen cap screw that holds the battery into the back of my garmin zumo 450. luckily I was still able to apply enough down pressure and catch enough of a bite on it to it to get it out , then wrapped the threads in electrical tape to protect them while I put it in the bench vise and used the edge of a thin small file to make one slit across , basically turning the stripped allen head cap screw into a flat head screw that i can now get in and out with a common flat head screw driver , or tip of a pocket knife.

    on a side note , the head was recessed in the plastic of the battery , but in other cases when you have stripped the head of a screw, bolt etc and if you can access the head you can use a dremmel, hack saw, or file to make a slit and use a flat head screwdriver to back out the fastener with the stripped head .
  10. arcanum

    arcanum Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2011
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    Location:
    Arcanum OH


    Heat shrink works well to keep shoe string ends from unraveling as well. That cheap crap little plastic OEM shoe string end protector just does not cut it.
  11. Wlfman

    Wlfman Long timer

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    Sep 6, 2011
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    Location:
    TN/AL
    Or better yet, don't have any keys except the bikes ignition key on the ring. This way you don't have to worry at all about scratches...
  12. AK Oldman

    AK Oldman WANDRN

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    253
    Location:
    Back home in Alaska!
    My oldest son borrowed my cruiser for a few months. He put the single key I handed him on a ring with a bunch of other keys. When he brought the bike back the triple tree was, IMNSHO, ruined. I'm not worried, I hid his body very well!
  13. davemon

    davemon High Speed Airhead

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    125
    Location:
    NC
    Got a flat tire on the new to me beemer and pulled out the plug kit to find the glue to be a block and the fancy BMW plugs rotted and falling apart when going thru the tire, rummaged through the tank bag and pockets and found a rubber band used for stowing lines on the deployment of most sport parachutes. Inserted it easily into the tire cut off the excess and after a couple of shots of CO2 and was back on the road home. Macgyver would have been proud. A nice ball of rubberband now resides in the tool pouch

    Blue Skies and Cool Rides
  14. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2003
    Oddometer:
    11,887
    Location:
    Long Beach, CA
    <BR>The rubber band tire plug is a neat trick, Davemon!

    <BR>
  15. Drtbkdav

    Drtbkdav Now Happy again!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2012
    Oddometer:
    57
    Location:
    Berlin Germany
    While at the first reset of a national enduro several years ago, Steve Hatch looked down at my bike and asked "where is your drain plug?" I looked down and realized that when I had put my ktm 300 motor back together before the race, I had not tightend down my drain plug. it was only finger tight. :huh

    No oil was coming out of the tranny cases at all so I had lost all of the oil. worse, the biggest bolt I had was a 10mm and the hole is a 12mm. I had not noticed any running problems so far but we were only about 12 miles into the race. I wrapped some electical tape around the 10mm bolt and stuffed it into the 12mm hole. That seemed to work.

    Now that I have the hole plugged, what do I fill it with? I had a tool belt and the original camelbak but niether contained any spare oil. That is not something you would normally carry during a race. I knew there would be a gas stop sooner or later and I could go back to my truck and fill it up with oil then but that does not solve the problem of riding 25 to 40 more miles with no oil in the tranny cases. I contemplated removing the oil from one of the front forks but that would destroy the action and no longer allow me to continue racing.

    The only other liquids were gas/oil mix from the tank, or the orange gatorade in the camelback. Since I did not have any idea where the first gas stop was, I did not want to use the gas, I poured the gatorade into the tranny. The plug held with no leaks and the motor fired up. (the tranny oil is separate on a two stroke). I gingerly put it into gear and rode off. I took it easy and did not change gears and did not use the clutch. I noticed no problems with the tranny. After 20 miles or so I came to a check with an alternate gas stop. One of the national guys gave me a bottle of tranny oil but no one had a spare drain plug. A factory KTM rider offered me one at the known gas stop so on I went. This time with fresh real oil in the tranny but a taped in oil plug. I pushed it hard and made up lots of time till the gas stop. I got the spare plug from the KTM van (thanks guys) and managed to finish 4th in my class.

    After the race, I tore down the motor and split the cases. I could find nothing wrong with any bearing, gear or clutch. I replaced the bearings anyway.

    Gatorade as tranny fluid? sure if you have nothing else.
  16. svejkovat

    svejkovat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    856
    ...more tips&tricks than Macgyver, but if you ever need to hold threads really really steady in a vise then cut a slot in a nut, thread it onto the bolt/rod/stud and then clamp it up to your heart's content.
    Prevents damage to the threads.
    It's also a handy way to remove a stubborn stud from a block or case without damage when using vise grips.
    [​IMG]
  17. Marco Moto

    Marco Moto Voyager

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    Nov 14, 2008
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    1,324
    Location:
    surrounded by the Great Lakes
    ^^ Good one, Thanks! ^^
  18. victor441

    victor441 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,072
    Location:
    Sonoma, Calif.
    long ago I did not have a compressor,changed a tubeless tire on my MC and could not get the bead to even begin to seat well enough to hold air using a manual floor pump....but had two floor pumps on hand, pulled the air chucks off and connected them with a hose, then connected one to the MC wheel and the other to a tire on my car....this flowed enough air to get the bead to begin seating on the MC wheel, pulled the chucks off and then was able to pump the MC and car tires up to rated pressure with the floor pump.

    [​IMG]
  19. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
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    10,666
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    You know they have ground penetrating Radar now. They will find him if they are looking. :rofl
  20. Hobbes950

    Hobbes950 Darth Kitten

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,092
    Location:
    Nevada City
    Not mine, but a good one.