Your favorite Macgyver moments\tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HaChayalBoded, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. LC Garage

    LC Garage On Any Sunday

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    Used a kitty litter lid for the front number plate on an old Yamaha IT175, painted it yellow to match the side plates, worked great. We named that bike "Cat Scratch Fever" :lol3
  2. jeepsandbikes

    jeepsandbikes loneadventurer

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    to protect a wire that gets bent a lot , use the spring out of a old pen . twist it over the wire and volia .
    this can be used for wires that rub , or cables for your phone /gps that get bent near the ends .


    i also had a valve cover bolt strip and work its way loose , DPO stripped the threads . It was spitting oil all over me and the side of my bike . i pulled over and had a look at what junk i had with me . I had a rubber bunji that a guy gave me on a trip east . I used a nut and bolt that i had to remove from my dash cut a piece of rubber and using my swiss tool reamer put a hole in the rubber . i stuck the bolt through the rubber and threaded on the nut . it was just tight enough to slide into the hole where the bolt was . i tightened it up , it expanded and plugged the hole . i rode it that way for a week till i could track down the proper size heli coil for the head .
  3. Offthechart

    Offthechart n00b

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    Seated a tubeless rear tyre with a spray can of deodorant, after I lubricated the beads with hand cream.
  4. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    :clapYou know that you can do something similar just sticking a piece of hardwood dowel in the hole, then predrill and use a sheet metal screw. Even a branch of the right size if you are in the bush.:DSurprisingly strong repairs can be achieved that way.Turned out permanent on the rattly old Tecumseh on my old snowblower. And so are expanding metal or even nylon anchors for concrete/wood/drywall.With all due care and attention not to crack the cases.:eek1

    Thanks for reminding me.....forgot that I was going to fill a hole with solder or lead and then screw a #12x 3/4 sheet metal screw or so in there with the torque wrench to see how much torque I could achieve before stripping.:wink:

    Already done something similar to adapt top post batteries on cars to side post. Drilled/tapped and threaded into the posts, removed the center bolt on the side post terminals and bolted them on the top posts. Never failed or stripped at....from my wrist, 25-30 ft/lbs. Even rode the R100GS for a few weeks with a top post car battery mounted that way on the rear rack.:D
  5. buickid

    buickid Lets ride!

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    I suppose silver solder could be used, with even stronger results! :clap
  6. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    Bonding them metals to aluminium can be a problem because of the aluminium oxides. Watch that....:D

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmjdXKyDEWY

    May be better....or not just using them cheap alu repair rods instead of solder. On my list for other purposes now why did I forget to buy them?Too far now.:huh

    The things you have to do sometimes when you are in the bush or live very close in my case.:D
  7. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Anatomically Correct

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    I'm not sure why, but I find this post slightly creepy, and compelling at the same time . . . . .

    But thanks!
  8. Tinker1980

    Tinker1980 Long timer

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    I must thank you all for a most interesting thread, I read it in it's entirety waiting for the laser to finish cutting at work today.

    I will share a couple I have had to try on my own.

    I used to drive a 1988 Mitsubishi Mighty Max. Those who are not familiar with those little trucks, they are more commonly labeled as a Dodge D50. They are not common trucks by a long shot. Mine had a 2.0 liter 8 valve 4G63 engine, which has the infuriating issue of bad fuel pump location. The mechanical fuel pump (Carbureted engine) is bolted to the side of the cylinder head. The intake manifold is also bolted to that cylinder head, same side as the fuel pump, leaving approximately no room to get the damned fuel pump out. Another bigger problem, was the fact that nobody had said fuel pump in stock, at least no auto parts stores had parts in stock - more on that later. One instance when the pump died, my roommate and I were far, far away from anything, having only the toolbox on the back of the truck, and it was either a 50 mile walk to civilization, or get creative and make the truck run. I had several feet of spare fuel line for reasons I cannot recall, and a few bungee cords, and a gallon gas can. I set the roommate to getting gas into the gas can (Older Japanese trucks have a drain plug in the gas tank) while I used the flashlight on my fancy Keyocera Rave cell phone to get the fuel line off the carb, and plug the ones from the fuel tank. (Why most cellphones have cameras, and not flashlights, is baffling to me. A flashlight is much more useful.) We fed a fuel line down into the gas can, attached the other end to the carb, and strapped the gas can to the roof of the truck - bent the back corner of the hood up a bit to get the hose in with the hood closed. We had to stop to fill the gas can a few times. After that, I put an electric fuel pump on the truck, and never had that problem again. I learned a bit later that to get engine parts for the truck, one didn't need to go to an auto parts store - you were better off going to a forklift shop. The Mitsu 4g63 engine is used in a few forklifts, such as the Clark GC25, a few Mitsubishi lifts, and smaller Caterpillar lifts.

    With the KLR I had an issue related to the fuel petcock - the vacuum operated one. Local motorcycle shop didn't have one that would fit. Took the factory petcock apart, just to see what was inside to see what I could do with it. Ended up going to the local Industrial Supply Shop and getting some fuel-proof rubber from them. Cut a piece and replaced the vacuum diaphragm with the rubber, and it's not been an issue since.

    Another favorite - the ignition coil started to give up the ghost on my Chevy truck. We would go about six miles, and the truck would shut down. 30 minutes later, it would run again like nothing was wrong. For a week I kept the coil in the freezer at home, put it in the truck to drive to work, and put it in the freezer at work.

    Reading the stories posted here has made me think - most people cannot do these things. The wherewithal to see a problem, and think of a solution that involves only the things in arm's reach, is not a normal ability. I grew up in a family where if something broke, we would fix it - no matter if it was a toilet, doorknob, car, computer, radio, VCR, etc etc. If it could not be fixed, we tried anyway - what is there to lose?
  9. luxlogs

    luxlogs Been here awhile

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    What you are reffering too is the difference between a Mechanic and a Glorified Parts Changer.
  10. Tinker1980

    Tinker1980 Long timer

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    A trick I almost forgot about, that is really handy for repairing small plastic things temporarily. (I've used it for the wife's eyeglasses)

    A tube of super glue, and a strip of an old T-shirt - cut a strip big enough to wrap it around the broken plastic part, and soak it though with super glue. The wrap it around said part. You end up with something similar to fiberglass when it dries.
  11. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Been here awhile

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    Used my girlfriends pantyhose to improvise a fan belt for my 62 Nash rambler American. On the plus side in not only got us home but got her partially undressed. (And the rambler was a station wagon where you could fold front seats back and rear seat back forward to have a perfectly flat surface front to back)
  12. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

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    Very interesting! I wonder if ripstop nylon would also work for that?


    <BR>
  13. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

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    &#8194;&#8194;:lol3&#8194;That's an improvement to the old running-out-of-gas trick.


    <BR>
  14. JTT

    JTT Long timer

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    Saw a neat trick the other day by a plumber. I had a leak in a 4" ABS drain pipe inside a wall (as a result of a "misdirected" recip :cry). Instead of cutting out the pipe, he took another piece of ABS and started sawing small strips off and collecting the shavings. Mixed the shavings with ABS glue on a board making a slurry (as the glue dissolves the ABS), then applied it like putty. Made me think of other applications using this technique.
  15. small_e_900

    small_e_900 Amanda carried it

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    Most motorcycle plastic is ABS.
    You can repair cracks in a similar manner, but if you take the shavings and put them in a jar of acetone over night, you'll have a paste that will have a longer working time than if you use ABS glue.
  16. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

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    Related to that, Christy's, Oatey, and Weld-On each make a black-colored, ABS-filled, medium-body, ABS cement. It sounds a lot like what you're talking about.

    <BR>
  17. mikesova

    mikesova Michigander

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    [​IMG]

    I recently acquired a Honda quad that was missing it's starter button. There was a square plastic pin still sticking out, though. I work with kids in an afterschool program and we were taking old keyboards apart a few weeks ago, to use the parts for upcycling into other items. I noticed the keyboard keys might work ok for the job. I hollowed out the inside portion of the key and it slid over the square pin just about perfectly. So, I used some Goop to glue the new button on. I waited 24 hours and boom, it works perfectly. :)
  18. duck

    duck Banned

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    I wire up an Audiovox CCS-100 cruise control to the K1100LT/R1100RT windscreen switch on my K bikes. Waterproof OEM switchgear w/o the need for an add-on control pad.

    [​IMG]
  19. arcanum

    arcanum Been here awhile

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    The cracked fuel [suction]draw line/check valve on my Bobcat 853 was just impossibly located to remove and re-install with a replacement. The replacement part fits into a 7/16 diameter hole and when installed,expands the rubber parts to fill the non-threaded hole in the tank.
    I tried for hours to figure out how to get the old part off and the new part on.The little beastie was located somewhere under the main hydro drive pump in a[ stand-on your head to get at things and no room for your hands or tools ] cluster fock engineering nightmare.

    The fuel tank is made from heavy poly like an ag spray tank. Suddenly it hit me... Drilled a new hole in the tank in an accessible location ,ran new fuel line/check valve to the engine, and plugged the old fuel line coming from the original location.

    Half hour job once the "right way to do it" was abandoned.
  20. taosgsr

    taosgsr Been here awhile

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