Zumo 660 - how sensitive is the screen to touch?

Discussion in 'Mapping & Navigation' started by rdwalker, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

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    Hi, all,

    I just got a Zumo 660 and am playing with it - for the first time, in front of my computer. Ahem... too late to go for a ride, no?

    Question: I find that the touchscreen display is surprisingly insensitive to finger pressure. I have to press it rather hard and hold my finger for a brief moment, in order to have the "click" register.

    This is in stark contrast to other Garmin devices I have: a few Nuvis, a StreetPilot 2820 and 2730, which are very easy to touch.

    For those of you who have had experience with older units and can compare: is the low sensitivity of my 660 normal? Did you also find that you have to press so much harder? Or, do I simply have a bum unit?

    TIA, Robert.
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  2. Mudcat

    Mudcat Unregistered

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    I have a Zumo 220 that requires a very light touch compared to my Zumo 450. I like that and it’s the only thing about the 220 which I do like.
    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p> </o:p>
    I think the screen on a 660 should work very easily.<o:p></o:p>
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  3. wonderings

    wonderings Long timer

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    I dont notice much of a difference compared to the 550. I always compared to my iPhone and iPad which really are sensitive, the Zumo feels like you need to push into the screen for it to work in comparison.
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  4. dddd

    dddd Been here awhile

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    100% normal, that is actually a feature of motorcycle gps, think about big coarse heated gloves and you will understand why. I think it is still too sensitive, I barely can point a place, it always ends up dragging the map a few 8th of inch instead.
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  5. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

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    Yes, I am not a novice with motorcyle GPS units and I understand that they need less sensitivity.
    Over the years, I've gone through the whole StreetPilot 26, 27 and 28 series and I currently have the 2820 and 2610 on my bikes. I also used a 550 on a rental, but unfortunately cannot recall its performance (though it must have not been unusual to me, as it did not raise any flags)..

    That is my point of reference, then: does anyone know if the 660 is much less sensitive than the StreetPilots?
    #5
  6. Mudcat

    Mudcat Unregistered

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    I don’t have any issues using my 220 with gloves on, well; I wouldn’t scroll the screen with gloves on. But I would not do that with my 450 either.
    I think you need to pose your question in the GPS forum here, Laying down Tracks.
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?s=&daysprune=&f=37<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
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  7. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool

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    I have a 665 that I use with no issues. I put a smartphone screen protector on it and have found that it works best with gloved fingers. Without gloves, I need to lightly touch the screen using my fingernail.

    No issuse with a fully-gloved dust wipe while riding that I was initially scared of.
    #7
  8. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

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    Thanks, guys. Time to put my gloves on and try the screen that way.
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  9. V-Tom

    V-Tom Been here awhile

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    Screen protectors can make the screen much less responsive to touch.

    ..Tom
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  10. lhendrik

    lhendrik Truffle Rustler

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    660 is less sensitive than 550. takes a firm press for me. works fine though.
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  11. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

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    Thanks again. Right now the 660 is riding in my truck, testing against the 2820. Hopefully on the bike by the weekend.
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  12. NJ Moto

    NJ Moto Long timer

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    Yep, my Zumo 550 needs a little more push than my old Street Pilot 2610.
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  13. BJ_CT

    BJ_CT Adventurer

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    I have two 665s. The sensitivity is slightly different in each but both work with gloves. It's just that one takes a little more concentrated effort.
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  14. Mudcat

    Mudcat Unregistered

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    I’d be very interested in seeing how you like the 660. The 220 I recently bought is very disappointing, it’s primarily routing that I am disappointed in. And while it does more then my 450, it doesn’t do anything as well, except the touch screen works easer. I do like that. :deal
    #14
  15. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

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    Well, I am on the fence for the time being. It's a great new shiny gadget, so how could I not love it? But, read on.

    I cannot compare the 660 with earlier Zumos. My main experience is with the whole family of StreetPilots. We actually own a Nuvi as well - with similar user interface to the Zumo - but it is my wife's receiver and I do not play with it much (she loves it). Still, you may find this useful.



    I spent last few days with both my SP2820 and the Zumo 660 mounted next to each other on the dashboard of my SUV. It's a duel of British-language Emilies!

    Which brings up a weird observation to start. Both units are set for British pronunciation, but American text. However, the Zumo Emily uses British expressions, like "take the slip road" - while the StreetPilot Emily tells me to "take the ramp". Interesting.

    First user experience, once I got over the "new & shiny" excitement, was lukewarm. Necessitated by lack of buttons, the Zumo interface requires more involved navigation between menus. The only real shortcut I found is the long press of the "Back" button, which takes you to the main screen. That is wrong; it should go back to Map since the user is more likely to have jumped out of Map screen when drilling down some adjustment menus.

    Also, some features seems to be missing. There is no "GPS Info" showing acquired satellites and exact time - contrary to description in Help. Map detail has less selection granularity: it offers only high-normal-low choices. High detail is too high; too many POI's clutter the map.



    The big performance test took place today.
    I was dropping my nephew off, for a flight out of JFK. The awful traffic mess this morning on George Washington Bridge and Cross-Bronx on one side, and on Staten Island Expressway on the other, resulted in me taking the "scenic route" through city streets of Jersey City, Manhattan and Brooklyn. 2-1/2 hours one way, 2 hours return. Luckily, I left very early to allow myself plenty of extra time in the morning, but it was getting uncomfortably close.

    Anyway, I digress - the point is that both receivers got a great workout today and I could compare their operation side by side, for a long time and in various environments.

    Zumo seems to have a better receiver - it subjectively had less instants of lost reception than the SP2820 and it recaptured signal slightly quicker coming out of tunnels.

    The big negative was in routing. Both units were set for Shortest Time routing (my standard mode of navigating; when riding just for fun, I use only the map screen). Over a combination of highways and busy streets here in the NYC metro area, several times, the Zumo calculated a route leading through city streets. My knowledge of the area suggested traveling on highways as much as possible - and that was also the selection made by the StreetPilot. Zumo's city route had an ETA about a minute sooner than the StreetPilot's highway route - out of about an hour remaining on the route. Apparently, Zumo's algorithm is too optimistic about the time spent in city traffic - as if assigning too short a time to traffic-light effects or using too high expected average speed.

    On my way back from the airport, no longer in a hurry, I actually let Zumo's Emily lead me into streets of Elizabeth and Union, NJ - instead of StreetPilot's Emily's (and mine) choice of the New Jersey Turnpike - just to see what happens. The result was a tremendous loss of time, about 50% of ETA, mostly due to stop lights since the traffic was light by then.

    I do understand that no routing algorithm is perfect and can be often trumped by local knowledge. What I found disappointing was that several times the StreetPilot made the "correct" selection, while the Zumo not. Both units are using similar vintage (2011) of City Navigator maps.

    That, of course, only matters if you use the receiver to navigate to a destination - and if you know the area enough to get a sense that you are being waylaid. If you only use it to roam about, just to look at the map to find where you are, it is likely that this quirk would not bother you.

    Not a glowing endorsement, huh?
    #15
  16. Mudcat

    Mudcat Unregistered

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    Robert, if I just tap the back button it will take me back to the previous page I was using. If I firmly press the back button down, then it will take me back to the main menu. But I can go one page at a time or several depending on how I press the Back button
    I like riding by shortest distance, I want back roads and my 450 is very good at giving me those with that setting. The 220 is not, it wants to route on main roads. I began thinking of the 220 as Long Way Around.
    I bought my Zumo 450 on a whim; I was really looking for a compass to put on my bike. No one could have convinced me I needed a GPS. But it greatly improved the quality of my rides.
    Good luck with your 660.
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  17. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer

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    That's what made me unhappy about the "back" button. Short taps take a screen back, that's fine - but long press goes to main menu. Since am riding in Map View, now I have to press one more button to get that. Presumably, no one rides with main menu on display. I am missing the instant returnability (?) to Map View with the Map button on StreetPilots or the Page button on Quest receivers.
    I know it is a minor quibble, but it shows me that some design choices were not made by riders.

    I do agree that GPS receivers improve riding experience. When I first started (with a GPS III, then GPS V, remember those?), it was really just a novelty farkle due to the small screen size and resolution.
    Today's crop of receivers greatly enhances my riding, bringing it up to a quite new level. It is a tool for a cross-country haul, for sure, but it really changed how I do my favorite roaming-about through backwater byways and neighborhoods. I ride with the receiver left in map mode and, quite often, become intrigued by the small turn-off just ready to scroll by - so insignificant that it would not be shown on the state-scale paper maps I have. The receiver just encourages me to turn in and check that road out. In combination with a paper map on the tank bag for a larger overview, it gives me a great geographical awareness.

    Works for me, in any case... ;-)

    Best regards, Robert.
    #17
  18. Mudcat

    Mudcat Unregistered

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    I use my GPS in a different manner. I rarely look at its map; I run routes continually in a direction I wish to travel. I have a destination in mind I may only whish to get close too and I use auto routing to get me there.
    My Zumo 450 is very good at this. It tends to route me the way I am traveling by the shortest distance to my destination.
    If I see an interesting road, I just pull onto it and the Zumo will give me a new route to my destination by the shortest distance without making a U-turn.
    I find this a lot of fun and makes exploring easy and fruitful.
    I once crossed western <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:smarttags" /><st1:State><st1:place>Oregon</st1:place></st1:State>, north to south, all on back roads, using 6 addresses to route too. It was a fun ride.
    I really do not have an issue with how the back button works. If I use it while I am riding I am only a page or two from my map. One or two taps will bring me back. But I rarely use the back button when I am riding; I am generally parked when I need it.
    #18