With the Consumer Electronics Show running in Las Vegas this week, tech-minded motorcycle companies are keen to launch new gadgetry, and in the case of Damon, new motorcycles.

The Damon Hypersport electric motorcycle has an interesting mix of features. Its performance is close to the highest-tier electric superbikes, but it also has a big emphasis on safety.

The Hypersport uses the Co-Pilot safety system, which is intended to provide a warning system with 360-degree coverage, using a combination of cameras, sensors, mobile technology, and onboard AI. If the Co-Pilot program detects an imminent crash, it alerts the rider through haptic or audio feedback.

Different OEMs are working on this technology, but if Canada-based Damon meets its production goals (a big if!), it may be the first manufacturer to actually bring it to market.

The Hypersport also uses Damon’s electronically-movable “Shift” controls, which can change the riding position from a more laid-back approach to a racing stance. Again, this sort of idea has been bandied about by other OEMs, but we still haven’t seen it come to market.

As for the bike’s specs: Damon is claiming the new machine will have a 200-mile range of combined city and highway riding (regenerative braking and slower speeds in the city make for an extended battery range, as opposed to just highway riding). It’s supposed to have a 200 mph top speed, and make 200 hp. Its electric motor is rated for 147.5 lb-ft of torque. None of the pressers we’ve seen have mentioned battery capacity, battery recharge time, or weight. However, Damon’s website suggests a 21.5 kWh battery, and show goers are saying the bike weighs 200 kg. That sounds extremely optimistic.

Damon is bringing the Hypersport to market with an MSRP of $24,995; for $39,995, you can get a Hypersport Premier with Brembo brakes, carbon-fibre swingarm, Ohlins suspension and other upgrades. The Premier is going to be manufactured in very limited capacity.

Damon says it plans to start delivering the Hypersport in 2021, and will sell directly to customers, drop-shipping the bikes with no dealership involved. So how will it get servicing? Or warranty work? We’ll see.

Featured image: Damon

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