Detailed drawings have emerged showing Harley-Davidson’s new “small” bike, the 338R.  According to Motorcycle.com, the images come from a filing with China’s National Intellectual Property Administration dated December 10, 2019.  The filing also reportedly shows only Harley-Davidson as the rights holder with Harley designers given credit.

While the images are only drawings, this time we get a better look at the upcoming bike from different angles.  Although the Harley machine uses a Qianjiang QJ350 platform, there are differences between the two models, at least from a styling perspective.  Overall, the Harley looks to be a more minimalist, slimmer, smoother, and less aggressive-looking machine.

338R Styling differences

Its flat track-ish inspired styling sees it using more “traditional” shapes with a round headlight, round instrument cluster, a smaller, more rounded looking fuel tank, and a lower, but stepped one-piece seat.  The seating position appears to be more neutral and less aggressive, while the footpegs are in a relatively traditional position.  Adding to that upright position are flatter handlebars that reach back further.  The 338R also uses a more traditional tail-mounted license plate bracket with integrated lighting.

We can also see other details about the bike such as its suspension and other important elements.  Both bikes appear to have similar suspension setups.  Up front is an inverted fork while an offset single shock is mounted alongside the machine’s frame.  While we don’t have any details about brake components, both bikes have triple discs.  Twin rotors are mounted at the front while a single rotor is at the rear.

As to whether the bike will be continued under Harley’s Rewire plan, Motorcycle.com reached out to Harley and was told that development on the bike was still continuing.  Harley also reiterated that the bike would be available for sale in China.

It will be interesting to see how the bike sells in China with a “premium” price tag.  And if those sales are good, whether Harley would bring the bike to Europe or other parts of the world.

 

All image credit:  CNIPA

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