“Fancy” rides the TAT – Post grad school decompression trip

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by trikepilot, May 19, 2016.

  1. Sliverpicker

    Sliverpicker Been here awhile

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    The "TAT Blaster"--------Just after sunrise in La Pine, Oregon 2 days before the completion . He still has the go power ! IMG_3650.JPG
  2. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile Supporter

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    Update....

    Made it easily to the bike dropoff in Tualatin and then Ubered to a PDX hotel. Spent the entire next day in airports and airplanes but made it back to NC. I took a recovery day in Asheville to visit with some of my grad school buddies and then packed up the car with my shit, the dog, and an empty trailer and ran back home to Roanoke where I am trying to dig out of a month's absence and get my life in order before jumping into work.

    The trip report will be closed as soon as I receive the GoPro that FedEx ground is currently bringing my way. Also once Federal delivers Fancy, I will update the logistics of and experience with shipping the bike across the country.
  3. ruppster

    ruppster Long timer

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    You sure are making it hard to go to work tomorrow... :)
  4. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile Supporter

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    Day 28 June 28 – Fruitland, ID to LaPine, OR (453mi)

    Fully rested from the zero day in Fruitland, I was eager to set off on the OR leg. The temps were calling for 102 degrees and I knew that there was little interesting to see in far eastern OR so I took off by 0530 in the AM in hopes of getting some serious miles in before the heat could build and then at that point, I would have some altitude on my side to cool things down a bit.

    Additionally, my goal was to really punch out a big day so that I would have more time to explore and savor the Cascades. I also had a plan to detour south a bit to see Crater Lake and then rejoin the TAT to the Paulina and East Lake area to poach some camping in the USFS. But then SilverPicker chimed into my thread with tales of gas generators, AC hum, and barking dogs at my intended campsites and counter-offered a place to crash in his backyard just down the hill from Paulina Lake in LaPine. So with my night’s goal set, I took off

    Sunrise over the Snake River and the rolling hills of east Oregon

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    Gorgeous light and long shadows

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    Some fun with my shadow and the GoPro





    They still really like their hay out here

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    I blasted the rolling grass and sage hills and finally started to see some trees. They were huge ponderosa pines.

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    At this point the TAT started to change character. At several points, a choice of roads would appear and the TAT would take you on the one that appeared lesser travelled or even abandoned. There were a few barbed wire “gates” that I had to get off, take down, ride thru, and then restring – but the track kept going. I kept faith in the purple line on my GPS and pushed on. The surface would get rough and truly qualify as dirtbike terrain but never was outrageous. Picking good lines and riding with some authority up on the pegs easily saw us through. But on more than one occasion, I had my doubts on the veracity of the route and I wondered if there was any chance I would get through.

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    There were times were the TAT was simply to tracks thru the wilderness – often times thru beds of flowers

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    More big trees – at least big by my standards at home in Appalachia

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    Then we started to get some elevation in the Strawberry Mtns and some great vistas



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    Came across this fire lookout but it was encircled by a locked fence and was very uninviting. I normally would try to stop at a place like this but not today.

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    The descent out of the mtns was down some very very remote feeling canyons where I really first felt as isolated and alone as I had in the ID border to Arco section. It felt like you could be out here for a VERY long time without seeing anyone if you broke down.

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    At one point, I came across a horse trailer curiously parked in the ditch partially in the road. Hmm… strange? And then within a mile, I came across the cattle drive. It was like I had stepped into a Hollywood movie set. The cowboys were up on their horses fully decked out in the cowboy “uniform” herding the cattle up the road with the help of several dogs. I slowed near the trailing cowboy and asked – “so… how best to get through?” He just drawled – “just ride on through them.” So I did and here is what it was like.




    But those isolated and seemingly abandoned sections were not the norm. The roads were generally good gravel otherwise and I was able to really make good time. The first part of this day one in OR was about 130-150 miles from Huntington to John Day so again I was really glad to have nearly six gallons of fuel onboard.




    Uh oh!!! Tree down!!!

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    This was my first tree blockage and would portend more drama to come. I stopped, took off the helmet and jacket, and started to contemplate my options. Can I break branches off to get “thru” the tree? What about riding around in the forest? As I scoped this option out, I had to walk around the tree to see my exit and that is when I saw another tree down that was equally big several hundred yards up the road. Preferring to be an ADV rider rather than an arborist, I decided to re-route. But how? There is a labyrinthine maze of gravel and dirt roads out there – how to choose?



    Luckily, I had bought Garmin’s 1:10k TOPO map on CD-ROM and uploaded to my laptop and then to my Montana. I sat down in the shade, cracked open a new bag of peanut M&Ms (my trail addiction!), and fired up basecamp. Within minutes, I had found a network of roads on the topo map that seemed to fairly efficiently reroute me. I quickly created the track, USB’ed it into my Montana, and took off. The route worked perfectly and I felt pretty smug. Little did I know that this would be an omen for the rest of the trip and that the topo maps would save my bacon numerous more times.

    And another barbed wire gate to traverse



    And then I hit Prineville for an early dinner and beer at the Ochoco Brewery before the final push on over to SilverPicker’s place.

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    The Crooked River canyon was a nice paved ride for 20 or so miles before it turned to wide open fast (saw 70mph) gravel roads.

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    The last section from Hwy 20 to the East/Paulina lakes area was a really weird leg. The locals – it appears – refer to the area as China Hat and much of it is an OHV park. Some roads were packed dirt with a 1-2” coating of white sand that was super fun. It was enough sand to keep things interesting but the Mitas e07 front always seemed to cut thru it to the hardpack below to limit any serious danger. It was fun to slide around but under control. I did have to be careful, though, as I had already about used up the e09 rear again and I needed to baby it thru to the shipping dropoff in Portland.



    Then other roads in China Hat were these narrow, rolling, swooping, and bermed ATV trails that were ridiculously fun to run at speed on a big fat bike like Fancy. I was up on the pegs and grinning ear to ear as I blasted these trails. But then the terrain would shift to these bigger roads covered in red pumice. And then change right back to narrow two-track heading up thru the woods. I can easily see that if I lived in the area, I could have a lot of fun playing on these trails.

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    I arrived at Paulina Lake and was wiped out. It had been a long day. But I rallied and blasted the almost 20 miles of pavement down to LaPine and rolled into SilverPickers for the night. He and his wife were great hosts. I got a much needed shower and then sat around talking bikes, ADV, life, and just general chit-chat. It is just these such encounters that make ADVrider such a great resource for the traveler. I only hope that I can pay this debt forward by doing the same as SilverPicker for riders coming thru my home area.

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    I was out like a light within seconds of laying down in the tent. A quiet nights sleep was had and my long day today meant that I only had 330 or so miles to Port Orford. I had been doing this kind of mileage regularly each day but now I had two days to slow down and enjoy the Cascades experience.
    ONandOFF, WVhillbilly and i4bikes like this.
  5. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile Supporter

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    Day 29 June 29 – LaPine, OR to Lake Miwaleta SP, OR (288mi)

    I was up early as per habit, but went back into the tent to allow the sun to hit the walls before I got out. I took my time breaking camp and packing the bike while chatting with SilverPicker. When I told him that I was gonna go try the Red Rooster restaurant I had seen on Yelp, he came along. After a good breakfast, we parted ways. Thanks SilverPicker!!!!

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    The next bit of the TAT was more sand than I had expected. And there was some interesting pumice/gravel that was a tad squirrelly. But by now I was fully used to letting Fancy float around a bit.

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    It was a weird mix of pumice and sand and ball bearings

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    More trees down. I rode thru, around, and over more of these than I can possibly recount, but eventually my luck ran out. Again… out came the topo maps on the Montana and around it I went.

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    And sometimes you just gotta get off and make some effort to clear the path and the ride around others...



    The paved detour to Crater Lake was a nice little diversion. I am glad I saw it and got 30 mins or so to sit and chill out in the cool weather and snowbanks. The lake defies description. The deep hyper saturated blue water on the lake sitting deep in the caldera of an old volcano where steep walls still held snow cannot be captured by my cell phone camera nor these words. You just gotta see it in person.



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    And a panoramic vid...



    I stopped by Diamond Lake to refuel as I had no idea of what kind of diversions I would need to make due to downed trees. Mathematically, I did not need gas if the TAT was clear, but I had learned my lesson… You will pay thru the nose for the gas there, but given my expectations, it was worth every penny. As you can see… I spent $8 for just under 2gals. Small bikes with little tanks might be well advised to swing thru here (only a short ways “off” the TAT) to maximize range.

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    Back on the trail… we got some altitude and some great views.

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    And then the track discrepancies started to pop up. All along… none of Sam’s tracks seemed to “autoroute” – ie: snap to or conform to roads. They were usually close enough that some zoom-in and zoom-out would help you decipher the way. But out here, things started to get more wonky as his points got maybe further apart and the roads had tighter curves. But with the Montana zoomed in to 500-1000 feet per cm scale (where I usually found myself riding) the purple line was sometimes as far as ¾ to an inch away from the road I needed as seen on screen. This led to some interesting dead ends.

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    But I adapted and soon began to get better at “divining” my way thru. Lotsa down trees still out there

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    I noticed that I was fatiguing faster and that my shoulders were cramped. I realized that I was just super stressed out that I was gonna have another tree down where it had not been cut and that it would occur beyond my reversible fuel window. I swore that if presented the opportunity, I was gonna buy a beer for whoever was doing the clearing work.

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    I just knew that the other shoe was waiting to drop. This was really isolated country and there were untold numbers of roads snaking all over the place. Who knew where they all went and my big fear was that when I finally hit the terminal blockage, I would be beyond the range of my tank to backtrack out to refuel and reassess.

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    And then I hit this sign smack dab on the purple track. I figured that “dead end” was aimed only at big vehicles and that the TAT would continue on. But it did not. I did not get a pic of the cul-de-sac terminus but there was a huge pile of dirt with a pit on the other side to block the road and the “road” on past this was heavily overgrown with no sign of any recent traffic. This is where I started to wonder if this was a new section of the TAT that was not previously used by those coming in from NV in the past. And since I was an early rider this season, the track had not been ground truthed yet. I want to compare tracks to confirm though.

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    Again… the 1:10k TOPO software saved my bacon. A few minutes on the laptop and I had a track to go after that took me over the ridge to the South and reconnected into the “dead-end” track later on. I took off worried now because I was at damn near 50% of my fuel range and 1 or 2 more dead ends or trees down would mean fuel starvation, an unplanned nights camp, and an InReach message for help.

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    But my alternate track worked flawlessly and all downed trees were easily dealt with. Soon I was back on the track. I rode thru some massive clearcuts

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    And some deep valleys with green rivers in them

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    This long (in hours not miles!) day led to camp just outside Glendale at the Lake Miwaleta state park. This day was LONG and tiring. Most of the way across the TAT, I had been doing more mileage and setting camp by 5pm. It was after 7pm when I pulled in. I was mentally and physically whipped. The campsite was grubby, unaesthetic, and expensive ($17) but the next bit of BLM/USFS land to stealth camp on was another 40+miles down the road. I was done!! So there I stayed. I figured I had about 130 miles to go to Port Orford the next day which should be “easy.”

    Ha!!! Fool....
    ONandOFF and one-track mind like this.
  6. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile Supporter

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    Day 30 June 30 – Lake Miwaleta SP, OR to Port Orford, OR (138mi)

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    Up early buzzing with excitement about the final TAT push. I had a persistent pain in my shoulder blades from carrying so much stress yesterday. But today, I was gonna have an easy day of 130’ish miles and ride victoriously into Paradise Point around late morning. Boy oh boy… I had no idea just how naïve I was. The TAT still had a few more hurdles in store for me.

    Compounding issues… I was 2100 or more miles into my e09 rear. It – like the same rear that went from WNC to western AR – was showing premature and catastrophic wear. I was concerned about getting to the shipper in Portland. I am still amazed at how well these tires do at home, but just how shitty they are on an 800+lb bike with loads of torque over long days in high heat on brutal terrain. Maybe they are just too soft? Maybe other knobbies would fare the same? I’ll never know. I do know that they perform awesome when they still have knobs but I need to have at least three of them to cross the US in decent shape. My current set was shedding rubber from the knobs as if I had tossed them into a chipper truck. And this was even happening with me consciously trying to “baby” them as much as possible.

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    I sure wish Heidenau would make an angrily aggressive knobby tire out of the same rubber compound that they use on their Scout. It would seriously suck on pavement, but might just be the perfect tire for the big bike doing the TAT. So, short story now made long… I was hyper-vigilant to baby this tire as much as possible. It HAD to get me thru….

    I stopped at the Cow Creek Store for fuel and breakfast at a local café that caters to loggers )aka 'merican sized portions!!)

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    And then it was off into the forest. I took Cow Creek rd to rejoin the TAT further up in order to minimize tire abuse. But was soon back up into the forest on the backroads.

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    I tried to relax. But as the road got seemingly less and less traveled, the sense of pending doom again settled in. C’mon… did I use all my Karma up on the first 29 days? Was I gonna get treed off or dead-ended on my very last day? I had booked a dropoff date for Fancy’s ride home so my trip was no longer open-ended. I am sure that I could have bumped it back if I got delayed, but it was a holiday weekend coming up and if I did not make the Friday dropoff, I was gonna have to kill three days out there and dropoff on Tuesday. That was not an enticing option. I wanted off the TAT. I loved the ride, but 30 days on the bike was enough.

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    The roads stayed nice in terms of surface but kept seeming to dwindle in size and recent use. I was just waiting for the next obstacle and it was that waiting that was the worst part. But there was little to do other than throttle on. For those that climb, the feeling was like being 20 feet out from your last piece of gear. You were stable and doing OK but downclimbing was a difficult if not impossible option and the only route was to keep going with all senses on red alert. The caloric consumption and stress ratio in this state of being is phenomenal and something I used to thrive on in my better days of climbing but I had not sampled this fare for some time. It was somewhat disconcerting but somewhere deep inside I felt a kernel of familiarity that allowed me to embrace the risk and use it to my advantage.

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    My mind wandered to all those years of high-standard climbing where I learned more about myself, my limitations, my motivations, and my capabilities than anywhere else. It was all paying dividends now as I stayed calm cool and collected knowing that these first world problems of my own creation were all easily assimilated and overcome.

    Climbing into danger and riding a 1200cc ADV bike into the wilderness alone started to merge for me. I reflected on some of the truisms that climbing taught me and now were coming to bear in the Cascades astride Fancy. I share two quotes from two of my friends/mentor/heroes from my climbing past. The first is from Jeff Achey and the second from Jeep Gaskin.

    The Crux

    "The challenge exists in non-numerical space. you pass the protection at the 5.12 "crux," and then the real ordeal begins. You climb there half knowing that that your mind might visit places you would not willingly go. It's dangerous, and myths and superstition do a better job defending it than common sense. The essence - the justification, if there is any - lies in obscure, ineffable moments."

    About Risk

    “49, 3 kids, all of whom climb. in fact we're going sunday. I'm going to die and so are you. so are my kids. in the perfect world i'll die before they do, but there aren't any guaranties. so i prepare them for life the best way i know how, doing the things that prepared me to massage my mother’s feet and tell her not to be scared, that it was her time to go. and that made it possible to kiss my dad one last time and tell him i loved him, and walk away. if you have depth to your soul and insights into life's lessons and you didn't get them from risk then congratulations but i can't relate. climbing can be deltoids or it can be zen; it can be runout or short safe falls; it can be skies filled with lightning or crisp air ahead of mare's tails. it is never standing in a grocery line.”


    But I digress…. It is just a state of mind that the last 130 miles of the TAT evoked and I thought I would share.


    Despite the stress, the TAT kept going on decent roads that varied in size and surface but never were an issue.

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    And then I saw my first sign… Holy shit!!! This is really gonna happen. There is a coast down there somewhere. The ephemeral goal is real. And it is within reach.

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    Ha!!! Fool!!! Get cocky will you??? How about some of this?

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    OK. Not bad. The TAT is a gift that keeps on giving. This time with a fullstop. A pee break. Some food, water, and I scoped out the potential to get around – zilch!!! That tree is 3-4ft in diameter and 100+ feet tall. Maybe a small bike could be stripped of luggage and dragged under the right side but not the big ol girl. Out came the topo map again, a re-route was plotted, and I took off looking for the ocean again.

    The re-route worked and soon I was up high with great views.

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    And then the first sighting of the blue line on the horizon. That there is the Pacific f&#$ing Ocean!! WooHoo!! I was in sight of my final goal.

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    Riding with renewed purpose - I continued on.



    This is a rock for those that might be confused. Uh... duh?!?

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    I kept dropping elevation and soon descended into the Elk River drainage that would see me to the coast. But I had to stop and checkout the ridiculous pools in the Elk River along the way. Where the hell were these gems when I was all hot and dusty. I’da dropped a nude bomb into that turquoise pool in a nanosecond were it not kind of chilly and the end of the road was only 15 miles away. Just simply stunningly gorgeous.

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    Fancy stopped to sniff the flowers along the way

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    And then it happened. In a surreal moment, the purple line on my Montana stopped and I simply ran out of road. There… 50 yards away was the Pacific Ocean. 30 days and 6100 miles after we started – Fancy and I were done.

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    We had crossed the continent on a dirtbike. Mission accomplished.

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    But the TAT was not through with me. The winds at Paradise Point where vicious-gusting to 30mph and tried to blow the bike and me and my gear all over the place. It got so bad that I had to re-park Fancy pointed into the wind so that she could stand without me holding her up. I took the obligatory photos and waited in vain for another soul to show up to get a shot of me and the bike, but after 20-30 of waiting in vain while being pummeled by the wind, I retreated off the very edge of the coast.


    I went to check out the town of Port Orford and Battle Rock but the vicious winds made it less than fun. A quick Google search revealed a brewpub up the road in Coos Bay so I took off. That 40-50 mile ride was the toughest pavement ride I have ever done. I was blown all over the place and the bridges over rivers and bays were downright terrifying. I was never so glad to have Fancy hefty mass below me. My little WRR and I would have been off the road several times.

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    The Seven Devils Brewery did not disappoint. Their IPA was just what I needed. Plus they had wifi so now that I knew I could make Portland, I was able to log on and book a flight back to NC without fear of missing the flight.

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    Another hour on the road north and I was at the home of one of my grad school instructors who had recently relocated out to Florence. I got a shower, a home cooked/grilled meal, and a great nights sleep in his snazzy Airstream. Thanks Dustin!!!

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    And that my friends.... is the end of the TAT. Tomorrow I'd head to Tualatin to drop off the bike and then the next day catch a one-way flight home and try to recover. I'll wrap up that part of the trip along with final thoughts soon.
    karter18, ONandOFF, jub jub and 9 others like this.
  7. one-track mind

    one-track mind Next time I send a damn fool, 
I go myself.

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    could be anywhere?
    Kudos!! Excellent report!!
  8. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    Not dead...good pilot.
  9. DanBarwick

    DanBarwick Adventurer

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    Independence, KS
    Incredible photos and video - this trip is just not fair to the rest of us. Great RR.
    i4bikes likes this.
  10. GAH@NRG

    GAH@NRG n00b

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    New River Gorge WV
    Wow! The trip report keeps getting better with the additional photos and videos. Great Ride, Great Report!
  11. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
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    GAH@NRG - your profile pic looks familiar! Glad to have you along for the ride to OR. Hope to see you soon!

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
  12. XTWalt

    XTWalt Been here awhile

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    Awesome last leg of the trip. Might you have been the first rider of the year on that part of the TAT?

    I love the way the Tenere sounds in your videos - what a beast.

    Walt
  13. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile Supporter

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    Hey Walt... your battery/charger is almost here. Fancy was in OH as of the 9th and they are saying anytime between Tues and Thurs she should be here in Roanoke. Then we can coordinate our Chaos Mtn trip.

    I am not sure about the ID/OR section of the TAT that Sam had modified. If you go strictly by the RollCall thread here at ADVrider, then I was most definitely one of the early riders on this section. But I am not sure about being the first. It is possible, tho. Kinda felt that way as the tracks seemed to need some more ground truthing here and there.

    The Tenere is a beast indeed. That motor is really sweet. It excels throughout the rpm range whether it be 75-100mph cruising, lugging along in technical terrain, or anywhere in between.
  14. mbogoscars

    mbogoscars Sleeper

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    AVL, NC, USA
    Your RR was awesome. Loved the parallels with climbing and pushing through. What a perfect trip.
  15. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
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    I have had some questions about the TAT that I will try to work into this summary.

    So the TAT for me was a total of just shy of 6100 miles over 30 days. I took 7 "zero days" so I rode for 23 days. My daily average was around 262 miles.

    Went thru three rear tires - two Mitas e09 and partially used Heidenau Scout - and likely could have done the entire TAT on one front on a Mitas e07 had it been on there at the start.

    I took alot of time to read reports here and PM TAT veterans to get a grip on logistics and packing. The most common theme was that "I overpacked." So I went to the other extreme and packed super light. I fit everything I needed into a Giant Loop Great Basin. The Yamaha topbox was mostly filled with foam and held my gopro kit, my laptop (SUPER helpful!!!), a portable harddrive, travel mug, slime pump, and all the cords and power chargers. It was essentially filled with my electronics rather than essentials.

    The big gamble if I made a gamble was taking the advice of the TAT vets that had shipped home all their cooking stuff around AR and just bought their food on the road. I went with absolutely no cooking equipment. But I made one concession to the fact that I am a coffee whore. I brought a bunch of the Starbucks Via instant coffee packets and I used an immersion heater.
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    This thing worked like a champ. I would get it started in my travel mug and by the time I had the tent down and packed up, I had hot water for the coffee. I never had any troubles with battery run-down but did, on occasion, let the bike idle while the water heated.

    I basically ate two "meals" a day and snacked the rest of the time. My tankbag held some clifbars, candy, jerky, nuts, and dried fruit - all enough to get me thru the day and adequate to replace a meal if I had to. But I was never forced to do so. If I was going to buy food to fix in camp, I would likely spend $6-8 at the grocery, carry extra water, assemble the stove, cook the food, clean it all up, and have to pack and carry it all. Or I could simply hunt up an interesting local dinner - brewpubs were my favorite target - and get a dinner for only a little bit more where I did nothing but enjoy it. I am sure that I spent a bit more than I could have had I gone super streamlined, but I felt that my method made for better food and added a bit to the trip as I got to interact with the locals a bit more.

    Other than the NC section (where we ran Kevin's track) I ran Sams track over the full TAT other than my UTBDR detour and other various minor detours. This was my TAT. Not Kevins or Sams or anyone elses. The tracks were all adequate and any issues with them only added to the adventure. My tracks did not autoroute to the roads so it did make for some interesting backcountry dilemmas. The road washout and the downed trees in ID and OR only added the the ADV ride experience.

    I rode the NC section with Mbogoscars. I ran the first 4 of the 5 CO passes with the the MotoGraphic team and Hirundo. And then I ran the 5th pass (Ophir) to Moab with Hirundo. Other than that I was all alone. I actually liked it that way. I did not like riding by committee. I started when I wanted to, stopped when I wanted to, and made detours or meal choices based on what I wanted. I also did not have to deal with dust as much as when you ride with others.

    I caught a raftload of shit from some folks about taking a 1200cc bike on the TAT. I would do it again without a moments hesitation. Yeah... there were some issues with the bigger bike but they were all problems that stemmed from my riding decisions and effort - not from the bike itself. Fancy just chewed up the vast majority of the TAT in good style, relatively high speed, and all-day comfort. I just needed to have three rear tires staged rather than two.

    What overnight stops would I recommend to others.... here they are in order as I remember them.

    Maxwell Millpond, NC
    Byrds Adventure Center, AR
    TAT Shak, AR
    Osage Hills SP, OK (detour required)
    LJ's Bunkhouse, OK (5 miles before the NM border - wish I had known this was here. AWESOME!! http://www.ljsbunkhouse.com/)
    Ravens Rest Hostel in Lake City, CO (http://www.theravensresthostel.com/)
    3 Step Hideaway, UT (go back and see my story about this place. DO NOT miss this!!!! - http://www.3stephideaway.com/)
    Neat Retreat RV park, ID

    plenty of rogue camping out west pretty much everywhere which is what I did most of the time

    So the UTBDR.... if you followed this thread, you know that I opted for the UTBDR rather than the TAT thru UT. I made this decision based on heat and the fact that I was solo on a big bike. Had I been in a crew of 3-4, the margin of safety would have been more acceptable. The UTBDR was fantastic. It was still mostly dirt and gravel and held some of the hardest riding found yet so far. Much of this riding was at 9k and deliciously cool. Two mornings I woke up to temps below 40 degrees. Sheesh... I went with the route to escape the heat but I got more than I expected.

    ID and OR were the real surprises. They were gorgeous states with amazing views and wonderful people.

    Many have asked about the logistics on getting home. Once I was on the ID/OR border, I went ahead and booked the bike drop-off for four days later. I did not book the flight as that would be non-refundable. I chose Federal Bike shipping based on the many many great reviews from here at ADV rider. I made it to the bike dropoff and Chad at Lile Transport made the dropoff super seamless. They had these custom made steel dollies that I loaded my bike onto. We strapped it down, I signed the papers, and called for my Uber. The total cost for shipping this big ass bike from Portland, OR to Roanoke, VA came to $710. I shipped two boxes of gear (boots, pants, jacket, helmet, tankbag, and more - total of 35lbs) for $92 via FedEx Ground. I got a one-way flight home that would have cost me $530 but I was able to use credit card points to get it for free. So the total cost to me to get myself, my bike, and all my stuff home was about $1300.

    Guess that about does it. The trip was everything that I wanted. If anyone has any questions regarding planning or logistics or anything else - just PM me. I'll be glad to help in an effort to pay forward the debts that I got from the help of so many others here at ADVrider.
  16. NOTAGAIN

    NOTAGAIN Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2014
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Eastern WA
    Well Done!!
  17. wbsims

    wbsims Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2014
    Oddometer:
    83
    Location:
    God's country, West Georgia
    Awesomeness, realky enjoyed the trip. Looking forward to the next and one day my own epic ride.

    Sent from my GT-P3113 using Tapatalk
  18. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,194
    Location:
    CT exile now in NH
    Great ride, great report, now get to work! :lol3
  19. NeilW

    NeilW 2-up Adventure Touring

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    169
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    Great synopsis . The whole report was on point. Your dining program has me rethinking my fully loaded, fully self-contained approach, especially when 2-up camping.
    Some of us never doubted the Super Tenere, or you.

    Thanks again for sharing.
  20. trikepilot

    trikepilot Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    725
    Location:
    Roanoke, VA & NRG, WV
    Ha!!! They pushed my start date back again due to delays with the credentialing committee so as soon as Fancy gets here - sometime today thru Thurs - I am headed to WV with the WRR for a week of riding. It will be interesting to see just what the massive flooding did to our ADV riding areas.

    The dining program was brilliant and you can thank Scheffy and his TAT trip report for pushing me to do it. It saves a ton of space on the bike. Time savings are also realized and you actually eat a little better, I think. But the biggest value was the interaction with the locals. I had some of my best times hanging with locals at the diner or brewpub and they, in turn, often were able to point out unique things to see or do in the area. I recommend it highly!!

    I also cannot stress enough that less is more. I took this pretty seriously and went super light. It makes for a better ride. Anything that you desperately need and did not bring can be sourced on the road anyway so why not give it a try?