'01 R1150GS Winter Refresh

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by guywithchickens, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    640
    Location:
    Central CT
    Winter is here in CT. Not great riding weather and ski season is starting, so it's time to plan out my winter tinkering.

    Backstory: I bought this 2001 R1150GS this summer from another inmate. Put about 3000 miles on it with no problems. Currently has a bit over 32K miles. I'm thrilled with it and would like to keep it for a long time, so she'll get some special attention this winter.

    Below: North of Rangeley, Maine close to the Canadian border
    IMG_0234.jpg
    Current status: On the workbench in the basement (with heat and good light!). Ready for surgery.
    IMG_0291.jpg
    #1
  2. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    640
    Location:
    Central CT
    I'm trying to put together a good work plan. I've developed a list of "must do" and "very likely do" items. They're all pretty straightforward. Where I need help is the "maybe do" list at the bottom. I have no problem digging deep into the bike if it makes sense. Also, I like to tinker and I have a few months, so I'm not opposed to some elective heavy maintenance. Which of the "maybe do" items should I perform? Am I missing any?

    Must do (mostly from maintenance manual):
    Change Oil
    Change transmission fluid
    Change FD fluid
    Change Fuel filter
    Change air filter
    Check brake system
    Check F/R brake pads & rotors
    Change brake fluid
    Change clutch fluid
    Check rear wheel studs
    Check rear wheel bearing play
    Check swingarm bearings
    Check side stand switch
    Grease side stand pivot
    Replace or adjust alternator belt
    Change spark plugs
    Retorque cylinder heads
    Check valve clearance
    Check throttle cables
    Check bowden cable
    Sync TB's
    Check clutch & gear shift

    Very likely do:
    rebuild clutch slave
    rebuild brakes
    Add SS clutch lines
    Redo headlight wiring
    Polish headers
    Add driving lights
    Add fuel line quick disconnects
    Clean/lube shifter
    Shim front of seat
    fix speedo noise (drive w/2.875? P/N 62122306532?)
    Wrap wires
    Throttle sync
    Compression check
    Check drive shaft rubbers
    Check wheel trueness

    Maybe do?:
    pivot bearings
    wheel bearings
    fork rebuild/oil
    spline lube
    AF-XIED (richen mix)
    new grips?
    paralever pivot bushings (http://nushings.com)
    Clean/lube starter
    New Throttle Cable
    Check timing
    clutch slave weep hole
    transmission input seal
    crank seal?
    shock rebuilds?
    add moly to trans/FD fluid?
    alternator belt?
    New pegs?
    Powder coat headers?
    Replace FD bearings?
    #2
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  3. lewisjr1

    lewisjr1 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    DC metro
    Ensure the flexible brake lines are reinforced with braided metal, rather than the OE rubber.

    Change all of the fluids. Drop in new spark plugs if you must.

    Consider the age and condition of the tires. If they're acceptable, over-inflate them by 5-10 psi, so that you can then ignore them until spring.

    Ensure the battery is fully charged, and then simply disconnect the neg.(-) cable. You're done.

    Come spring: reconnect the battery, check tires' pressure, key ON, press start, and ride away.
    #3
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  4. Norsman

    Norsman ...a GSophile

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    Consider replacing spark plug wires/coils if old. I have the dual spark, but if I remember right the main spark on one side went out around 30,000 miles.
    #4
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  5. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile

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    Nov 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    640
    Location:
    Central CT
    Thanks. All fluids were changed this summer and I put in new plugs. Tires are new. Battery is new and on a tender. Filters are new (air, oil, fuel). All brake lines were changed to SS.
    #5
  6. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Souped-Up Weasel

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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    Holy crap, man. Stop. Change the oil. Check / adjust the valves. Synch the throttle bodies. Put it to bed.
    #6
  7. Wilks

    Wilks Been here awhile

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    Nov 18, 2018
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    Location:
    Waterloo, Illinois
    Just built one of those tables for my garage.....secondly if you're really interested in doing the AF-XIED I've got one (along with some ev-14 injectors) I'd sell ya...bought for mine before I got it and it runs so good to me don't think I'll use em.

    Attached Files:

    #7
  8. TomLewis4412

    TomLewis4412 Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    59
    Location:
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    Thats some list! Dont think the shocks are rebuild-able...maybe find some used (rebuildable) Wilbers. Has the timing chain mod been done yet?
    #8
  9. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Add brake lines, flush the clutch fluid and I agree.
    #9
  10. rk1450

    rk1450 Seasoned Rider

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    Aug 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    93
    Location:
    Poughkeepsie N.Y.
    Nice job on that table, what lumber /dimensions did you use. Looks great.
    #10
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  11. roadrage

    roadrage Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,250
    Location:
    San Joe's A, Ca
    Just my opinion....

    Must do (mostly from maintenance manual):
    Change Oil - ok
    Change transmission fluid -ok
    Change FD fluid -ok
    Change Fuel filter -ok
    Change air filter maybe
    Check brake system - SS brake lines!
    Check F/R brake pads & rotors - ok
    Change brake fluid - replace with ss lines
    Change clutch fluid - no
    Check rear wheel studs - ok
    Check rear wheel bearing play -ok
    Check swingarm bearings - no
    Check side stand switch - why?
    Grease side stand pivot - ok
    Replace or adjust alternator belt, meh...
    Change spark plugs - maybe 50k is nbfd
    Retorque cylinder heads - fuck that
    Check valve clearance - ok
    Check throttle cables - meh
    Check bowden cable - meh
    Sync TB's -ok
    Check clutch & gear shift - didn't you do this when you last rode..

    Very likely do:
    rebuild clutch slave - Fuck that
    rebuild brakes - meh
    Add SS clutch lines - no
    Redo headlight wiring - meh
    Polish headers - fuck no
    Add driving lights - ok
    Add fuel line quick disconnects - you don't have them?? But yes
    Clean/lube shifter - ok
    Shim front of seat - overrated...
    fix speedo noise (drive w/2.875? P/N 62122306532?) - ok dunno
    Wrap wires - yeah, but be fucking careful as these wires don't like fucking with...
    Throttle sync - goes with the sync
    Compression check - meh
    Check drive shaft rubbers - meh
    Check wheel trueness - meh

    Maybe do?:
    pivot bearings - didn't we already do this?
    wheel bearings - meh
    fork rebuild/oil - meh
    spline lube - which?
    AF-XIED (richen mix) - This works good, but if you don't have surging not a big deal
    new grips? - wore out?
    paralever pivot bushings (http://nushings.com) - see, didn't we already check this? OEM is pretty good
    Clean/lube starter - can't hurt
    New Throttle Cable - why?
    Check timing - why?
    clutch slave weep hole - meh
    transmission input seal - worthy check (the seal behind the clutch slave)
    crank seal? - No not unless it's leaking (sleeping dog)
    shock rebuilds? - oem not an option
    add moly to trans/FD fluid? - meh
    alternator belt? - meh
    New pegs? - meh
    Powder coat headers? - why?
    Replace FD bearings? - sleeping dog, if fine leave it!
    #11
  12. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile

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    Location:
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    It's 3/4 ply, 4x4's, and 2x6's. If I recall correctly, it's 2' high, 2' wide, and 8' long (easy dimensions with 4x8 ply). I have big bolts on the feet to level it since my floor is very uneven. I use a 2x12 with a 2x4 stiffener as a ramp (but it's a two person job, not easy!).

    It makes it really comfortable and easy to work. Heat, light, and not bending over makes for pleasant work!
    #12
  13. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    640
    Location:
    Central CT
    Good input so far, thanks. I suppose this list looks too long. Bear in mind, I have time, a comfortable shop, and I like a good project. None of this is preventing me from riding (I have a V-Strom in the garage that I can ride on any nice days. Other days are for skiing!).

    There are a few things I need to fix: speedo squeals at front wheel, my LED headlight wiring job isn't great. And I'll do maintenance listed in the manual.

    There are things I want to do: driving lights, fuel line quick disconnects, polish headers (a little vain, I know), rebuild brakes (peace of mind), replace rusty bolts, clean everything, replace crumbling wire wrap

    There are things I'm worried about: clutch slave, dust/grime at engine/transmission interface (leak?), spline condition
    #13
  14. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Souped-Up Weasel

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    Dec 24, 2001
    Oddometer:
    30,615
    Location:
    Jax, FL
    Some clutch slaves last 30K miles, some last 100K. You'd hate to replace a 100K slave with a 30K slave. Buy one and keep it as a spare.

    Post up a pic of the dirty area. Lots of bikes have that. If it's not REALLY damp, it's not a problem.

    Check the splines through the starter hole. Half-hour project, and a good idea.
    #14
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  15. Wandergives

    Wandergives Been here awhile

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    Dec 22, 2015
    Oddometer:
    232
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    NY
    Removing the starter will give you an idea of most of these potential issues. I very nearly bought this exact bike and it is a great bike! Every 1150 I looked at appeared to have that grime or a weep at the interface. Good luck.
    #15
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  16. Wilks

    Wilks Been here awhile

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    Nov 18, 2018
    Oddometer:
    101
    Location:
    Waterloo, Illinois
    The table is 8' x 3'.....24"'s high.....I used 6x6's for the legs (had em left over from a deck addition you could use 4x4's)....2 x8's for the rest of it...crossbraced every 2'.....the ramp is made from 2x8x8's and I'm waiting on aluminum ramp ends right now....it's just screwed into the end right now.
    #16
  17. burbansk

    burbansk Exit 202 Mio Mad Man

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    414
    Location:
    Southeastern Michigan
    I have a 2000 GS and have been slowly doing the same thing you are. Make sure that you do the LH Cam Chain Tensioner update plus get a waterproof HALL Effect Sensor from one of our ADV Inmates who are rebuilding them. I spent a lot of time polishing my rims and exhaust, they turned out great! Maybe to think about getting some 1200 fuel injectors also. They made a big difference on mine. I commend you for the work you are doing, it gives peace of mind when you are a 1,000 miles from home out in the middle of no where. 2000 BMW 1150 GS RH.jpg
    #17
  18. PaulBarton

    PaulBarton Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    805
    Location:
    Seattle
    Lots of good insights in this list. I have an 01 1150GS with 109K miles on it. I am very fond of this bike and keep beating my son back when he suggests I replace with a newer 1200GS.

    As I see it, there are 3 main buckets of "work" to do on your bike: 1) Maintenance 2) Performance 3) Farkle/Accessorize. It's important to conceptualize which work goes in which bucket especially during a cold winter layover. You will quickly get scope creep and end up with a shaggy dog on that basement floor. It happens bu...

    1) Maintenance - this is the list you mostly got from the manual. This is the basic stuff done on regular intervals - fluid changes, seals (longer intervals), brakes, etc. Generally, monitor this stuff and change/maintain at recommended intervals. It is a delicate balance between "Don't create a current problem by trying to solve a future one" and "while I'm in there..." I say this because it appears that the OP is intending to "tear down" a well-running GS just because it's cold outside, he has another bike to ride and he wants to get to know this bike. That is a recipe for "disaster". Tearing down a well-running bike to get to know it is a misnomer. You get to know the bike by riding it and let it provide feedback to you as it's parts wear. If you proactively replace a clutch pack because you "were in there" after riding it for 3K miles you don't really have a point of comparison for what the clutch feels like over time. You gain the experience of replacing the clutch but you miss the wisdom of knowing when to actually change it. You also end up with a tendency for early replacement of parts. You may have peace of mind that you have new parts but when your a 1000 miles from anywhere and something falters your experience is a much smaller sphere for comparison.

    2) Performance - these are the things that you have determined either from experience or the insights of resources like this forum that you should or want to do to the bike. There are several items on this list that seem to be a relative consensus (LH CCT, SS Brake Lines, HES updated wiring, etc) and others that are personal preference. Some of these may have already been done to your bike and you just need to verify. The updated LH CCT uses a 15mm allen head bolt while the original uses a 17mm. That can be verified and checked off the list. SS Brake lines can be visually confirmed (You have already confirmed this). HES can be visually confirmed by removing front plastic alternator cover and looking. If old style then you should send to GSAddict for upgrading while you've got it out for the winter. Performance upgrades are great "while you're in there" type of mods for the most part. You are intending to upgrade a certain component either when it's time to replace an OEM one or simply because you're tired of a certain performance characteristic (i.e. pinging or surging). I would caution against using a performance upgrade as an excuse to proactively perform maintenance. One is "regularly scheduled" and one is "optional". Don't let the optional one alter the regular interval without reason.

    3) Farkle/Accessorize - this is another way to make the bike yours. This is a broad category but I would separate the actual performance upgrades from the Accessories. For instance, I would consider the 1200 Fuel Injector upgrade to be a performance upgrade and not a farkle/accessory. Some may disagree with this. I would include all protection, panniers, storage, windscreens, etc to be farkles/accessories. These should never dictate the maintenance schedule and depending on the nature of installation could be great winter projects.

    The big rub with doing any of this in the winter with the bike out of commission is you don't get to test the additions.

    So, I would have a tendency to pare that long list way down. I really like the advice that Jim Moore and JVB gave: 1) Change fluids, 2) check/adjust valves, 3)sync throttle bodies, 4) flush brake lines, 5) flush clutch fluid. That's it for maintenance.

    The other things on your shortened list:
    1) speedo squeal - excellent time to address this,
    2) LED headlight wiring - excellent time to address this too. So next spring you no longer have to explain the shoddy work to your riding buddies;-),
    3) Driving lights - another great winter project (Farkle/Accessory)
    4) Fuel Line quick disconnects - This doesn't have them?? I would definitely do this and use metal (not plastic) ones. There are some threads on this forum recommending certain ones. Make sure you reverse the couplers so there is no crossing the lines when you reconnect
    5) Re-sheath wiring harnesses - Another great project. If you plan on doing the sheathing (versus split wrap) I would encourage getting the pin tool from GS Addict. It works a treat and makes the job super smooth. I also like the look of the split wrap that JVB did and you won't need to disconnect the wire from the terminal. I would consider this requisite maintenance for a poor oem decision. There are threads on here that can give you the different options.
    6) Rebuild brakes - this is a little bit of creating a current problem to prevent a future one but they're brakes and you should be confident in them. I assume you mean that you are rebuilding the calipers and replacing the pads. You didn't indicate there was any issue with their performance in the 3k miles nor did you indicate the pad wear. Again, you should be confident in the brakes. If rebuilding them this winter provides that to you. More power to you.
    7) Replace rusty bolts - hmmm. I get the OCD thing but this really stinks of creating a problem now to avoid a perceived future problem. First off, you live in Connecticut, right? Snow in the winter, salt on the roads, etc. They are gonna rust again pretty soon. Some of the bolts can be replaced with SS but SS has a tendency to gall. The more you thread/unthread these bolts the more you increase the likelihood of stripping the female threads - especially where corrosion is present. This is not a true maintenance issue and not a performance upgrade. Don't use "while I'm in there" as your reason to perform this work.
    8) polish headers and clean everything - of course!! this is how you really tell the bike that you love it (besides riding it).
    9) clutch slave - Jim Moore said it best - "You'd hate to replace a 100k slave with a 30k slave. Buy one and keep it as a spare." No more needs to be said.
    10) dust/grime at engine/transmission interface - once you complete #8 above this won't bother you again until next winter. You can check the splines through the starter hole to help your peace of mind and then clean it again next winter if it isn't actually wet.

    Even your shortened list is 10 items long. Most aren't that involved. I think you mentioned cleaning/lubing the starter. Your bike only has 32k miles. Usually, you would start to hear a whine from the starter when this was becoming an issue. That is usually your cue to clean/lube the starter.
    #18
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  19. rk1450

    rk1450 Seasoned Rider

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    93
    Location:
    Poughkeepsie N.Y.
    Thank you for info. Did you use lag bolts or just nail and screw together?
    #19
  20. Wandergives

    Wandergives Been here awhile

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    Dec 22, 2015
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    232
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    How did you polish your wheels? I don't know what the PO did on my bike to them, but they look like hell. Perfect mechanical shape, but looks like they were cleaned with something bad at some point. Autosol had no effect.
    #20