1 year, 2 KLRs, and a whole lot of open road...

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by job3-14, Oct 14, 2009.

  1. tmills

    tmills Been here awhile

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    Truro, NS
    My son is drooling now. I'll have to cook him up some fish and brewis now. Looks like a good scoff.:freaky
  2. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    September 7th-8th, 2010 pt.1

    There were a few things that needed to be taken care of this morning before making our way towards Channel-Port aux Basques. 1. Bike needs an oil change. 2. Make a reservation for the ferry to Nova Scotia at Port aux Basques. 3. Stock up on food at Wal-Mart so that we don’t succumb to the overly priced food while on the ferry. We tackled the food errand first because we could hit two birds with one stone by picking up breakfast there at the same time. While at Wal-Mart, we happen to bump into ADV inmate kojack by chance. He’s been following our thread since the very beginning. When we made our way to Canadian Tire to change the oil, I noticed the GPS had stopped picking up the signal. I really do hope this is a temporary glitch and not permanent; otherwise we have to resort to the old school method of using maps. We were back on the road after running all our errands.

    We stopped at KFC back in Deer Lake to take advantage of “Toonie Tuesdays”. For $2 you get 2 pieces of Kentucky Fried goodness and a side order of fries. We also ran into another ADV inmate (forgot his moniker) who had just come from the Skibum Soiree and is now on his way to tackle the Trans-Labrador Highway.
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    Shortly after riding through the town of Corner Brook, it started to rain heavily. We endured as much as we could and toughed it out by riding through it. Luckily Amanda was running low on fuel and needed to stop at the next service station; we needed a break anyway. Upon arriving, we find out that there’s a power outage in the area including Port aux Basques. All gas stations in the area are out of order. The distance to Port aux Basques is too far even if I siphon gas from my bike. We’re stranded. Thank goodness we made the reservation for us to board the ferry tomorrow morning and not for this afternoon. The game plan was to get to Port aux Basques and camp the night to avoid having to rush to catch the ferry. We waited in the restaurant along with other stranded travelers in need of fuel. Power was back on about 3 hours later and by then it was starting to get dark outside. We topped off on fuel and decided to camp where we were next to the gas station. The rain eased up which gave us an opportunity to set up camp and not get wet. Just as we were picking an ideal spot, we met a Harley rider named Ian who pulled in to get gas. We get to talking and the next thing we know; we’re following him back to his place in St. George’s to spend the night. You see, not all Harley riders are meanies.
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    This morning called for an early start in order to catch the ferry. Last night we loaded the bikes into Ian’s trailer because it had started to rain again as soon as we arrived to his place.
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    Ian used to serve in the Canadian Navy
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    Ian escorted us back on the highway before waving goodbye
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    En route to Port aux Basques
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    We made it in time! Waiting to board the ferry.
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    Straps were provided
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    It’ll take a hurricane to knock these bikes over
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    486 km
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    String of chance meetings.

    GPS, say it ain’t so!

    Leather clad savior.
  3. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    September 7th-8th, 2010 pt.2

    The travel time on the ferry from Port aux Basques to North Sydney, Nova Scotia will take approximately 6 hours; plenty of time to rest, explore and update the ride report. My only concern is how choppy the waters are going to be; it’ll either be a pleasurable experience or a complete barf-o-rama extravaganza. We’ll soon see.

    Aboard the MV Caribou; a gulfspan class icebreaking ropax ferry
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    Entering service in 1986, the MV Caribou can carry 1,200 passengers, 370 automobiles or 77 tractor trailers, and 106 crewmembers
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    Off we go! I better enjoy the scenery while the waters are calm within the harbor.
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    Weather looks promising; we might be alright after all
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    A lighthouse to guide the way
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    One last glimpse of Port aux Basques. So long Newfoundland! Thanks for the memories!
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    We enjoyed the complimentary entertainment that was provided. We watched the movie The Bucket List and the latest James Bond installment Quantum of Solace.
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    A little caramel pudding to liven things up
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    Live music was played at the Killick Lounge
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    Trying on the latest fashion at the souvenir shop
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    Checking to see if the GPS works…looks like we’re using maps from here on in
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    Uh oh, weather not looking so good…
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    …but thank goodness the waters were calm. It was a pleasurable experience after all.
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    Cross the Cabot Strait.​

    Ninety-six nautical miles.​

    Caribou sets sail.​
  4. jbo99

    jbo99 n00b

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
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    Awesome ride report, read from beginning to end. Hopefully can do something cool like that some day.
  5. westerlywinds

    westerlywinds Two Wheels-Ride it

    Joined:
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    El Paso?
    Well I really enjoy the updates then I worry that they will end.I cant imagine you two not on yhe road..
  6. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    Make it happen! You can do it! Thanks for tuning in!

    Sorry Wes, unfortunately the end is near...:cry


    September 9th, 2010

    Yesterday we arrived in North Sydney in the early evening. It started spitting rain just as we docked at the port. With no GPS to guide us, we felt as if we were riding with blind folds on. That’s the pitfall with technology; we rely on it way too much and when it breaks down, all hell breaks loose. Gonna take me awhile to get used to reading maps again. We rode around the outskirts of town in search of a suitable place to camp. We were actually looking for gazebos to get us out of the rain. Having no luck on the outskirts, we rode back into town to figure out our options. We ran into ADV inmate porterrad and his friend Chris waiting to board the ferry to Newfoundland; both of them set on tackling the Trans-Labrador Highway also. We gave them a few tips on what to expect regarding road conditions on the TLH and wished them a safe journey.
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    We continued our search for gazebos and found something even better; an outdoor stage in a park. The only tricky part is that it’s highly visible to onlookers; we need to hang tight for a bit and use the cloak of night. In the meantime, we picked up supper at the local Canadian Superstore. We returned to the park a few hours later and scoped out the area. The stage was wheelchair accessible, which made it easy for us to roll the bikes in under cover as well; thank goodness for inclusiveness. We set up camp and stayed dry for the evening.

    The next morning we weren’t so lucky. It was pouring rain. Sure enough if we had a time schedule to adhere to we would press on. The smart thing to do is to wait it out, which we did. We found out later the two riders going to Newfoundland were stuck on the ferry for 28 hours before docking in Port aux Basques due to weather conditions.
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    The great thing about hard rain is that it usually doesn’t last long. It wasn’t long before we were back on the road again en route to the Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island.
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    The Cabot Trail is named after John Cabot who landed in Atlantic Canada in 1497. The scenic highway is a popular tourist attraction.
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    We stopped at this parkette for a potty break late afternoon and decided to call it a day
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    The only time you’re breaking the law is when you’re caught.
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    Hidden and away from the road
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    74 km
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    <EMBED height=300 type=application/x-shockwave-flash width=400 src=http://www.facebook.com/v/10150275450693477 allowfullscreen="true"></EMBED>

    A storm is brewing.

    On stage: Hobos on Two Wheels!

    Cabot Trail awaits.
  7. enormiss

    enormiss Been here awhile

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    Oh No, This cant end!
  8. azshtr

    azshtr Long timer

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    I am inspired at how you find camping under the radar... go you two
  9. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    September 10th, 2010

    The Cabot Trail has a reputation of having foggy conditions during the spring and summer months; probably has something to do with how the air flows up and around the highlands of Cape Breton. We weren&#8217;t surprised to run into a few patches of fog here and there.
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    We crossed paths with a few riders at a scenic photo stop having lunch. One of them happens to be ADV inmate Archimedes and his wife Deya who are 3 months into a 2 year trip to South America. Their ride report can be found here http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=628000
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    I figure Nova Scotia got its name by how the coast and highlands resemble those of Scotland&#8217;s; hence the name New Scotland.
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    We stopped at the local grocery store in Neil&#8217;s Harbour to pick up lunch&#8230;
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    &#8230;and had a picnic overlooking the spectacular view.
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    Looks like the fog has lifted&#8230;
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    &#8230;spoke too soon.
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    It&#8217;s hard to keep your eyes on the road when you&#8217;re surrounded by such beauty. The occasional section of twisties kept our eyes from wandering too much.
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    We met up with Archimedes and Deya again and camped together near Cheticamp
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    We managed to find a patch of grass right next to the ocean
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    It&#8217;s neat to see other traveler&#8217;s way of setting up camp
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    One minute it&#8217;s sunny&#8230;
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    &#8230;the next minute it&#8217;s overcast.
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    The four of us made our way down the cliff and built a campfire on the beach and shared desserts and travel stories; a perfect conclusion to a wonderful evening.

    170 km
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    Warmth from a campfire.​

    Thundering sound of ocean.​

    Twinkle from the stars.​
  10. azshtr

    azshtr Long timer

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    Will and Amanda... thanks so much for keeping this going. It's been almost 2 years since you started this journal! I'm looking forward to the conclusion!

    Go KLR's!
  11. PacificPT

    PacificPT Long timer

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    This continues to be a great thread, thanks for continuing to take the time to share it with us.
  12. Oldone

    Oldone One day at a time!

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  13. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    Thanks for tuning in! It's been been a pleasure updating!


    September 11th-12th, 2010

    No need to wait for the alarm clock to ring this morning; the sound of wind and rain was enough to wake us up. Archimedes and Deya were early risers and were set on continuing despite the wet weather. Amanda and I on the other hand were in no hurry to ride in the rain and decided to sleep in for an extra hour or two. We wished them both a safe journey.

    The rain died down to a drizzle and we decided to seize the opportunity to break camp and not get too wet. Packing the tent in gusty winds brought back good memories of ol&#8217; Groundhog Hill back when we were holed up on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Packing the tent today proved to be a bit challenging, but was nothing compared to what went down on Groundhog Hill. I think it&#8217;ll take a tornado to top the windy conditions we experienced.

    Today we ride due west and our game plan for the next couple of days is to visit a family friend of Amanda&#8217;s in Hopewell. Wayne & Yvonne are originally from Strathroy, Ontario and had moved out east for work.
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    We stopped in a town called Antigonish and picked up supper at the Canadian Superstore. It started to rain again and we decided to wait it out. We kept ourselves occupied by perusing the magazine section and keeping up with current events. By the time the rain had stopped, the sun had already gone down and we decided to stealth camp out back. This picture was taken the next morning; ironically enough we camped next to Wal-Mart.
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    The next day we spent the majority of our time exploring the small towns of New Glasgow and Stellarton. We stopped at the library to keep in contact with family and friends and updated the ride report. Here we are at another Canadian Superstore treating ourselves to a deluxe pizza.
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    Doing my daily brain exercises on Amanda&#8217;s cell phone by playing the game Brain Genius.
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    We got a hold of Yvonne and found out that she works weekends so we decided to camp an extra day on the outskirts of Hopewell. We managed to find a public baseball field that can only be accessible by walking in. We were able to squeeze our bikes through the gate.
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    We met a couple taking an evening stroll and they pointed out an old bridge nearby worth checking out. Doesn&#8217;t look that old to me&#8230;
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    &#8230;oh wait, there&#8217;s more than one. The Hopewell Footbridge is one of the last surviving footbridges in North America built in the 1800s.
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    This picture was taken by hanging the camera on a wire. It produced a pretty cool effect.
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    Hooray! We crossed the bridge and it didn&#8217;t collapse on us!
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    244 km
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    Another wet start.​

    Fond memories of high winds.​

    No trolls under here.​
  14. Eagletalon

    Eagletalon Been here awhile

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    I have been following your RR and finally was able to get all caught up. I have to say that what you two have is very beautiful and is an amazing experience the one you have had with your lovely wife. I hope to someday be able to do the sme with mine. Be safe guys and keep on riding.

    Later
    John
  15. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    Thank you for your kind words. The trip sure brought us closer together. I hope you and your wife can do the same thing too. Thanks for tuning in!


    September 13th-14th, 2010

    This morning we had a hard time trying to decipher the directions Wayne had given us to their place. Eventually we stopped at a house alongside of the road and asked for directions. The man was nice enough to let us use his cell phone to call Yvonne & Wayne, but his wife had difficulty accepting us. For no reason at all she started cussing and yelling at her husband and the man just simply ignored her as if she wasn&#8217;t even there. We felt awkward and wanted to get going before things escalate, but Wayne knew where we were and insisted it would be better off to come to us and lead us back to their place. So there we were, waiting at the side of the road while the lady went from yelling and cussing at her husband to yelling and cussing to herself out in their backyard. Frankly, I found it quite entertaining, but I think she might have one too many loose screws in her noggin.

    Hanging out with family friends Yvonne and her sister Kimberly
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    We met the family cat&#8230;
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    &#8230;and the family dog
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    She was a bit of a wild one. She would get that twinkle in her eye&#8230;
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    &#8230;and then BAM, she was all over you. Feisty one she is.
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    We had roasted chicken and homemade mustard pickles for supper. The mustard pickles were really good.
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    Dessert made from scratch. Yvonne and Kimberly were raised out in the country and their mom naturally passed down her knowledge of the culinary arts to them.
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    5-star accommodations were provided. I would live in a trailer for the rest of my days if I could; the simplicity and mobility strikes a chord within me.
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    The next morning we had fresh eggs from the range for breakfast
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    Amanda and Kimberly out on a nature walk&#8230;
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    &#8230;I stayed back at the house glued to Kimberly&#8217;s iPod Touch. I have a soft spot for technology and gadgetry.
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    While Yvonne and Amanda were in the kitchen making homemade jam later that afternoon&#8230;
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    &#8230;I was out in the yard changing my rear tire.
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    Shinkos were good, but I think Kendas are better
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    I don&#8217;t know how many times I&#8217;ve done this, but spooning on a tire has almost become second nature
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    Wayne made chili for supper that&#8217;s been cooking in the slow cooker since this morning. We then watched a movie from Kimberly&#8217;s vast library of anime DVDs to conclude the evening.
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    Out in the country.​

    Cooking lessons 101.​

    Catching up with friends.​
  16. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    September 15th, 2010

    Today we ride north to a town called Caribou Island to take the ferry to Prince Edward Island. The toll system that they use to get on the island is unique in that you only pay once; when you get off the island. Since it’s free to enter, we found out to our advantage that it is much cheaper to enter the island using the ferry because it is much cheaper to exit the island by way of Confederation Bridge on the west side. Since most visitors enter from the west, they end up paying more using the ferry upon leaving. Lucky for us, this was not the case.
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    We met a rider from Germany on his Honda Trans Alp while waiting to board the ferry
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    We should be experts at tying down our bikes on ferries by now
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    Although Prince Edward Island is the smallest province in Canada, it is here in the capital city of Charlottetown where the birthplace of Confederation took place in 1864. The Charlottetown Conference was the first meeting in the process leading to the Articles of Confederation and the creation of Canada in 1867.
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    Prince Edward Island is known for its lush agricultural lands, Anne of Green Gables, seafood, and potatoes.
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    We stopped at the visitor’s centre to congratulate my sister for getting married. She had a surprise wedding for friends and family, which we initially thought was only going to be a surprise proposal from the groom to be.
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    It was raining on and off, but we managed to continue riding through the southeast part of the island before making our way towards Charlottetown. Not only did we manage to find a place to camp next to a soccer field, it had a porta-potty for us to use as well.
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    136 km
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    Garden of the Gulf.

    Named after The Duke of Kent.

    Birthplace of nation.
  17. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    Oddometer:
    583
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    September 16th, 2010 pt.1

    A walk around downtown Charlottetown was in order for this morning.
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    On the waterfront at Victoria Park
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    A short jaunt to Prince Edward Island National Park was next on our list. Since it&#8217;s the beginning of the off season, admission is free.
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    Clouds in the sky look kinda dicey. I hope the weather holds up.
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    We noticed motorcycle tire tracks in and around the beach area. They must&#8217;ve used this ramp to get down to sea level.
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    To the right you can see the red cliffs. The soil is red because it has a lot of rust and iron in it, which acts as natural fertilizers. This is why their potatoes taste so good!
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    Here&#8217;s a thought! Lobster for supper tonight&#8230;
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    &#8230;I think we&#8217;ll need a bigger pot.
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    Covehead Harbor Lighthouse built in 1967
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    There is a plaque on the side of the lighthouse describing the Yankee Gale that struck in 1851. The gale claimed at least 74 ships and 150 lives
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    24 km
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    Named after the Queen.​

    Northern shores of the island.​

    Earth as red as blood.​
  18. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    September 16th, 2010 pt.2

    From Prince Edward Island National Park, that same day we rode to a town called Cavendish where the farmhouse of Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery is located.
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    L.M. Montgomery is known for her novels about the fictional character Anne of Green Gables.
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    There was an admission fee to enter the property, but sneaky Amanda managed to find a used sticker on the floor by the exit that verifies that she had supposedly paid. Having already been here on another motorcycle trip 2 years ago, I stayed back to watch the bikes while eating Fritos.
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    The book Anne of Green Gables, published in 1908, has been translated into 36 languages and is taught to students around the world. The novel is very popular in Japan where it has been on the school curriculum since 1952.
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    Anne Shirley, the imaginative red-haired orphan
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    Like a glove
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    The farmhouse where L.M. Montgomery lived and wrote her novels overlooking the fields of Cavendish
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    Living room
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    Laundry room
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    Dining room
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    Kitchen
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    Shelf for the fine china
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    Sewing room
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    The barn
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    Giddy up horsey!
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    38 km
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    Road to Avonlea.

    Barbeque corn chip goodness.

    Red headed icon.
  19. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    September 16th, 2010 pt.3

    From the Green Gables Farmhouse, we rode to North Rustico to pick up supper. We’re not messing around tonight. We’re going to treat ourselves to something good.
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    There was a house by the side of the road that was selling fresh vegetables and we decided to check it out
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    There was no one to take your order, just the good old fashion honor system. There’s absolutely no way we’re leaving this island without trying one of their infamous potatoes.
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    We found the perfect spot to camp in an area that was closed off for the season. The gate kept cars from entering, but not us.
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    Fresh carrots & potatoes in tomato soup…
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    …along with a pot of Sidekicks broccoli cheddar rice…
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    …and fresh scallops and shrimp right out of the ocean to top it off.
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    Fresh from the garden.

    Caught from the Atlantic Sea.

    An improvised meal.
  20. job3-14

    job3-14 Been here awhile

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    Oddometer:
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    September 17th, 2010

    This morning we were plagued with wet weather once again. I think we got rained on more times in the last couple of days than any other time I can remember. Thanks to the picnic shelter, we at least get to start off dry and not have to pack a wet tent. We decided to take up PavementPounder’s invitation and ride towards New Brunswick; the last province to visit before Amanda and her bike will have ridden through all of Canada with the exception of Nunavut.

    The crummy weather has tainted our Confederation Bridge experience. I remember going on an east coast road trip with my family when I was a little kid and saw the first stages of construction.
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    If you recall, we met PavementPounder and his family on the Trans-Labrador Highway. They live near a town called Shediac.
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    Lobster capital of the world
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    I wouldn’t have guessed it, but PavementPounder is a fantastic chef. The potato pasta you see here is made from scratch. We were stuffed to the gills.
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    Things started to get out of hand when PavementPounder’s wife came home from work. The party drinks started flowing and we all know what happens when you feed Amanda the combination of energy drinks and alcohol after midnight; insert Gremlins theme song now.
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    You go girl! Burn off some of that extra energy. That is a gigantic bolt by the way.
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    It’s bedtime now Amanda; you need to turn it down a notch.
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    151 km
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    I’ve had it with rain!

    Never feed after midnight!

    Gourmet chef at work.