1290 SAR dog build

Discussion in 'Hard. Core. (1090/1190/1290)' started by random1781, Sep 17, 2020.

  1. random1781

    random1781 Been here awhile Supporter

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    A couple people have asked about how the setup I use for my dog to ride on the bike. Since I'm new to the 1290, a lot of parts are backordered, and this is on going project, I figured I'd make a dedicated post about it.

    On my old GS, I didn't really need to do much for a decent setup. There was so much space with the stock aluminum cases that essentially all I did was replace the rear seat and rack with the BDCW Helo Pad, bolt together a backrest with a couple brackets and aluminum stock, bungee a bed on, and looped in some slings to secure him in. On this setup he sat perpendicular to the bike, stretched along the panniers. He had enough space to move around a bit, lie down, sit up, etc. but had limited reach because of the tethers.

    This isn't the case with the 1290. I wanted to get rid of the bloat I had on the GS, so no hard cases, no things jutting out the side, and ideally something modular. He's now sitting in line with the bike, which means less space for him, but also better protection from the elements and I think he's boxed in better.

    To get up and running ASAP, I came up with an initial design that's ugly but works pretty well. Ignoring the trial and error, it's really simple and doesn't require a whole lot:
    • 4-5 ft. 1" aluminum angle
    • 4x M8 bolts, washers, and nuts. I think I got M8x60.
    • 4x 1" spacers for the M8 bolts
    • 2x 8" metal brackets
    • Cheap plastic dog kennel
    I cut the angle into two 27" pieces (you could probably get away with a bit shorter) to use as a frame for the kennel. These will be bolted on to the stock rear rack with the flat side up, extending as far back as possible, and using the spacers to provide support, basically like this:

    4032-3024-max.jpg

    I wanted to raise the whole setup so it would clear the stock seat. While it does clear the seat, I didn't have enough room to actually remove the seat with the kennel on.

    Since the kennel wasn't on a completely flat surface, it had a bit more flex than I was comfortable with, so I added the 8" brackets directly on top of the angle using the rear bolts. I drilled holes in the kennel to match the bolt pattern and just stacked everything on top of each other, so...

    Rack -> spacer -> angle -> bracket -> kennel -> big washer -> bolt

    I don't have any great pictures of that setup up close, but you can get the idea here:

    IMG_20200907_172844.jpg

    I put some adhesive velcro on a dog bed and on the kennel and it stays put.

    I have since received the BDCW pillion and rear plates, so I removed the frame and brackets and just bolt the kennel directly to those plates:

    4032-3024-max2.jpg

    This isn't ideal since I need to unbolt it to get to the battery, but it works for the time being. I girth hitch a strap on each pannier rack to use as tethers for his harness.

    Other than relying on a plastic kennel, the main problem with this setup is that it's angled down towards the front of the bike. This isn't much of a problem on the road, but I can't stand up on dirt for long, otherwise the he has to constantly brace himself:

    dog.png

    I'll probably go to a hobby shop this weekend to find some high density foam that I could cut into a wedge and put in the kennel to try to level it out for the time being.

    I found someone to design and weld a permanent setup out of aluminum sheet, but that's about a month or so away. My basic requirements for that are:
    • Built on a frame - this allows for...
      • Smooth surface...because I wouldn't want to be sitting on bolts
      • A quick detach system - I want to be able to easily remove it to get to the battery compartment or just work on the bike or whatever. If it's bolted directly to the plates that's not possible.
      • Adjustable angle - it'll pivot around the rear so I can actually make it flat relative to the ground and avoid the forward slide. Is being adjustable necessary? Probably not, but having it adjustable isn't much more to add and is easier than the trial and error of guessing what the ideal angle should be.
      • Modular - the BDCW plates are drilled to the rotopax pattern, so it should be easier to adapt to another bike
    • Tether points - ideally something central so he has a single-point tether and something recessed to minimize how much it sticks up.
    • Other mounting points - for bungees and straps and stuff, but I'd also like to make some type of roll cage thing both for added protection and something I could strap some fabric to in order to block rain and wind during the winter.
    • Front lip - basically I'd like the bottom near the front to angle up a bit to help prevent sliding regardless of the angle I have it at.
    So that's the plan right now, hopefully there will be more to share soon...comments/suggestions welcome!
    #1
  2. Antti

    Antti Been here awhile Supporter

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    How the rides started with the dog at beginning?
    #2
  3. comradecasey

    comradecasey Long timer

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    My comment is: that rules. Unfortunately I do not think I have enough preload left for both my fat ass and my dog's fat ass (160lb Bernese Mountain Dog) :rofl
    #3
  4. LandofEnchantment

    LandofEnchantment Been here awhile

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    I think I like dogs better than motorcycles.

    but together?

    That’s pretty awesome!

    Here is my fuzzy baby!

    07A1B4B0-76DA-449C-991A-A1380D6EB028.jpeg
    #4
  5. random1781

    random1781 Been here awhile Supporter

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    First in the pannier...it only took him a couple trips to get comfortable.

    1-1.jpg

    Then on the back seat...

    3-1.jpg

    2.jpg

    Then I got rid of the back seat and top case, added the BDCW plate, and surrounded him with dry bags...

    4.jpg

    Then he got the kennel...

    5.jpg

    Then he learned to ride...

    6.jpg

    Then I ditched the kennel, put together this really stabby backrest, and this is what he's been on until I changed bikes...

    7-2.jpg

    @LandofEnchantment he's an Albuquerque dog

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    #5
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  6. whipit1k

    whipit1k Long timer

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    wow, he gets around quite a bit! I have put my rat terrier Freddi in her crate and strapped it on my 1290 for a few rides, but she seems pissed off at me when we get to our destination lol. females....
    #6
  7. BlackDogCycleWorks

    BlackDogCycleWorks Long timer Super Supporter

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    We appreciate that a BDCW rear rack is carrying a black dog :clap

    -Black Dog Cycle Works
    www.blackdogcw.com
    #7
  8. random1781

    random1781 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I'm finally getting around to having a long-term carrier built for the dog. Right now it's looking like this:

    Screenshot from 2021-08-12 15-17-17.png

    There will be three quick-release mounting points here:

    mount_points.png

    The frame is going to be made from aluminum angle.The panels themselves are either going to be made from fiberglass or carbon fiber. Carbon fiber is definitely not necessary, but would just be cool. The slots cut in the panels will facilitate either molle webbing to be woven in or stuff to be bolted on. What's going to be attached? Lighter and/or frequently used stuff, like dog food, recovery straps for the bike, misc cables, and a spare camelbak.

    There are tabs on the top rear to provide more rigidity. It's not shown here, but there will be small panels going down from the tab to 'round off' the back so it's not square and so there aren't any exposed sharp edges.

    The piece going across the front adds rigidity, but also serves to lock in the cushion. The whole BDCW plate angles downward at about 16 degrees, so rather than correcting this with an angled frame, a wedge-shaped cushion/bed will do the trick. We were going to butcher an old foam mattress for it, but it seems like custom-cut foam is pretty cheap, even if you have multiple densities layered on.

    Comments/critiques/suggestions are welcome!
    #8
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  9. C Minus

    C Minus Adventurer

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    I just wanted to say I love this!!!
    #9
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  10. Deviant

    Deviant Long timer

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    With him strapped to the back you'll just drag him if you fall. And we all fall at some point.
    #10
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  11. random1781

    random1781 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Yeah this has been the ongoing debate and dilemma. We've tried to imagine every way he could get hurt, which is both depressing but necessary.

    For his first setup, the biggest risk I think was him losing his balance and sliding off. It was basically a platform with a backstop. The area was huge, so he was able to shift around fine and get his footing, but there wasn't really anything preventing him from going off the sides, so he got strapped in.

    With the KTM and the current setup, I have a paranoia of the plastic snapping. He has a tendency to plop down towards the back of the box, which really stresses it out. It's doubled up, so at least if one breaks there is still another, but I still get nervous of it failing and him falling backwards, so I've also kept him strapped in.

    All of this is dependent on what we're doing too. Off road he's generally unclipped. If the terrain gets technical and I expect to drop my bike, I let him off and he runs in between us. He gets to stretch his legs and we're going slow enough that it's not a problem. This itself took concerted training for him since he initially had a tendency to want to be right next to the bikes, which is obviously problematic.

    Currently I'm playing around with clipping him in using one of these...

    qr.jpg

    ...and tying the pull-pin to myself. The *intent* is that if he just slips off, the strap will catch him, but if I do actually drop the bike and we are separated further, the pin will be pulled and release him. This takes a lot of planning to actually get right, and I don't really have a great way to test that, so how effective it might be hopefully will never be discovered.

    All that said, I don't intend on strapping him in the new carrier. It'll be over-engineered for strength and he'll have a much more boxed in and leveled platform to guard against missteps. This is the really dark side of hauling a dog around, but it's really important to constantly think about and reassess.
    #11
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  12. Deviant

    Deviant Long timer

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    It's cool that you can take him around. But if he's strapped in and you have a get off him being attached to the bike, I think, is the last thing you want.

    I met Mike and Deacon a few years ago at a KTM rally. He had a "saddle and stirrup" set up so the pup could ride on the tank. He's not strapped but still stable.
    https://www.facebook.com/deacontelerover
    https://www.youtube.com/c/TeleRover/featured
    #12
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  13. random1781

    random1781 Been here awhile Supporter

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    During a crash, definitely. If equipment fails or if he falls off the side while riding, definitely not. It's a balance of determining what's more likely to happen.

    But the main goal of rebuilding this is to mitigate the risk of equipment failure or tumbling off, which at the end of the day means being untethered everywhere.
    #13
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  14. thirsty 1

    thirsty 1 Rider Supporter

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    This is a very cool thing you have going on here. I’m sure that’s one happy little pooch !

    :thumbup:thumbup
    #14
  15. random1781

    random1781 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Fiberglass test cutout...

    signal-2021-08-17-195010.jpg
    #15
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  16. random1781

    random1781 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Finally made it out to my brother's place. He's the smart one who's building this thing for me, and it's looking pretty awesome:

    PXL_20210825_190103534.jpg
    It's not quite done yet, but hopefully by tonight it'll be actually attached to bike. The actual mounts need to be added and the frame finished.
    #16