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12K Wethead Service Pictorial

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by JimVonBaden, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    95,287
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    This is a pictorial of the 12K service on the R1200GS Wethead. The GSA/R/RT and RS are all basically similar. It is not 100% complete, but gives you enough of the basics to do your own if you have some basic skills.


    Here is the service schedule for the 12K:

    [​IMG]


    Starting with the bodywork, IF you are doing your air filter. The GS is here:




    GSA and RT bodywork videos are here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe9ldcMvw4zsXbUaYrDc_Fw


    I would be happy to film the RS and R if someone local wants to donate their bike for it.


    Removing the filter can usually be done by only removing the tank cover. Depending on the bike it can be that simple. See the above videos. Most bodywork screws are T-25, with the center tank cover being T-30.


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    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    My air filter looked like this:

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    Next onto the oil.


    Drop the bash plate if you have one, T-20 Torx.



    Then use a 10MM Allen to remove the plug.

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    ]


    Check the plug for gritty metal particles. It should feel soft like a paste.


    Install the plug and torque to 42 Nm.


    Now pull the filter and change it:

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    [​IMG]


    Don’t forget to make sure the seal comes off, and clean the mating surface.

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG][/URL
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    Add a bit of oil to the seal and reinstall to 11NM


    [​IMG][/URL
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    We will refill after checking the valves.


    Next we check/adjust the valves.


    Remove the crash guards, or other protection. Then remove the valve covers. Make sure you take off the wire covers first.


    T-25 Torx for the covers.

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    [​IMG][/URL
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    Then remove the wire from the stick coil with a flat blade screwdriver:

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    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    Next pull the stick coil. I used a Marc Parnes puller.

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    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    Then use a 14mm spark plug socket and remove the plugs.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    Now pull the valve covers. You will lose about 1-2 oz on the right side, and 4 oz on the left side. If you are doing valves without an oil change, catch the oil in a clean container and pour it back in after you are done.


    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    Left and right:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    Now rotate the engine using the rear wheel in 6th gear to reach Top Dead Center.


    This is how you tell. Flats aligned with the bar codes opposite each other. This is the same on both sides.

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    The specs are:


    Intake .10 - .17 mm

    Exhaust: .34 - .41 mm


    Intakes are on top:

    [​IMG][/URL
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    Make sure the lobes are facing away from the engine.


    Check between the lobe and the follower.

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]

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    [​IMG][/URL
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    See the feeler come out behind the cam. Make sure it is lined up with the cam.

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    Exhaust valves are similar, but from the bottom up.


    Pop off the rubber cover, and check your clearances:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    If the feeler doesn’t fit, go one size smaller. If it slips in easily, try the next size up. Record your measurements.


    Mine:

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    Note that my clearances were good except for the left intake right valve. Since this is the case, I needed to change the shims. To do that, the cams need to come out. Since my right side exhausts were at the minimum, but still in spec, I did not change shims there. I will go back in in a few thousand miles and see if they move. Then change them.
    #1
    socalnative, CharlesH, eri and 15 others like this.
  2. ExodusRider

    ExodusRider ExodusRider

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    Oddometer:
    2,123
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    As always, nicely done Jim..
    #2
  3. adv63

    adv63 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2018
    Oddometer:
    43
    Location:
    British Columbia
    Fantastic info! Thank you.
    #3
  4. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    95,287
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Pulling the cams is a little past the scope of a simple online tutorial, so I will just show a few photos, using the BMW tools.

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    I installed the BMW tools, cam chain tensioner, timing plug and cam alignment tools.

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    Pull the cam covers, T30 Torx.

    [​IMG][/URL
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    Pull the offending shims and measure them:

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    [​IMG][/URL
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    Use the very cool Shimulator from inmate Dirty T!

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    Figure out what shims you need and swap them out.


    Reinstall the cams, making sure they are aligned properly and check to make sure the gap is corrected and inline with the specs.


    I took the opportunity to ensure the cams were aligned and timed correctly, they were off a bit. This is covered by MarcHyman on his thread:
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/using-any-gsw-special-tools.937091/


    Reverse install the valve covers, making sure to remember the rubber plate under the valves. Torque the valve covers T-50 Torx to 10 NM.


    Next on to the FD. You really only need to change out the oil, which is as easy as draining it and refilling with 180 ML. BUT, I like to drop the FD to check the splines and driveshaft.


    I fully covered this process here: https://advrider.com/f/threads/r120...ive-change-and-spline-lube-pictorial.1129815/


    This is what I saw:

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    Still clean, lots of lube, no real rust, and the U-joints felt firm and no slack.


    Next the brakes. While it is covered here:
    http://www.jvbproductions.com/R1200_2007_brake_bleed.html The Wethead is basically the same, with some differences.


    Fronts first. Open the brake cover using a T-20 Torx, then draw out most of the fluid. Failure to do this will be messy if you push the pistons back first.

    [​IMG][/URL
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    Then remove the 13mm bolts and wiggle the calipers loose:

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    [​IMG][/URL
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    Then insert shims to push the pistons back.

    [​IMG][/URL
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    [​IMG]


    Fill the reservoir with fresh fluid. Then pump up the brakes, hold the handle and release the pressure with an 8mm wrench. I use Speedbleeder bags to catch the fluid.

    [​IMG][/URL
    ]


    After I put it together, I bleed again to ensure the fluid is clean, and at the right level. Reinstall the reservoir cap and torque the T-20 Torx to 6nm


    Off to the rear:


    Basically the same as the front. Drain the old fluid, and add fresh, then pump, hold, release, and repeat until the fluid is clean.


    This is covered elsewhere in much more detail, but I thought I would share here.


    The rear takes an 11mm wrench.

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    Bonus, when done, I pope out the brake caliper pin holders and pins, sand them clean, then add anti-seize and reinstall. This keeps them from dragging and uneven brake wear.

    T-30 Torx:

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    The rear is two clips and a pin the pushes out, same process though.

    [​IMG]
    #4
    CdnGS, CharlesH, nobody0101 and 16 others like this.
  5. falcofred

    falcofred aka Beer Scout Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2008
    Oddometer:
    10,424
    Location:
    Extreme N.E. Tennessee = Motorcycle Nirvana
    Jim,
    Why remove the calipers and push the pistons back just to put in fresh fluid and bleed the brakes?
    I always just removed old fluid from reservoirs with syringe and or paper towel, refilled with fresh fluid and bled until clean bubble free fluid came out.
    #5
  6. Lead Wrist

    Lead Wrist Mehr Gelände Weniger Straße

    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Oddometer:
    13,829
    Location:
    Zer0-Zer0-Zer0-Zer0
    ...to get as much if not all of the old brake fluid out... If pistons are not pushed all the way back to their "home" position, there's old brake fluid in the system which, although small amount, will contaminate new brake fluid... :deal
    #6
  7. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    95,287
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    The leftover fluid in the calipers is the worst of the fluid. It is the fluid that got hottest, and sometimes it is contaminated by an imperfect piston seal. Best just to get as much as you can out.
    #7
    equ, mikegc, falcofred and 3 others like this.
  8. sizzlingbadger

    sizzlingbadger Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2013
    Oddometer:
    606
    Location:
    New Zealand
    It's good to know they move freely and don't bind too.
    #8
    JimVonBaden likes this.
  9. equus ferreis

    equus ferreis n00b

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2016
    Oddometer:
    6
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    I am finishing routine maintenance on my 2016 R1200 GSA and found an odd 2-piece part on my rear inside brake pad:

    IMG_9174.JPG IMG_9176.JPG

    It appears to be a polymer against the pad carrier plate and a thin stainless steel that clips on tightly and it is only on one side in the rear. Nothing like it on the F/R of pads hitting pistons. In all my research, I cannot find reference to this unit anywhere. The Carbone Loraine replacements do not come with it. It is also not in the BMW parts diagrams for the rear brake assembly. I have owned the bike since new and this is the first new rear pads at 27K miles so I presume it came from the factory like this. I'm replacing the pads and wonder if I should reuse it or just only install the new pads like everyone else seems to do?

    Also a minor nit perhaps, but the BMW repair manual says the back side of the carrier plate and the plate face should be lubed with antiseize. Perhaps to keep from sticking I suppose. Not done on the fronts it appears. Any thoughts on this, albeit minor, detail?

    Also want to thank Jim for saving my FD shaft. I took his recommendation and found spline rust. Also found some on the upper spline so decided to do it right and pull the shaft for rework. Following his guidelines at advrider.com/f/threads/r1200gsw-lc-wethead-final-drive-change-and-spline-lube-pictorial.1129815/, I ended up with a nicely cleaned up and lubed FD. Thanks for that JVB!
    #9
    JimVonBaden likes this.
  10. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    95,287
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Hi,

    The factory pads often have these anti squeal plates. Most aftermarket plates do not. On occasion you can swap them over from the factory brake pads to the aftermarket pads. When I used the Carbon Loraine brake pads I did not use the anti squeal plates, but I will usually use some anti squeal spray on the backs of the plates.

    https://www.autozone.com/greases-an...nmsDFHnIo6q4gOTUxukaAheQEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
    #10
    equus ferreis likes this.
  11. atwoodtja

    atwoodtja Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2004
    Oddometer:
    833
    Location:
    New England, US
    With regards to the oil change and valve adjust combo, I would highly recommend putting a big piece of tape over the ignition keyhole or start button saying "No OIL" if you are going to leave the engine empty in between. Or fill it halfway for safety sake before doing the valves; it won't leak, but it will have some lube if the engine is turned over. Its just too easy to get distracted and forget to fill it before you start the bike up. Yes, the bike has an oil pressure alarm that you hopefully would notice before any damage occurs, but why chance it? You also skipped the engine oil refill step in the instructions, btw.
    #11
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  12. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    95,287
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    If you pour some in before removing the valve cover you will just dump a bunch out when you pull the right valve cover. But, good to make sure you fill the oil before starting.
    #12