1966 Ducati 160 Monza Jr Rebuild

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by DesmoDog, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

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    I've heard from a couple other guys that my speeds are about right for a stock 160... but while mowing the lawn today I decided I need to build a "hopped-up" engine for it. So the search for a suitable donor engine has begun. Using the existing engine puts too much pressure on not screwing up. I haven't got the time or money to be doing something like this but what the heck, why let that stop me? I'll do as much of the machining that I can by myself, beg some of the other stuff from guys I work with, and see what happens.

    My 350 may NEVER get finished... which I suppose is pretty stupid since by default I'd already be at about twice the power with that to begin with, no? I've got a 250 I could drop in there already but that'd be cheating...
  2. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    My 160 had a 29mm DelOrto and a rather laughable pipe (I think the PO had made it out of electrical conduit!) with a aftermarket "shortie" muffler on it. Surprisingly, it did not sound bad. I put the 29 on it, and it really woke the bike up.
  3. jpkennedy71

    jpkennedy71 Adventurer

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    Just a beautiful, stunning build you've done :clap

    After reading all that, I have but one question: what did you end doing for a front sprocket?
  4. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

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    Thanks for the comments. I finally found a "correct" sprocket. I don't remember where now...
  5. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

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    The adventure continues!

    Over Valentine's Day weekend I sent in a registration form for the Motogiro USA East. when I was putting the bike together, I envisioned doing a 'giro on it. I figured it was about time to actually do one. No word yet if I got in or not, but if I do get in, the bike will need work. Not the least of which is a functioning speedometer.

    As luck would have it, On Friday the 13th I had finally ordered an Acewell speedometer for my 350 project. I've been tossing the idea around for years and while surfing the Acewell UK site I discovered a model I had never seen before. I ordered it around Midnight on Friday, it got shipped on Saturday, and today my lovely wife picked it up from the post office for me.

    [​IMG]
    It's an Acewell MD052-302. 52mm diameter so I knew it'd fit in the headlight shell. I had been considering an Ace-2856 but it was a touch big, and I didn't want to mod the headlight. Plus, the smaller one is simpler, with less features I'd never use.


    I got a couple other goodies with it too, namely a shiny bezel and a speed sensor that screws onto a stock speedometer drive. I had a feeling it wouldn't fit an old Ducati drive but I took a chance.
    [​IMG]


    When I tried to take the plastic bezel off I noticed it was cracked. No biggie, I wasn't going to use it anyway.
    [​IMG]


    I tried unscrewing the bezel but it would NOT budge. Screw that. I took a leap of faith and brought out the saw. No returning it now!
    [​IMG]


    Even with two cuts in the bezel it was hard to get off but brute force wins again. I think the sealer they use to make the lens water resistant was the culprit?
    [​IMG]

    No worries, the chromed bezel is on it so it looks more "stock" aside from the size and the face. I think a guy could come up with a vinyl face to hide the LEDs without much problem, I haven't decided if it's worth the effort yet.
    [​IMG]

    This unit also has a temperature function that I won't be using, but I could get a sensor that goes under the plug I suppose. Maybe if/when I put one on the 350 I'll do it but not for the 160. I didn't order any sensor with it but it came with one. It won't fit a Ducati engine though.

    Also, the speedo sensor is for a later model speedo drive (with a lrger fitting) so I'll have to get a newer drive or mod an old one to work. Push comes to shove, I also got a generic magnetic sensor, i just have to figure out how to mount it if I go that way.

    The beauty of it is, it doesn't matter what ratio the speedo drive I get is, or that I'm not using stock wheel sizes. Just calibrate the Acewell to whatever I end up with and everything's good.

    Next up I'll be making a bushing to fit the 52mm speedo body into the 60mm hole in the headlight shell.
  6. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

    Joined:
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    I started cutting a bushing out of aluminum to make the speedo fit the headlight shell, but before I finished it, I gave some rough dimensions to a buddy who printed one out at home on his 3D printer. The first one is out of cheap material just to see how it works, when I finalize the dimensions he'll make one out of some softer material for me so it has a little give to it.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A little tweak to the inner diameter and a test fit. Don't mind the tach mount on the right, it goes away now since the Acewell is a tach too.
    [​IMG]

    Works like a champ. Except the headlight shell I used as a pattern doesn't match the one on the bike so the fit is a bit off… but that's nothing that can't be fixed in the final version. Good enough for mock up. Now on to working out a way to drive the speedo.

    Almost forgot, to use this on the 160 I have to find a 12v power source. I was going to add a second battery, but instead I ordered a 6v to 12v converter. One battery covers both the 6v and 12v circuits, no charger needed. All in all I think this is going to work out pretty well. (The converter is only needed if I use this on the 160, the 350 is going to be converted to 12 volts).
  7. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

    Joined:
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    I went downstairs to clean up the shop so it'd be easier to work on things. Got bored instantly. Instead I put a little more time into the aluminum insert.

    [​IMG]

    This headlight shell will likely end up being painted silver. The one on the 160 already is. I'll probably just polish this up and use it as.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Or maybe not, now that I look at the pics I may take more off of the OD of it.
  8. jas67

    jas67 Long timer

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    Absolutely gorgeous bike, a job well done! :clap

    Tell me about that "fake battery."

    I just acquired a 250 Monza that has the same sealed 6 volt battery. On my bike, it is stuffed in the tool box. I'd like to relocate it to the battery tray to free up the toolbox for, well, tools.

    I'd love to have one of those "fake batteries" to put, it, and a small 6-12 volt convert in. The converter is to run 12 Volt LED lights, both headlight (ADVMonster), and tail/stop.

    Thanks!
    Jay
  9. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

    Joined:
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    993
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    Michigan, USA
    Thanks for the comments.

    I've forgotten where I bought the battery box but it was probably guzzino.com

    http://www.guzzino.com/chhoet.html

    I've bought a lot of parts from there, he's got some cool stuff.

    So now tell me about the LED headlight (for my 350)! :evil
  10. jas67

    jas67 Long timer

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    If the headlight sealed beam is the same size as my 250, which is a 4020, then it is 5 3/4" in diameter. That is a standard automotive size. Hella, Cibie and others make H4 reflector lamps that replace a 5 3/4" sealed beam. If you can find a Cibie, they have a convex front like a sealed beam. Hella and the rest seem to have a flat front. The convex front will look more correct.

    Get an ADVmonster H4. You might need the "Mesh Monster" to fit in your bucket. I haven't checked the depth yet to see if anything is in the way. Check our the ADVMonster thread for more info: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=976505

    Here is the 6-12V converter that I purchased:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JKG57T4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I don't have a schematic handy, but, the plan is to separate the lighting wiring from the rest, and leave the igntion wiring alone. I'll then connect the input of the converter to the switched 6V supply, and power the lighting circuits from the output side. If it ends up being too difficult to separate the wiring, plan B is to just run 12V to the head and tail light, disconnect the wiring from the lamps, control solid state relays with it, and then switch the 12V to the lamps. That would require four solid state relaces, high + low beam, tail + stop.
  11. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

    Joined:
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    Michigan, USA
    Thanks for the info. This would be for my 350, which is going to run a 12v system.

    As for the 160, if you're ok with running a total loss system to the lights it should be pretty simple. The 160 doesn't need a battery to run the engine so just wire up the lights/switches and keep the ignition out of the mix.
  12. Gornzilla

    Gornzilla Registered Slob

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    Location:
    Sacramento, California
    I put in a Electrex ignition to replace the faulty magneto sold to my by a certain itchy Australian. Huge difference! Although I did like having points, I'd prefer working lights.
  13. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

    Joined:
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    Michigan, USA
    My annual 160 ride report.

    I registered to do the Distinguished Gentlemen's Ride on this in Detroit, so thought it might be a good idea to do a shakedown run first. That run became a trip to a "Ton-Up' bike/music show in Ypsilati, which is about 21 miles from my house. It was relatively cold and raining on and off, but I decided to go anyway.

    I got there with no real drama to speak of, riding it wide open a large percentage of the time. No one seemed to notice… Once there I parked the bike along the street, pulled the old iphone I was using as a speedo off the triple, and walked over to the show area. One of the first bikes I saw was owned by a guy I know, and he convinced me to register mine and park it next to his bikes. So I walked back and got it.

    Fun fact to know. If you shut off the gas on your 160 when you park it at one end of the blocked off street, then start it up and ride to the other end of the street, the engine will run just long enough that you can coast up to the registration table. Perfect. Yes, I meant to do that.

    The weather was keeping a lot of people away. I hadn't planned on staying around very long, but one thing led to another and wouldn't ya know…

    [​IMG]

    Ok, so… truth be told, the only other Italian bike being judged that I saw was a 1098 with digital camo that really didn't fit the "feel" of the show…

    Here's a pretty bad shot of all the class winners. By this point I really just wanted to head out but had to wait through all the door prizes and official picture taking etc…

    [​IMG]

    The ride home wasn't all that pleasant. I was cold, my left wrist was NOT happy with the clutch lever ergos, and I didn't trust the bike to idle so there was a lot of blipping the throttle at lights, and I wanted to stay in gear so the clutch was pulled in, but with the damp cool weather my shield was fogging, and basically it would have been nice to have three hands. Oh, and only the rear brake has a light switch on it, so I was trying to use the rear brake to slow down while downshifting. Trivial perhaps, except the bike has the brake lever on the left and a reverse patterned shift on the right. A heel/toe shifter at that. I ride it once a year, I wouldn't say the process came naturally to me.

    There was one intersection I was mostly worried about. I have to make a sharp left downhill off a right hand curve that is basically the start of an entrance ramp for a freeway. To add to the excitement, this was during the tail end of a traffic leaving a Michigan football game. I got on to the road leading to the turn without much traffic around me. Sweet. I was coming up to the turn and there was someone stopped, waiting to turn left onto the road I was on. He sees me. He's looking right at me. MotherF'r he's pulling out… I can't change lanes or I'll end up on the freeway. Can't have that, so I'm on the brakes hoping not to get run over from behind, waiting to see what he's going to do.

    He stopped half way into my lane. I went around the front of him and made the turn. I may have referred to him in not so pleasant terms as I went by. He was backing up and rolling down his window as I went by. I didn't stop to talk, I was f'ing cold, angry, and just wanted to cross one more busy street (the exit side of the freeway jumble) until I was in my "safe" zone as it were.

    In hindsight, I was already slowing down to make the turn, so it wasn't like I was going to run into him. I think what threw me was I had to brake harder and earlier than expected, and I was worried about getting hit from behind. Luckily no one was behind me but I doubt I'll be taking this bike out alone on "real" streets again any time soon.
    Cogswell likes this.
  14. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    ^Congratulations on your well-deserved award! :thumb
    Sympathies for the ride home, but glad to hear you made it okay.

    Your description of the difficulties in operating the controls in sub-optimal conditions reminded me of riding the 160 waaay back in 1973, when the clutch cable end went "pop" during a trip (and I cleverly had no spare), and rode the 20 miles to camp (including all the way across a small city) with no clutch (and no stopping). All I'll say is that I'm glad that they kept the sidewalks clean.:D
  15. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

    Joined:
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    And now for the 2016 annual update

    News for this year is... The mighty 160 has been sold. I took a deposit for it yesterday and suspect it will be on its way in the very near future. It will stay in the Ann Arbor area and will likely be even more visible than it has been for the past few years... If you know where to look!

    It's time to put resources into my long neglected 350 and my new problem child 851.
    Nixels likes this.
  16. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2009
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    It's official... I dropped the 160 off at it's new home tonight. A lone Italian in a sea of German cars. At least they're all around the same age...

    Attached Files:

    Nixels likes this.
  17. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

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    I ran into an old buddy of mine at the watering hole yesterday who needs to sell me a 1965 Ducati 160 Monza Jr.
    that he's had/rode for 30 years but it ran when he parked it in his finished basement but now the motor's seized for $800....
    I'm not sure if I want a 9 hp motorcycle.....
    What say ye?
    Nixels likes this.
  18. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

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    Michigan, USA
    No one can really answer that but you. Know that as far as Ducati singles go it's entry level without a path to being a contender. Not many parts from the bigger singles fit, it was built to sell cheap so the forks are junk and the wheels are a weird size. The good news is it's slow so none of that really matters.

    I had fun with mine but in the end I sold it to someone who wants it more to look good sitting in his shop than to ride it. If there were motogiro events nearby I may have used it more? I dunno...
  19. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

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    I'm not getting any "Fun Factor" vibes here...:johntm

    Can you still get parts for the thing, or is it a dead end?

    Is $800 'diculous?
  20. jas67

    jas67 Long timer

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    I have a 250 Monza. The 250 makes double the HP at about the same weight as the 160. It's fun to ride, but, not very quick at all. It is a bit show compared to my R75/5, thought, lighter and more "flickable". I would think that the 160 is dog slow. Though, if you made it as pretty as DesmoDog's, it would be beautiful garage or living room art.