1995 R100RT Classic - Sudden engine cutoff

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by Muravey, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. Muravey

    Muravey Folk you.

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    Hi, folks! Long time no type. The important part starts a few paragraphs down, after you see "trouble" written in bold red.

    So I just bit the slowest bullet in history, and I'm glad I did! Bought myself a Bee-Em-Double-You! Dream come true. My first "new" bike, after years spent on Muraveys, Jawas, Dneprs, a Moto Guzzi and other such creatures.

    I said "slowest" because I met a lovely German couple who were touring around Europe for the nth time on their BMWs - this was two years ago. The gentleman rode an R1200R. The lady pulled up on a gray 1995 R100RT Classic. Had only seen the latter in pictures (we don't have them in this part of Europe) and had dreamed about one for years already. I took it as more than a mere coincidence that one just happened to pull up in front of the shop I worked at. The lady got off the saddle, walked in and asked politely if I could help with a flat rear tyre. They had caught a nail some couple hundred kilometers back. The luckiest nail in my life! Here's a shot from their photo album, the day we first met:

    IMG_20190716_172610_crop.jpg

    And help them I did. They let me keep the bike for a whole day and I was hooked! Long story short, I promised I'd save up money and buy the thing from them once I'd be able to. Check us out (boy, was I chubby!):

    IMG_20170929_170639_LI_Moment.jpg IMG_20170930_131252_resize.jpg

    Fast-forward two years later to our time: the gentleman sadly lost the fight with cancer, the lady almost ran out of patience after the initial 3 month deadline and I barely scrounged up the cash. But scrounge it up I did. Went on the roadtrip of my life all the way to Northern Germany with my small trailer, homemade wheel chock and everything. There were even a few stops in between, which made for a lovely journey. But that's a story for another time. Still, it warrants a few photos:

    IMG_20190716_125131.jpg IMG_20190716_131022.jpg IMG_20190716_131050.jpg IMG_20190716_150832.jpg

    Will post more if you so desire.

    Got it home and registered it after a lot of hassle. Fixed some minor stuff, like some superglued air intakes in the fairing that were rolling around from vibration. Installed the plate. Went for a 50 km (35 mi) evening ride and I was in heaven. Best sound, best feeling, best ride ever!

    But now I'm in trouble, guys. I'm in trouble. :doh

    The next day it died on me. Suddenly, on the open road, at about 40 mph / 60 kph. Total loss of power on both cylinders, with a loud backfire a few moments later, as I was coming down to a stop still in gear - all while trying every single roll-restart trick learned along the years on my old Commie-block bikes. Even boxers.

    I don't know BMW airheads, this is terra nova for me. But the trouble seems definitely electrical. First thought it's fuel starvation, but it never happens so clean or sudden, neither does it kill both carburetors at the exact same time. Pulled out the fuel lines - gasoline gushing out. Went back to electrical diagnosis. Bike could restart for a few sparks on both jugs, then it would die again. Could even restart it throttling up, but still only got a second's worth of engine activity, then complete cutoff again.

    Pulled out plug, grounded it against the cylinder head. Started the bike at idle on the remaining cylinder, saw the spark how it misfired every third or fourth cycle (mirroring the stuttering activity on the working side) - and, surely enough, it died again in an instant.

    Still got lights and everything. Checked fuses between seat and tank, nice and tight. Checked kill switch and bypassed it with a delicate screwdriver - no difference. Moved coil wires a bit under that barndoor fairing - same. Waited for it to cool off a bit and the restart got me about half a minute of engine works, then the circus came back around.

    I dread the notion that my coil's busted. Checks out with a multimeter at 0,5 ohms in the primary and slightly more than 12,8 kohms in the secondary. But it was a hot 90F / 32C day today.

    Trailered it to my folks' place, took the gas tank off, snapped a few pictures. Looked pretty clean, apart from the dust. Noticed old paste between the ignition module (is that what the Telefunken bit is?) and its heatsink. Also, the right-hand coil wire had a lot of play in the coil output (Bosch twin coil, "red plugs"), but can't tell if it's been like that before or if it started after I pulled it out by the side of the road. Fixed it temporarily, started the bike (cold this time). Idled and revved fine for about a minute; you can see the rest in the video below.

    IMG_20190811_195048.jpg IMG_20190811_200602.jpg IMG_20190811_200611.jpg



    Should mention it has more or less sat over the past two years, except for the occasional garage-5-min-start-and-idle routine. I know that long storage periods tend to "dry off" (for lack of a better term) electrics.

    Any leads on this? Thank you kindly!
    #1
  2. UnclePete

    UnclePete Been here awhile Supporter

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    Yes , the Telefunken item is the Ignition Control Module , and very likely the cause of your problem .
    Separate the module from the heat sink , clean the old heat sink paste off , then apply new .
    If it does not fix the problem nothing is lost , since it is due .

    Also , at a minimum , every new to me bike gets all electrical connections checked and cleaned , valves adjusted , and carbs balanced , along with fluids and other lubes .
    #2
  3. Muravey

    Muravey Folk you.

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    Thanks, Pete! Will do that. Got some gooey white DRG33 heatsink paste sitting around. Should be adequate, I think?

    IMG_20190812_203857.jpg

    But wait - there's more! :hmmmmm

    After doing some research today and suspecting the ICU as you do, I found that the rather expensive airhead ICU can be replaced by a number of much cheaper aftermarket modules designed for older VWs, Porsches, Audis and the such. This gentleman demonstrates it:



    Further digging revealed that the OEM automotive code for the equivalent ICU for Audi & Volkswagen is 191 905 351 B. Some of the compatible cars from the late 80s and early 90s:
    • Audi 80, 90, A6 Avant, A6 Sedan, Coupe
    • Volkswagen Golf 1 Cabrio, Golf 2 Hatchback, Jetta 2, Passat Sedan, Passat Hatchback, Passat Variant, Polo Hatchback, Santana, Transporter 3 Bus / Flatbed / Van
    What I found in terms of equivalent aftermarket items available in Eastern Europe:
    • AUTOMEGA - 309050351191B
    • BERU - ZM012
    • BOSCH - 0 227 100 142
    • BOSCH - 0 227 100 137
    • FACET - 9.4007
    • HB ELPARTS - 19010022
    • HELLA - 5DA 006 623-031
    • JP GROUP - 1192100300
    • JP GROUP - 1192100302
    • MAGNETI MARELLI - 940038503010
    • MAPCO - 80871
    • MEAT & DORIA - 10005
    • MEAT & DORIA - 10006
    • MEYLE - 100 905 0005
    • QUINTON HAZELL - XEI20
    • REMCO - 301-1663
    • SWAG GERMANY - 30 91 7192
    • TOPRAN GERMANY - 102 925
    • didn't work on my bike, see post below - TRUCKTEC AUTOMOTIVE - 07.17.013
    • VALEO - 245521
    • VEMO - V10-70-0048
    Needless to say that your suggestion boosted my morale. :clap I went ahead and bought a cheap (~$10 in local currency) Trucktec 07.17.013 module. Looks nifty enough:

    IMG_20190815_020759.jpg IMG_20190815_020809.jpg

    Will swap the original Telefunken 12.14-1 244 477 out tomorrow and see what happens. Worst case scenario - won't work at all. Better worst case scenario: if it turns out not to be the culprit but still work fine, I will have bought a spare for the toolkit while having spent a minimum amount to scratch this problem off the list of suspects.

    Will keep you posted. Does the "bean can" sensor behave similarly troublesome when going bad?
    #3
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  4. raywilson

    raywilson Been here awhile

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    Beautiful bike! Welcome to Airheads
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  5. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    My suspicion:
    High probability it is the 'Hall Effect Switch' (HES) in the 'bean can'. they usually fail as things get hot, then come good when cold. this is located under the front engine cover where the alternator, diode board are.. caution when removing this cover you can short out the diode board and kill it - disconnect the battery negative terminal at the battery before removing/replacing the cover.

    As the HES sits in the engine it gets hotter than the ICU so tends to fail more often. Electronics do fail more frequently if kept at higher temperatures.

    Some fault finding information:

    Electrical power to the engine when the engine is stopped will be indicated by the instrument red warning lights - if those are on then the fuses, kill switch etc are ok and there is no need to test those.

    The bean can has a 3 pin electrical connector under the front engine cover. If the central pin is shorted to earth and then unshorted you should get a spark, if not then the suspicion falls towards the coil/ICU areas. The shorting is done when the connector is separated (there is a wire bail that makes separation difficult) and performed on the lead going up to the ICU (not the bean can side).

    As the thing fails when hot possibly use a hot air dryer to raise the temperature for testing. And for cooling use some cold water thrown over the bean can. Note that it will take some time for the heat to go in or out of the bean can.

    --------------
    The bean can sensor itself cost is ~$30 and can be replaced if you have the skills. Alternative is to by the sensor with plate and wires and connector .. not as cheap but less skill required to swap those. Motobins have them .. as will others. Get in before Brexit.
    #5
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  6. Muravey

    Muravey Folk you.

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    Thank you, Ray! :) Still can't believe I have my very own airhead.

    So I went ahead and pried the original Telefunken unit from its heatsink. The paste was indeed old and dried up. Put a good smudge of new DRG33 white paste and bolted it back together. No change in the bike's behaviour. I can get about a minute of sparking until it starts missing sparks like crazy. :(

    As for my replacement ICU? Well, it didn't work. :becca It sparked, but weakly. Couldn't start the engine with it. And it squeals faintly while the ignition is on. Either a defective unit or incompatible with the airhead's setup. Bugger, but it was worth a shot (less crap to take apart). Will give that side of the deal a bit of a rest for now.

    As you suggested, I turned my attention towards the bean can today. Having spent the better part of the week reading up on the process of repairing it, I opened up the front engine cover. Puppies stole a screw from the fairing today, I think.

    IMG_20190815_201655.jpg

    Was glad to see that everything looks tidy, if a tad oily on the sides:

    IMG_20190815_201001.jpg IMG_20190815_201007.jpg IMG_20190815_201017.jpg IMG_20190815_201052.jpg IMG_20190815_201109.jpg

    The bean can is a model 0 232 102 001 with a 1 230 500 148 lid on it and, as expected, there are no physical signs of trouble:

    IMG_20190815_202743.jpg IMG_20190815_202750.jpg IMG_20190815_202801.jpg IMG_20190815_202748.jpg

    I will take it apart and document the process as good as I can. Gonna have to look up the best price/delivery time option for a sensor. :mully

    Apparently, complete hall sensor plates that use this type of sensor are available as aftermarket replacements for a number of vehicles, including the ones I listed in my previous post. An example seems to be this Abakus 120-09-012, though I've already failed once in my enthusiastic predictions and will take a more cautious approach this time. :baldy

    Again, thanks for the advice! I'll be back.
    #6
  7. ccmickelson

    ccmickelson MonoMania Supporter

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    I'm betting that all of the ignition components are good and there is just a bad connection somewhere. It's easy and cheap to rule this out first. It just takes an hour or so to go through the entire bike (which you might as well do, since it's sat for so long). Just methodically go through all of the connections, including grounds on the frame and engine and disconnect and clean them with something like this...
    615sexJNW8L._SL1499_.jpg

    Use dialectric grease on the high current connections like for the positive battery terminal, spark plug wires where they plug into the coil and the main B+ at diode board. That ICM you have (with the turquoise lettering) is the most evolved version of that component so don't throw it away! Most (if not all) of the aftermarket versions are unreliable crap. Also, try spraying some WD40 into the little inspection hole on the side of the bean can before taking it apart. That trick has worked for me a number of times.
    #7
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  8. Muravey

    Muravey Folk you.

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    Found fresh trouble and poked it with my superhuman fingers:

    IMG_20190816_005555.jpg

    Thanks for the tip! Although this bike's got an impeccable-looking wiring loom (miles away from all of the other projects I've worked on), checking it is on my to-do list anyhow. Weekend coming up.

    How does one go about unplugging these 4-pin connectors?

    Mufe cum naiba.jpg

    Morale boost up to 11. :clap

    Ummm... where exactly is that hole? Asking for a friend. :D Seriously though, I could only find a sheet metal-plugged oval hole.
    #8
  9. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    That is the hole .
    But do not use WD40... it is fine to start with but dries to a sticky mess after some time. Use plain oil, target the weight pivot areas, you can see then as you rotate the inside.If your going to replace the HES you will have far more access to lube things while you do the replacement.


    Caution. While other vehicles may use the same HES they may not use the same mechanical mounting.. I'd get one intended for an airhead unless you can see one that is physically compatible.

    The bean can ear can be glued back on so you can clamp it .. better if it is welded but glue for the time being.
    #9
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  10. UnclePete

    UnclePete Been here awhile Supporter

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  11. ccmickelson

    ccmickelson MonoMania Supporter

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    Ouch. JB Weld might hold temporarily but as Warin suggests a weld would be better.

    I've never had any repercussions using WD40 in the bean can and gotten long-term results, but Warin probably knows the topology of the inside of that thing a lot better than I do.

    You can grip those connectors with a pair of needle nose pliers or such to disconnect them. There aren't any clips holding them on, just a tight fit. I'm sure they've never been disconnected since the bike rolled out of the factory over two decades ago.

    Your bike is literally one of the last of the airheads and the last monolever BMW ever produced. The last of the breed...
    #11
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  12. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    From the factory there is a thin wire clip around the circumference. Best to remove it before you damage the connector. I and I am certain others have thrown this bit of wire into the 'parts bin' never to be seen again. My connector has never rattled apart despite many miles of washboard/corrugations and the absence of this bit of wire .

    @ ccmickelson The wire I describe I found on my bike ... yours may have been removed before you got to it. I regard it as an encumbrance of over engineering.
    #12
  13. boxerboy81

    boxerboy81 Stay Horizontal

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    Have you inspected the coil for a crack? Yours should be the later better version but it is 24yo so worth a look. Also, the the HT connection to the coils can get a tad loose and even get green down in there.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #13
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  14. ccmickelson

    ccmickelson MonoMania Supporter

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    I'm not sure we're talking about the same connector. I think you are referring to the connector at the ICM with the spring clip? The OP's pic is referring to the four large control harness connectors that go through the bracket on the right side of the frame. They un-plug from the front side and the rear half is clipped into that bracket.
    Inked2B272600-8AE9-4C5C-B1E6-F85C2B6AA02F_LI.jpg
    #14
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  15. Muravey

    Muravey Folk you.

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    Thank you for this! Been hoarding up on bean can literature. At the rate I've printed this stuff out, I'm gonna need a few big folders on my shelves...

    Thank you for the tip on the connectors! Will try to squeeze contact cleaner in every place I can reach.

    As for the bike being the last of its kind - I had a full two years to dwell on that before I got it. If - in the beginning - I lusted over the earlier models' spoked wheels and classic mudguards, right now I've got a rather warm sense of proudness that I just can't shake. :)

    I did get a look at it the first time I took the fuel tank off. It is indeed the later model and it seemed to be in very good shape. Didn't look like it's got any cracks. The two outputs were immaculate inside, no green oxide to be found. It also tested out fine at 0.5 ohms in the primary winding and about 12.8 Kohms in the secondary.

    Of course, as far as I know coils, they might have a shortcircuit that only becomes apparent when they get hot.

    THANK YOU for this! Great article! Gave me a lot of confidence in the swap. Will go sensor-hunting around the city in the following days, as I'm not willing to spend twice the money and wait for at least a month for the AliExpress / eBay options right now.

    Thank you for the picture!

    --------------------------
    The Bean Can!
    --------------------------
    So I took the bean can apart today. Figure I'd write this as a wannabe-tutorial of sorts, because it looks better than an obvious "am I doing this right?" wall of text and it feels good to be able to give something back.

    Anyway, I'm sure it's easier to do if you're wearing (any) clothes and if you've got anything larger than my tiny table-clamped vise, but it was a hot day, I've got no A/C and was hell-bent of doing this in my apartment. Today. So. :)

    For others doing this, make sure you research thoroughly beforehand. The Internet provides. I'll mention the following articles:
    1. Snowbum's article on airhead ignitions - be sure to scroll down to the last tenth of the page, where he talks about replacement sensors.
    2. David Braun's "Ignition Trigger Repair Bulletin" - very no-nonsense article about the process of taking the necessary precautions and what-to-dos when approaching this.
    3. "Ignition Sensor Overhaull" - well-written and nicely presented article on how to take it apart, lube and put it back together.
    4. Scot Marburger's "R100GS Auto Advance Refurb" - good photos and text on disassembly and maintenance (no sensor replacement) of the bean can
    Obviously, others have written more involved stuff on this subject, so I'll just point out a few things. Worst you can do is not document the order of the washers (there are plenty). Scratch everything or mark it with a Sharpie before you take it apart. This will really help at the end, when you're left with a whole bunch of loose bits and bobs.

    One of the more involved things is removing a pin that holds the bean can's front "claw" (camshaft interface) in position. Before you do that, notice that the claw is asymmetric. Scratch or mark its position on the axle before taking it off. Next, instead of hip-hugging it like I did, have a friend hold the bean can level with your vise, as you lean the claw itself against the vise's two jaws. The idea is to support this claw while you punch the pin down. I improvised with a socket wrench for a while:

    bean can collage 0.jpg

    After punching the pin out, the claw comes off. There should be 4 washers underneath it. From the first one directly under the claw to the last, you should have: 1 small metal shim, 1 bigger metal washer, 1 blackish soft washer, 1 bigger metal washer.

    bean can collage 6.jpg

    There are two screws on the top of the can (opposite the side with the claw you just removed). Take those out. Impact screwdriver is not required, but you should find well-fitting screwdrivers or screwdriver bits if you hope to break these screws loose without stripping their heads. Top cover will come off. There are two more screws underneath, they fasten the top bearing holder of the shaft to the bean can body. Scratch / mark this holder's position in relation to the body, then take the screws out and pull out the holder.

    Under that holder you'll find a giant circlip (it runs around the interior diameter of the bean can's body) with two threaded holes in it. The holder you previously took off screws tight in these two holes. Before removing that circlip, scratch / mark its position in the body. Best to put everything back together as it was when you're done repairing.

    bean can collage 1_Resize.jpg

    As for taking the circlip out - no pliers required, just use your hand to hold one end in place and a thin flathead screwdriver to pry the other end out of the groove.

    Next, remove the three remaining screws on the side of the body. Before actually removing the internals, scratch / mark one of the tabs and body inside so you'll have an easier time putting it back together. Notice the tabs:

    IMG_20190816_185408.jpg

    The black rubber boot holding the sensor wire in place has a small plastic tit in it. Pull it straight out from the body before you start removing the internals. There might be burrs left on the shaft end where you punched the pin out. If so, buff them out before pushing the axle (with all of the internals attached) out of the bean can body. Use an appropriate socket or punch to push / gently hammer the shaft out.

    Two more washers on the bottom end, fitted in this order:

    bean can collage 2.jpg

    You'll be left with the centrifugal advance and sensor assembly. Mark off the position of the weights in the sensor plate before you proceed to the next step. I did it old-school and pray the marker ink holds up on that small round shaft tip:

    IMG_20190816_191624.jpg

    Carefully disconnect the two springs' outermost ends from the weights. You don't want to overextend them or bend them too much, as they are calibrated and you run the risk of messing them up.

    IMG_20190816_190145.jpg

    After you take them off the tabs, the centrifugal advance will come off in one piece. You will find one more metal washer between the centrifugal advance unit and the bottom of the sensor plate. It's smaller than the others, so the risk of accidentally mixing it with the rest is small (2nd picture below).

    After you pull the centrifugal advance unit, you'll be left with the sensor and rotor assembly. If you need to access the sensor plate, you must first take off the rotor. The rotor is a cup-shaped sheet metal piece, held in place by two circlips above it and one below it. You probably need not ever mess with the one below it. Props to you if you can get the upper circlips off with just a flathead screwdriver without sending them flying to another dimension.

    bean can collage 3.jpg

    Lastly, there's a plastic cover over the sensor itself. Don't pull it off directly. Instead, use a small flathead screwdriver to gently bend its inner tabs outward of the small groove in the shaft.

    As a sidenote, the circlip you see on the shaft in the two pictures below is the circlip that I told you sits below the rotor.

    bean can collage 4.jpg

    So, in the end, I was left with this sensor plate. Do you notice the white pitting on the plastic (circled in red) and the exposed metal on the other side of that sensor lip (circled in orange)? Do these apparent signs of damage tell us anything?

    bean can collage 5_LI (2)_190816113321.jpg

    I will look up a replacement for this sensor in the following days. Drilling the rivets out and fitting a new unit will be interesting. Fingers crossed that I don't mess up anything! Any thoughts on this so far?
    #15
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  16. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    My first post on this connector.. edited to just the connector detail.
    So it a connector under the front engine cover. So that would not be under the fuel tank?

    It is a 3 pin connector .. so not the ICM.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    Find the alternator? It is under the front engine cover. In there is the bean can. The bean can has one electrical lead and that lead has one electrical connector .. that is the connector I am talking about.. One side goes to the bean can, the other side goes upto the ICM.. but it is not the ICM connector.. only 3 pins on this one.
    #16
  17. boxerboy81

    boxerboy81 Stay Horizontal

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    #17
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  18. kcoralj

    kcoralj Been here awhile

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    It's not too bad of a job, keep the new sensor away from the work until you've cleaned all the chips from the assembly and work area, the magnet will grab anything in it's reach.
    The wires are very tiny, I used magnifiers to solder them but if I did it again i'd get some of those low temperature waterproof solder splices.


    #18
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  19. Muravey

    Muravey Folk you.

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    Thank you, Boxerboy! Greatly appreciated. However, at $25 a piece (and whoever knows how much for postage), I'm afraid they're a little outside my budget right now.

    Might be the way to go for me. Just got word from a friend that a local parts shop may have a H√úCO-HITACHI HC138154 in stock. If that doesn't work out, Bulgaria it may be...

    Noticed that today with the old magnet: it picked a ton of metal debris. I would've been in trouble without the heads-up, so it was much appreciated.

    Also, those newfangled solder-splices are remarkable! Thanks for the tip! Gonna keep an eye out for them.

    -----------------------------------​

    It's almost half past three in the morning here so I'll make this update brief. I finally got the time to tackle the sensor removal today!

    My sensor carrier and centrifugal advance carrier plates are - unfortunately - riveted together at the shaft with a sort of guide-bushing through which the bean can's shaft goes through. No way to take these two plates apart without destroying it. I say unfortunately because one of the rivets that holds the sensor onto its plate is hidden (from view and tool alike) by the centrifugal advance carrier plate underneath. There is also a small rivet that is used to keep the two plates in a certain position relative to each other. Despite it being attached to only the sensor plate, il also goes through a hole in the bottom plate.

    Rotating the two plates independently from one another still looks possible, provided that you remove that last rivet I mentioned or - as I read someone did - bend one of the plates enough so that the small rivet no longer interfaces with the hole it's supposed to sit in.

    I decided against bending stuff and took the cutting approach. This meant careful dental work with a dremel-esque tool to make enough space in the bottom plate so that I could access the sensor's rivet(s) from underneath. From then on, it was a matter of drilling out the expanded rivet heads and subsequently driving them out.

    IMG_20190818_161000.jpg IMG_20190818_161015.jpg

    As I found out, my bean can has a broken ear. Somebody glued it once at some point, but the joint failed. As I'm strapped for cash at the moment, my father came to the rescue with his legendary patience and made a kind of flange-collar from thick aluminium.

    IMG_20190818_171732.jpg

    It's designed to mount over the bean can, dodge all the obstacles inside the engine's front cover and clamp down the bean can to the engine block. It rests on a shoulder close to the bottom of the bean can, so it takes off all the stress from the bean can's "ears" themselves. Clever! Saved a few trips and some hard-earned money.

    And it'll work nicely for the time being, without the hassle of cleaning aluminium welds. Don't worry: at some point in the future, I'll consider welding up the broken ear as well.

    IMG_20190818_202636.jpg IMG_20190818_202648.jpg IMG_20190818_202657.jpg IMG_20190818_203037.jpg

    The oval holes proved superfluous, since the flange itself doesn't need to rotate along with the bean can. Timing can be set by simply loosening the bolts (easing up the pressure exerted by the flange on the bean can's "shoulder"), rotating the bean can and then fastening the bolts back up.

    Also, since I'd forgotten to show you, check out how nice the ICU looks with the refreshed white heatsink paste:

    IMG_20190818_200705.jpg

    As always, I'll keep you posted.

    P.S.: What size is the green seal inside the bean can? The one that seals the rotating shaft.
    #19
  20. boxerboy81

    boxerboy81 Stay Horizontal

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,812
    Location:
    Melbourne, Oz
    Looks like too much heatsink:hmmmmm
    I've never seen the Hitachi HES? It is identical?

    That $25 is Oz. Maybe cheaper than you think if Bulgaria falls thru. ;)
    #20