1st long trip on Ural... Load out pics?

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by TCXJWAGONEER, Aug 4, 2021.

  1. TCXJWAGONEER

    TCXJWAGONEER 89 Yamaha Zuma 50cc

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    About to do my first 2000 mile round trip on my Ural. Was hoping to get some pics of Urals loaded out and any info on trips would be good. I am interested in seeing where people carry multiple Gerry cans. and how they load out gear to optimize range and ability.
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  2. FLYING EYEBALL

    FLYING EYEBALL out of step

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  3. MGV8

    MGV8 Long timer Supporter

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    What's your range? Are you ever going to be outside of that from available fuel?
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  4. TCXJWAGONEER

    TCXJWAGONEER 89 Yamaha Zuma 50cc

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    I am getting 150 a tank(light on at 120 or so). I have planned and have gas stops under that number. I will be carrying 5L(2.5 Gal) can but I posted more to see different gear load out pics on a Urals. In terms of loading out fuel I was curious about people using Rotopax vs traditional Gerrys.
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  5. MGV8

    MGV8 Long timer Supporter

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    So about the same as my Beemer/Ural combo. 175 miles. I have taken the seat out of my car so I can carry all my kit inside of it. Every thing fits inside and I use the toneau cover to keep it contained. I have removed the Ural Windshield for more space. I do have boxes on the bike as well which lets me take even more stuff, I don't use :-) In reality I found that there was limited room in the Ural car with the seat installed and I would have had to stack stuff up on the outside. There is enough wind resistance as it is. My trunk is for tools and those day to day items you need easy access to. Maybe not really what you were asking but gives an idea what can be done.
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  6. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    P6191235.jpeg

    Two 20L rotopacs , mounted in a frame on the sidecar step. Like MGV8, removed the seat, then carried camping gear inside the sidecar. Immediate access items in a top case. In Fairbanks, picked up two extra insurance one gallon gas cans for the 250 mile stretch of tundra from Coldfoot to Deadhorse.

    Here camping on the Homer Spit in Alaska with the midnight sun shining bright.
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  7. TCXJWAGONEER

    TCXJWAGONEER 89 Yamaha Zuma 50cc

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    That is helpful. What Frame is that? Bolted to the foot step?
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  8. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    Had a welder fabricate it to fit the two gas cans. Yes, bolted to the foot step.
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  9. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    If you're thinking about taking 40 liters of gas, note that's 65 lbs of ballast. ALL of your camping gear probably won't weight that much. Putting it on the step like @CCjon is much wiser than mounting it farther forward on the side of the nose. Of course, carrying a load outside the load triangle is OK as long as you counterbalance it with another load somewhere else.
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  10. TCXJWAGONEER

    TCXJWAGONEER 89 Yamaha Zuma 50cc

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    I am thinking just a 20L can in that spot. That would put my range with all tanks around roughly 370-380 miles which is perfect. longest gas stop distances is 240 miles so I feel safe carrying that much extra. I am going to look at counter balance and weigh out each thing as I pack. I will report how I low out what.
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  11. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    URAL Ammo Boxes.jpeg

    For that run to Alaska, watertight boxes were needed for various pieces of gear, camping, food and tools. Note the larger Ammo box bolted to the underside of the sidecar trunk. All the heavy tools went down there. Wrapped in shop towels to eliminate constant banging from the ride. Their weight was a counterbalance to the fuel on the side step.

    A frame was created using exiting Ural bolts to mount another watertight ammo box as a pannier. Anything I might need daily when getting on or off the rig was carried there.

    Winter riding gear is not heavy but bulky. The large top case above the spare tire was for that type of stuff. Not much weight up there, but was watertight. The smaller Pelican waterproof case on the rear fender was for the laptop and the good camera. A small point-n-shoot camera was in the tank/map bag.
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  12. Fuzzball

    Fuzzball Been here awhile

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  13. Yankee Dog

    Yankee Dog Long timer

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    Can you provide more detail on how you attached the ammo can pannier. I looked at doing that, but cant figure out how to fab up a brace to stop it from flopping around.
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  14. Yankee Dog

    Yankee Dog Long timer

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    Tools and such go up front in my Polish boxes because I like the look and am a slave to fashion


    E85FFC53-4504-42A7-8A8E-DF5BEDD3059E.jpeg


    I use the OEM jerry can mounted on the rear of the car. Gives me an extra 75 miles which is plenty for my use. RaIn gear in the $20 used saddle bags. And since the missus claims the trunk I use a Ural branded top box for my stuff. The top box rides quite securely on the rear luggage rack.



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  15. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    ^^^^^
    Your weight distribution triangle is axle to axle to axle. The most dangerous area to add heavy weight is in front of the sidecar tub. Heavy tools are best in the trunk or down low in back. The Polish boxes are nice but better for lighter items.

    Even loose heavy weight inside the sidecar that can shift forward to the nose is dangerous. Have you seen the video of a heavy passenger sliding forward off the seat on a bump moving their weight into the nose that causes the sidecar nose to dip down and flip the rig?

    P6191235.jpeg

    Note the unmounted spare tire with an inner tube partially inflated, wrapped in plastic wrap, then ratchet strapped under the nose of the tub. Not much weight there. But it's low and hard to damage it down there.
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  16. CCjon

    CCjon Gypsy Rider Supporter

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    Here is the mount being fabricated.
    Last Mount cut.jpeg

    Drill holes to mount the box.jpeg

    Mount on the bike.jpeg

    The box never flexed or wiggled after thousands of miles riding. Used the existing two top bolts to hang it. Then a long bolt to hold the lower support... actually the design process started at the lower support point, then built up from there.

    Good luck with your build.
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  17. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    I'm guessing nobody or dog riding in the sidecar? If not, then put as much weight as low as possible and as close to being in line to the tub's wheel as possible. Keeping all of the weight as low as possible where ever it is on the rig is the best advice.

    I personally wouldn't block the air flow to the right cylinder on a Ural by mounting anything in front of it like Yankee Dog did. Urals need all the help they can get and sure don't need an excuse to have an issue.

    Here is our load for doing the CDR. Keep in mind that this is a load for two people. The yellow dry bags are clothes & sleeping bags. The black dry bag is the tent, ground cover along with tarp and poles. The stuff behind me are Kermit chairs and sleeping pads.

    Packed and ready to go.jpg

    I chose this location for mounting the Rotopax as I felt that it was the least exposed. I figured that the odds of getting hit from behind were a lot lower than from me over shooting a turn or something and plowing into a tree.

    Rotopax mount.JPG

    One one thing I would emphasize the most is to practice with your complete set up multiple times before setting out on big trip. We always do at least one weekend overnight "functions test" before setting out on a big adventure.
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  18. Yankee Dog

    Yankee Dog Long timer

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    66EEA9EA-0495-41C8-9DF3-FF98C09495DB.jpeg D4F61BC0-2E1C-4549-8840-B595BA7EE1C5.jpeg 291F157C-1C04-4606-ABB1-F95019D63C37.jpeg Folks been mounting boxes on their boxers for a long time without a problem. I know I didn’t have a problem with my 2005

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  19. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    But I did say: " I personally wouldn't block the air flow to the right cylinder on a Ural..." I said that because I personally believe that where you are riding, how you are riding, and how the rig is load, all need to be considered before you start changing the air flow around the cylinders.
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  20. TurTal

    TurTal Long timer

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    An air cooled engine does not need air moving across it to operate properly

    The fins are there to simply increase the surface area exposed to atmosphere

    Engineers factor in thickness...width and material conductivity of the fins to ensure enough heat can be drawn or sunk from the cylinder so that it stays within its operating range

    Think back when you were a kid mowing lawns...you didn't run pushing the mower so it would stay cool

    A finned cylinder is nothing more than a heat sink

    A Ural could care less if air is moving across the fins...it will sit there and idle till the tank runs dry without any ill effects


    Ask me how I know

    .
    #20