2/3rds of the True North East 2021

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by boulet_boulet, Sep 13, 2021.

  1. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    I’m just back from a 2,200 mile ride from Maine through Canadian wilderness and sharing some memories while the trip is still fresh in my mind. Complete information about this route can be found here - https://graveltravel.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3&Itemid=21 Props to the folks who put time into researching, exploring and documenting the route.

    My goal was to complete just sections 1 and 2 to Chibougamau, a place I’ve wondered about for years.

    I loved this ride. It affords good, sometimes challenging riding, remote wilderness experiences, fantastic landscapes and it engaged my interest in planning and logistics, along with my love of Canada, and especially Quebec. Highly recommended.

    One more thing: even though this doesn’t feel very epic, I’m reluctantly posting this in “Epic Rides,” since the site rules say that’s where rides longer than a week go. Rules are rules even if “epic” is a little grandiose for what I just did.

    And here…we…go…
    #1
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  2. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    In! I love riding in Canada and Quebec. True North East is on my list. Looking forward to your ride, even if it wasn't epic:lol3
    #2
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  3. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

    Joined:
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    Day 1, 217 miles, mostly off-road from home to Mactaquac, NB

    The goal for the day is to reach Mactaquac Provincial Park in NB primarily via Maine ATV trails. We meet up around 8:30 in my side yard ready to roll. My DR is packed and warmed up when Dick (Yamaha T7) shows up, followed by Jon (Versys 650), who is along for an undetermined amount of time and interested more in paragliding than riding, so he’s on his own plan. We then meet up with Chet (690 enduro) and Engie (500 exc) for a day one ride-along. These guys are slumming it with a DR for the day.
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    ^Packed and ready to roll

    We roll down the Interstate 95 of Maine ATV trails, the Downeast Sunrise trail for a fairly boring but better than slab ride towards Machias, where we hear north towards Rocky Lake and eventually Rte 9 aka the Airline Rd. After a packed lunch near a stream while Engie fiddles with his bike’s idle, we are off towards Rte 6, a roughly parallel road further north that runs to the Canadian border at Vanceboro / St Croix, NB.
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    Just before reaching the border we bid farewell to the interlopers and Dick, Jon and I ride on to what ends up being a fairly difficult and grown-in ATV trail. After a bad experience up this way a couple years ago (bad decisions, a fried clutch, more mosquitoes than I have ever seen anywhere and a ride/push out to meet a friend who kindly towed me home a couple hours) I wrestled with thoughts of turning around but was ultimately comforted by the presence of the two other riders that remained. We made it to Rte 6 after a few sketchy miles of grown-in trails and head east to the border.

    It’s 2021. Crossing into Canada is no longer a formality. You need to show up prepared (a fresh negative COVID test, proof of vaccination, etc.) and even then you can still get hung up with additional screening or surprise quarantine requirements. Thankfully, Jon, Dick and I get through with just a home test kit to self-administer. Sounds easy enough—we’ll swab and send our samples from the campground.

    Side note: I have been crossing the ‘closed’ border since it closed in March of 2020. As a dual citizen and with two kids at school in Canada, my crossing has been considered ‘essential.’ So with probably a half dozen or more crossings, this is the first time I have been given this test to self-administer. I did not know what I was in for.

    So we get through customs and slab to the Provincial Park. Jon didn’t bring camping gear because that would displace his paragliding gear, so he’s off to a hotel, a beer and a sandwich while watching the CBC news. Dick and I set up camp, eat and following the instructions that came with the self-test kit he contacts the Canadian nurse by video chat to administer the test. On Sunday. Of Labor Day Weekend. She walks us through the steps (wash hands, blow nose, counts through the swabbing with us, shows us how to close the package) and ends with “now put the test kit in the fridge until ten minutes before the Purolator Courier guys shows up.” Wait? Uh…we’re camping. She says to keep the test as cold as possible under the circumstances, which is something that ends up being not very possible at all.

    We hoped that we could leave the test with the campground for pickup there but unfortunately PC does not service that location. OK, no problem, we will just leave it at some PC location along the route. Right...

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    #3
  4. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    Day 2 and 3 combined, 340 miles, Mactaquac to Carleton-Sur-Mer, QC, then 232 miles (day 3) to Cap Chat, QC

    We awake in NB to a fairly wet forecast and the rain sets in not long after we’ve broken camp. Jon decides that the paragliding weather in the direction we are heading in sucks, so he peels off southward. He had been very noncommittal about the trip –75% sure he would be joining up until the last minute-- so this was not a surprise. All good.

    Dick and I press north to what pretty quickly becomes a fairly remote and wet day on NB logging roads. In other words, a day with no PC drop off locations for our unrefrigerated mandatory tests. We ride north primarily on gravel carpet, which are very quiet, this being Labor Day.

    We came across this sketchy, wet bridge that looked difficult to stay upright on because of the wet, off-camber wood. We found a workaround that looped through the woods and crossed the tame stream instead.

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    We eventually arrive at Serpentine Lodge, only we weren’t sure because there was no sign. I asked the guy in the yard if we were where we thought we were and if lunch was available. He says “yes sir, if you’ve got cash I’m there.” He fired up the kitchen and we had fries and a soda in the wilderness.
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    We continue to pass through a few New Brunswick towns and find closed drop off locations for our tests. Oh well, hell with it and we press on to Gaspésie where we camp at Carleton-Sur-Mer at the campground that is on a narrow jetty that juts out from and is visible from town. The weather has broken enough that setting up the tents is no big deal.

    I ask the campground in my pretty OK French if we can arrange to have a package picked up there and the nice campground lady says sure. A quick consult of the Purolator website shows that this is not a location that they will service. Grrrrr. The tests are weighing on us. We want to comply with the rules but we simply can’t. And we arrived at the border with a recent negative test anyway. Right or wrong this is starting to feel like red tape harassment to me.

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    I slept fairly well through a rain storm and awoke to my elbow in a puddle. Note to self: treat tent to waterproofing refresh. We decide to make the most of the day by riding Gaspe’s stunning trails (https://www.fqmhr.qc.ca/en/carte.php) towards the east to a PC drop off location that we eventually find not yet open.

    Tim Horton’s is calling my name, beckoning me with his promise of decaf, so we head there to kill some time. Only, like so many other places that I have seen in Quebec, there is a “Nous embauchons” (we’re hiring) sign up and the dining room is closed due to lack of staffing. It wasn’t worth it to me to ride my moto or walk through the drive-through, so we head back to the PC drop off location, find it open and the guy tells me we really are not supposed to ship that kind of package from there, it should be sent from home. I tell him we don’t live here and need to send it. So that’s that, the GD-MF test is finally off my hands, some 36 unrefrigerated hours after a nice nurse in Toronto taught me how to properly pick my nose. I’m half expecting to get a call from “Switch Health” asking me to come back to the border and start over but we really did the best we could under the circumstances (remote riding, holiday weekend). Anyway, it’s done.

    We got back to the campground a little later than checkout time but we manage to get everything packed before the golf cart police knock on our picnic table, get lunch at the local supermarket (which is currently being marauded by scores of grade school kids who are apparently let out for lunch, causing the register line to literally snake around the outside aisle to nearly the back of the store), eat at a local park and plan an off-road route across that stunning peninsula. (Note to self #2: spend more time riding in Gaspésie.)

    Have I mentioned that the off-road riding up there is stunning? It is. The trails offer incredible views, excellent elevation climbs and descents and is very well marked with clear signage. It also helps that I figured out how to get that FQMHR map onto my Garmin, something the FQMHR (Quebec Off-Road Motorcycle Federation) might not like very much but proves to be very, very handy.

    The goal is to get to the north shore of the peninsula by trail as much as possible. We take a trail that’s just to the west of town and make awesome progress crossing the peninsula when all of a sudden Dick, who is leading, scares the shit out of me and more importantly, a moose who was napping in the ditch. Monsieur/Madamoiselle Moose jumps up and starts huffing it up the trail / service road for wind towers and gives us the stink eye for a while from up the road. Because I am a moose expert after watching too many YouTube videos of Moose (Meese?) charging snowmobilers, we opt to give him/her a wide berth. The standoff lasts for maybe five minutes while s/he looks at us from down the roads and we’re both positioned to u-turn and burn rubber the hell out of there if necessary. The beast finally hops up the bank and off the road and we head north a little amped from the encounter.
    IMG_9474.JPG ^There really is a moose in this picture, I promise.
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    ^Maybe you can see him/her more here?

    We get to a trail juncture where we could continue by trail toward Cap Chat (Cape Cat) or toward Rte 299, the main slab artery that runs from the south to north shores and through Parc Nationale de la Gaspésie. It’s a beautiful road that puts us back on the TNE tracks. We opt for slab because it is getting late and don’t really want to set up camp in the dark.
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    Digression: The “TNE” route is truly fabulous but it’s unfortunate that they didn’t include a non-slab route across the peninsula. Yes, doing so would require that riders get an FQMHR permit, a not inexpensive proposition, but the trails ARE NOT TO BE MISSED IMHO.

    The night ends at Le Pirate Camping et Motel in Cap Chat, were we set up our tents behind a few rows of RVs and battle disappearing daylight to fix a blown fuse that powers my dashboard, GPS and any peripherals, including my air mattress inflator (see hack in my sig line). Thanks to Dick for inflating my mattress with his lungs while I fiddled with the bike.

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    #4
  5. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    For the trails, check out the iQuad app in the Google Play store. Not sure if they have an Apple version..
    #5
  6. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately Quebec ATV trails are not necessarily the same as FQMHR trails and the app obviously wouldn’t work on my Garmin, so downloading the linked map does just the thing.
    #6
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  7. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    Day 4, 232 miles, Cap Chat to Lac Noel, QC (aka middle of nowhere)

    We’ve got an 8AM ferry to catch at about an hour away, so we are up and at ‘em fairly early with the intention of saying bonjour to Mr. Horton while en route to Matane. By the time we really get rolling our boarding margin has narrowed enough and we still think we need to buy a ticket, so we skip Chez Tim and just press along the north shore to Matane. Kate and Anna McGarrigle are on my mind as I head in the direction of Matapedia. (Only I think the song is about a train coming from the opposite direction and isn’t going to Matane.)

    We arrive with a half hour to spare and the ferry attendant directs us to the very front of the line—motos first, I love this—and by the time we reach the line of fancier Harleys and ADV bikes, they are rolling onto the ferry, so we follow suite. We got there just in time and are shown where to park aboard the FA Gauthier and make ourselves at home near the café.
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    I had heard of the famous vaccine passport but had yet to see it in action. Here is the guy stationed on the ship to verify that you’ve got your two doses before being allowed to access the cafeteria. We sit here for a long time and it seems like folks are more or less used to flashing their QR codes to gain entry to “non-essential” services. Thankfully they accept my hand-written proof of vaccination from Walgreen’s and I get to have a bagel.

    The crossing from Matane to Baie Comeau takes about two hours and they let us off first – woot! Off go the fancy ADV bikes, Harley and my down-market DR to various adventures along the north shore of the Gulf of St Lawrence.

    We tippy top off with gas to the point that my tank vent tube is threatening to spew and north we go on logging roads into the unknown. What becomes clear fairly soon is that most of the people who drive on these roads have reason to believe that law enforcement is sparse at best up there. The speed limit is posted at 70K but pickup after pickup, as well as GIGANTIC logging trucks go well beyond that speed.
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    This is the part of the trip that caused me the most planning anxiety. There is no fuel between Baie Comeau and Labrieville, a stretch of about 225 miles. My approx. 245 mile range will theoretically cover it, but what if I got lost or came across a now impassable stretch and had to reroute? Would my 20ish extra miles be sufficient? What if my gas mileage suddenly plummeted for mechanical reasons, thereby limiting my range? I had decided not to buy and carry a supplemental fuel can and in the end opted not to sacrifice one of my water bladders to brief fuel storage. (Yes, I know this would be a bad idea to put fuel in a non-fuel-rated container.) I even considered buying a large Gatorade only to dump it out and use that for fuel. In the end I decided to just trust the bike and my experience with it. And I made extra sure to turn off the petcock when I stopped for the day.
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    So we rode this loop and it was again stunning. We were treated to many great views and utter isolation (save the occasional YUGE truck) as we rode for hours on end.
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    At a certain point we decided to look for a camping spot and a stream where I could get some cooking water. It took a while and we eventually settled for camping on an intersection on a clearly not well-traveled side road. Bonus: there was a fire pit there from a previous traveler with the same idea. Dick built a small fire and dried out his now very wet boots while the skies mostly held off from raining. I deployed the camp chair for the first time and made Sriracha sesame noodles for the third night in a row.

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    #7
  8. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    Day 5, 275 miles, the Middle of nowhere to St. Honore, QC

    We awoke to tents that were wet outside but dry inside—hooray! I dilly dallied with breakfast and breaking up camp in hopes that the clearing skies might dry the tent, to no avail. So the wet tent got rolled up and stuffed into the waterproof duffel. The thing about waterproof duffels is they are as good at keeping moisture in as they are keeping it out, so the tent was as wet as can be later that day and inside the back was becoming fragrant.

    Day 5 began much like day 4, beautiful scenery and remote gravel roads.
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    We rode to the end of the track to Labrieville. Once we got to the end of the recorded track, I didn’t see a gas station. Hmmm…. We drove a while with some anxiety building on my part until we came across a Hydro Quebec work camp. It’s kind of a weird thing really, going from nearly nothing to this grid of building and infrastructure in the middle of nowhere. I figured this is where we buy fuel so we pulled in. There was a big tank of gas and one of diesel. Surely in the middle of nothing this is how you fill a bike. I asked a worker and he directed me to the administration building, where we interrupted a smoke break that was being shared by the two women who eventually explained to us that we were in the wrong place; we wanted the ZEC (Zone d’Exploitation Controlee—the place where you have to pay a nominal fee for land use and register that you’ve entered and left) office 5-10 kilometers down the road. Ah. That makes so much more sense. So the ZEC guy sold us some gas and surprisingly we were able to pay with cards and save our Canadian Queenbacks. We also filled up with potable water at the ZEC office.
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    Next we headed westward on more logging roads towards north of Chicoutimi, more gravel carpet until Auberge 31 and sandy trails northward, eventually to “Fab’s Hill.” You know the old cliché about hills seeming flatter in photos? This hill was HARD, steep and full of loose baby head rocks. Dick went first on the T7 and dumped it. I clutched and waddled my way past him until I could safely stop and helped him pick his bike up the second time. This wasn’t exactly unfun, but it wasn’t quite the opposite either. Dick, who is in excellent physical shape, was huffing in my Cardo from uprighting the T7 and trying to pick the most palatable line up the long, steep, angry hill. We eventually made it without further incident and were just about ready to call it a day at that point.
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    ^If you look very carefully, you'll see a sideways T7 just off the trail.
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    We eventually reached the Lac Joly Campground in St Honore, run by a guy I nicknamed “Joe Cool” because of his general demeanor and how confidently he swaggered across the campground, escorting us to our site from his golf cart. I thought I might have misheard him when he told me camping would be $78 for the night but there was no mistake. The campground was something else too. It was stuffed full of camping trailers, each with serious improvements around them, ranging from woodsheds to decks, Canadian roller swings, fire pits and even a sauna. We were the random tenters in a sea of grandparents. To Joe Cool’s credit, the campground was impeccably clean and functional, and a striking contrast from our recent wilderness experience.

    At this point I had pizza on the brain and Mr. Cool told me to go to a restaurant a few KM away. Well, they were getting slammed and had run out of pizzas. Sigh. Across the street to the grocery and more noodles it was. Dick bought a 750ml “Maudite” beer to split and we made the best of it. I am not a huge beer guy but I do love the Unibroue Belgian style beers.
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    #8
  9. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    Day 6, 208 miles to La Dore, QC

    We rode along the north and west towards Lac St Jean. The scenery continued to rate as mind-blowing. The trail went along the eastern shore of Lac Tchitogama (and please don’t ask me to spell that ever again) as we rode along what felt to me to be a rough camp road. We waved at a couple of folks in the yard of a chalet and got to the end of the road in another few KMs. By “end of the road” I mean that literally.
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    There was a road and then there was a lake with a small ferry boat parked at it. Only there was not ferryman or ferrywoman to operate said craft. So, with one measly bar on my cell phone I called the numbers posted on the boat and in French said “HI, we are at the side of the lake hoping for a crossing. I don’t know how this works. Anyway please call me back at (XXX-XXX-XXXX)” and I proceeded to tell them my phone number wrong twice because of French number confusion on my part.

    Dick and I had our lunches at the picnic table they kindly left there. We figured someone would come someday. And then an hour or so after our arrival we decided to head back and ask the people we had waved to. Maybe they knew the secrets of the ferry schedule? We didn’t get too far before we came upon a speeding side by side being piloted by a burly guy in just a T-shirt, accompanied by a woman who was fully “done up” with aubergine hair, full make up and nail polish. I hailed them like a taxi and said “Hey, do you know how that ferry works?” They guy points to his barrel chest and says in French, “it’s me that you are waiting for.” “Oh, I hope I am not bothering you?” “No! Let’s go” and off the side by side goes at a speed I would not have dared ride myself. Apparently they had not yet gotten my phone message but they had seen us drive by and knew we could not get anywhere without them.


    We got back to the shore and he put a narrow ramp off the center of the boat, instead of having us use the somewhat mangled ramps that were already there. The steepness of the ramp and inability to dab my way up made this a somewhat dodgy and nerve-wracking entrance. I lucked out and stuck the landing just fine. Next, much to Mme Aubergine’s horror, Dick ended up sideways after he was 2/3rds onto the boat. I just shook my head and laughed (I think I knew he was OK because of the Cardo connection that I had and she didn’t have the benefit of. Or maybe I am an asshole and I just thought it was funny that Dick dumped the T7 again.). Anyway, apart from some embarrassment, Dick and the T7 were fine and the burly Quebec Ferry man helped him onto the boat.

    To aid future hopeful ferry users, the guy told me I should have called him the day before and gave me his card for the next time I want to cross Lake Titicaca North, or whatever it’s called. If that was in the info at Gravel Travel or in another ride report, I totally missed it. Here is the info:

    Les Traverses Roger Simard
    418-481-1354 or 418-818-2587
    Facebook – messenger: ”Les Traverses Roger Simard”
    lemieuxsandra@sympatico.ca
    On the back of the card it says: “ *Important – By Reservation* ”
    We chatted on the brief crossing. She said they live there year-round and have everything – internet, electricity, phone service. She said there are about two weeks each spring and fall when they can’t cross because the ice is either not hard enough for snowmobile or too soft but they are well-stocked and love it out there. I can certainly see the appeal.
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    Back on the road, we made our way to a detour. Instead of following the tracks north into the woods towards Chibougamau, I had decided to avoid what one user of this forum had dubbed the “Sugar Sand Highway.” That inmate had suggested that I skip this section because a lot of the bridges were out and the riding was primarily on very loose terrain. So I drew another route in Basecamp that took me to Chibougamau via some blueberry barrens and, eventually, slab. But I am getting ahead of myself.

    Day 6 ended with us finding a municipal campground called “Les Chutes d’Ours” or “Bear Falls” which is situated along some very wide and loud rapids on Riviere-Aux-Saumons (Salmon River). This was a lovely facility with more of the same ‘grandparent infrastucture’ as the last one. The tent sites have a sandy surface and are right along the very loud river. No need for a white noise machine that night.
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    Attached Files:

    #9
  10. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

    Joined:
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    Day 7, 456 unintended miles, La Dore to Chibougamau, to Quebec
    Day 7 brought the question – keep going or change plans? Should we go to Chibougamau in the face of an iffy weather forecast?
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    Dick said we’d come this far, might as well. So we took the aforementioned detour through the barrens onto the slab that runs north to the ‘Mau. So we zipped north with little fanfare, riding for a few hours flanked by trees and streams and lakes and little else, landing in town just before lunch.
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    I don’t know what I expected but Chibougamau was much more built up than I had imagined. It makes sense that a town of 7,500 people that surely serves as a service center community for far and wide would have stuff in it, but I hadn’t imagined it that way. There is a wide Main Street, people out and a considerable in-town neighborhood of well-kept homes. I can’t say that I spent enough time there to get a feel for the place, but I was surprised at how not rural it was.
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    So we finally got that pizza. And then we turned around and headed south for a mostly slab day. I had actually drawn a route using Kurviger that looked really interesting, but on closer inspection I could not find any evidence of gas stations along that route for 260 miles. Rather than chance it, we played it safe.

    Right about when we got to the shore of Lac St. Jean we started talking about an early night, a hotel and the again foreboding forecast. That was in Métabetchouan–Lac-à-la-Croix when that conversation came up. There were lots of nearby hotel options there but we were not quite ready for hang it up for the day, so south towards Quebec City we went. This was about 4PM and I thought, there has to be a hotel or two in the 140 or so miles between LSJ and Quebec City. Wrong! Endless divided highway and pretty much nothing else is found between those two spots. That would have been palatable if not for...

    An interesting lesson from the road: when you’re a couple hours past when you intended to stop but can’t because of a lack of lodging options in the middle of nowhere and your fully laden bike is giving you weird feedback from the rear, producing occasional death wobbles and just a generally uneasy feeling on a divided highway, should you A) ponder swingarm bearings?, B) consider whether your fairly new rear shock is in need of a servicing? Or C), pull over well ahead of sunset to check your tire pressure?

    C. The answer is C. Did I do that? Nope, I chose D, keep riding until...

    Finally the feedback becomes unbearable. The tire is as low as the sun is in the sky. We've got the tools and supplies and waning daylight. We sprang into roadside action with the whoosh, whoosh whoosh, whooooosh of cars speeding by at 110k, bike is on dirt, peg legged on a trail stand just off the paved shoulder near a guardrail. The steaming hot tube reveals improper installation caused a fold that eventually gave way to a slow, then less slow leak. Dick, who is much better at this stuff then I am, says, "I’m going to show you the right way to do this so it doesn’t happen again"…and in spite of all good intentions proceeds to pinch my spare tube. (Insert game show fail sound).

    But we’ve been training for this and we have a patch kit that thankfully has glue that is still good. We proceed accordingly, Dick carefully roughing, cleaning and patching the pinch holes on the new tube. By this time it’s dark dark and we're working by headlamp on the side of Autoroute 175. A tow truck driver pulls up and asks if we need help. We say we think we will be all set but he pulls up alongside us nonetheless with his noontime lumens and flashing yellow lights, vaping while parking protectively next to us for the remaining repair time, even letting us use his well-lit flatbed as a cleaner work surface. The patch worked, tire inflated, driver tipped accordingly for his kindness (he tried genuinely to refuse the Canadian plastic bills - "Non, J'insiste! C'était vraiment gentil d'arrêter icitte comme ca..." and he sheepishly relented).

    The bike got buttoned back up and off to the hotel that we were finally headed to...only to find that it's in fact a ski lodge that, even if it's open (doesn't look good), will be $$$. We don't even ask and just find a funky motel that's a few miles away, finally putting head to pillow around 10PM, 456 miles after we'd left camp that morning, no dinner in our stomachs. I caught up with the TV news, Radio Canada covering 9/11 commemorations and slept soundly until the next AM.
    IMG_9540.JPG ^Any port in a storm
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    #10
  11. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    Day 8, Stoneham-et-Tewkesbury, QC to Home, 297 miles

    We awake at the funky motel and walk for a decaf to the—surprise—closed dining room Tim Horton’s. After we walked through the drive-through we take a quick moto tour of Quebec city and then we jetted home via backroads through Beauce. I lived in this region as a young kid and think it’s one of the most beautiful places anywhere. There are rolling hills and fields and vistas in which you can connect one village to another by the silver steeples anchoring each one.
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    We eventually drive right by my childhood home, for me a good almost end to a great trip, 2,200 miles of fun that I would do over again someday… after my ass gets normal again.

    Now the tent is on the line back at home, I have a couple rear tubes on order and it’s back to normal life.

    Thanks to @The Sexy Medic for trip advice and his excellent ride report for the same route. My continued appreciation also goes to the people behind Gravel Travel, whom I just sent a few $ to support the site and in appreciation of this ride. I rode section 1 solo in 2019, spending about a week riding those amazing trails in Gaspe. This year I ventured further with good company along. I somehow doubt that I’ll ever get as far as Section 3 goes, but you never know…

    Day8.jpg
    #11
    jdub, ktjim, RedDogAlberta and 10 others like this.
  12. JRowland

    JRowland reaching for the sky Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2018
    Oddometer:
    4,611
    Location:
    Maggie Valley, NC
    Thanks for taking the time to write it! Pictures are awesome, I very much enjoyed it.
    #12
    Fishnbiker and boulet_boulet like this.
  13. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

    Joined:
    May 14, 2018
    Oddometer:
    2,126
    Location:
    Maine
    PS Here is the overview of the route I took. GPX tracks are available from www.graveltravel.ca

    Overview.jpg
    #13
    ktjim, Fishnbiker, AngusMcL and 2 others like this.
  14. flei

    flei cycletherapist

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2013
    Oddometer:
    12,462
    Location:
    Western Mass.
    Great ride. Would love to follow this route someday.
    #14
  15. Chet3215

    Chet3215 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2020
    Oddometer:
    34
    Location:
    USA
    Thanks for letting me join in. Looks like some beautiful ground you got to cover. This is one envious rider for sure.
    #15
    boulet_boulet likes this.
  16. joenuclear

    joenuclear Still here....

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    10,642
    Location:
    Arkansas near Oklahoma
    Thank you.
    #16
    boulet_boulet likes this.
  17. Klinc207

    Klinc207 To PERU!

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2015
    Oddometer:
    358
    Location:
    Up here or down there.
    Epic in my book! Hope to get that way in the Spring. Thank for the report!
    #17
  18. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

    Joined:
    May 14, 2018
    Oddometer:
    2,126
    Location:
    Maine
    It’s mostly 2-up friendly terrain too. I bet AR would love it and her French skills would come in handy.
    #18
    Klinc207 likes this.
  19. Vt-Stromer

    Vt-Stromer Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,574
    Location:
    Central Vt
    Nice job on this report!
    #19
    boulet_boulet likes this.
  20. Engie

    Engie n00b

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Oddometer:
    3
    Looks like an awesome trip Rich! Wish I could have done the whole trip with you but definitely enjoyed sharing the first day’s route. Maybe next year!
    #20