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2 Stroke touring?

Discussion in '2 smokers' started by Chillis, Jun 21, 2013.

  1. Blakebird

    Blakebird r - u - n - n - o - f - t

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Las Cruces, NM
    I took my first long trips out of town on my third bike, a '67 Suzuki TC250 (X6 Hustler), the TC250 was the scrambler version of the T20.
    One of the first six speeds around... six transfer ports, pretty peppy little mill.

    Wish I had pictures of it, but that was '71, in high school with a new driver's license, and a set of wheels to get lost on.

    Thankfully, pics are out there

    [​IMG]
    #61
  2. miguelR

    miguelR biker

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    Location:
    Montevideo-Uruguay-South America
    Jawa dos tiempos "touring", con 160.000 km (99.419 millas) recorridos por América del Sur, y aún funcionando
    Jawa two strokes "touring" with 160,000 km (99,419 miles) travels through South America, and still in use

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    #62
    BertieBassett likes this.
  3. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    A credit to you Miguel r . Simple basic two strokes last well, i think the high performance race and mx style two stroke engines although marvellous in their own way, have steered Adventure riders away from the two stroke camp to some extent.
    Yet in the eastern block and far east the basic simplicity of the two strokes were still appreciated and even with foresters hunters and farmers and the like butchering them in many cases they still seem to keep going in terrible conditions.
    #63
    BertieBassett likes this.
  4. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Hey Miguel, that is some pretty impressive bike! So how much maintenance has that required? And also what does that thing get for gas mileage?
    #64
  5. backofbeyond

    backofbeyond Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    20
    Pity there's no modern touring smokers (apart from Jawas!). I've been touring Europe on two strokes for decades and would definitely buy one. Here's a pic from the early 70's -


    [​IMG]

    Bike's a T350 Suzuki and we're two up and on our way from London to Rome.

    Next, a pic from the late 70's. The bike in the snow is a TS100 Suzuki and I'm on a 10 day 2000 mile winter trip to Salzburg, Austria along with someone on a DT125 Yamaha -

    [​IMG]



    Bringing things a bit more up to date, this one's from 2013 -

    [​IMG]


    Another 10 day winter trip, to Germany this time. The bike is a mid 70's Suzuki B120 that someone gave me as scrap about 3 months before the pic was taken. It's still running on its original chain, points and engine seals and didn't miss a beat for the 2000 flat out miles I did (mostly) on the autobahn. I was hoping for a bit more than 60mpg from a 125 but I don't suppose the "eBay special" windshield helped much. :D. Next up for it is a trip down through France to the Alps and back in a month or so.

    I have a friend in NJ who tours with his wife on a pair of his-n-hers early 70's YCS5 200cc Yamahas. This pic is from a campground in Georgia about 4 yrs ago -

    [​IMG]
    #65
  6. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    zi think some of the newer 2 strokes like the TDR 250s and the KTMs are well capable of the touring / adv off road riding deal.
    And if you go back a little further The dt/ it yamahas and the PE 400 suzuki are tough motorcycles simple light and capable.
    #66
  7. miguelR

    miguelR biker

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    Hey Miguel, that is some pretty impressive bike! So how much maintenance has that required? And also what does that thing get for gas mileage?

    Hello. maintenance is minimal and the yield of 15 kms per liter of petrol (35 miles per gallon by the converter)
    #67
  8. LasseNC

    LasseNC XSessive!

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    Denmark, Danimarka, Danmark, Dänemark
    [​IMG]

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    #68
  9. guzzirelic

    guzzirelic Been here awhile

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    near Espanola Ontario Canada
    #69
  10. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    Some interesting stories there guzzirelic i like the two strokes always have. :D
    #70
  11. Justav

    Justav MasterLurker

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    Mine was a blue one, too, '79 RD200DX. And pretty used to touring, all back in the mid-80's. One trip took me all the way across the Alps into Jugoslavia, more specifically to Istria and back, while another one took me 3 weeks all across France. Both with full camping gear, and only the rather generic luggage options I could afford back then. The range was a limitation (I remember 150km's to reserve, 9l, as good mileage), and the max speed was also barely adequate for freeway situations, even though back then it didn't keep me from pushing the limits frequently. On any back roads, it was a happy bike, and got me quite far with only a modest amount of patience on uphill sections, or if the wind didn't came from the wrong direction.

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    Leaving for my Tour de France '86

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    Somewhere in the middle of nowhere in the Cevennes region in France

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    Leaving towards Jugoslavia in '84. The RD was faster -- by a lot :D

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    Crossing the Grossglockner road in Austria on the return from Yugoslavia

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    Another shot from the return through the mountains



    Great memories, sold it in late '86 for the fastest 500 street single available at that time.:ricky

    - J
    #71
  12. guzzirelic

    guzzirelic Been here awhile

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    Leaving towards Jugoslavia in '84. The RD was faster -- by a lot :D

    [​IMG]



    Great stories!
    Is that a Heinkel Tourist?

    Relic
    #72
  13. Justav

    Justav MasterLurker

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    Yes, indeed a Heinkel Tourist, don't remember the vintage, but it was a lot older than my RD. This was a very interesting combo -- on the steepest mountain passes, the Heinkel could only manage in 1st gear. I couldn't keep pace with it -- in first, the RD was revving uncomfortably high and was too twitchy, and in 2nd, it didn't have enough torque to maintain the slow speed. It needed to go faster than the Heinkel could manage, and use the 2nd. You learn to live with these peculiarities rather quickly. Other than that, the more modest top speed of the Heinkel kept the fuel efficiency of my RD manageable on most other segments, at least to some degree. A fun trip indeed.
    If you want to travel, you really don't need a big bike. Even though here in the US, the limited range would be of concern, unlike anywhere I went with it in Europe.

    - J
    #73
  14. guzzirelic

    guzzirelic Been here awhile

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    I learned about the Heinkel Tourist when I read "I see by my outfit" a true story novel by Peter Beagle. Its about a couple of fellows who travel on a pair of Tourists in the 1960's. (or was it the 70's? My memory fails me...)
    Good book. I like the sort of "art deco" styling of the Tourist.
    Part of their advertising touted the advantages of a four stroke scooter over the more popular two strokes, (of course aimed at Vespa and Lambretta).
    As you mention, range is a factor more and more these days as gas stations close up in small towns. Here in Northern Ontario you had better be able to cover a couple hundred kilometers or you'll be pushing!

    Relic
    #74
  15. CR500

    CR500 morning coffee and advrider.

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    Apple Valley Minnesota
    I just got my CR500 plate for use on the streets, I like it so far. I will have to see how it does. adventures ahead.
    #75
  16. conchscooter

    conchscooter Long timer

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    I apologize for bringing a scooter into the thread but it is a two stroke. Available with pre mix, tons of farkles and ample spare parts. When properly set up it is ultra low maintenance and easy to use. Carries a spare wheel, lots of luggage rack capacity, top speed stock 63 mph and able to ride in high heat thanks to forced ventilation. 8 ounces of 30 weight oil every 2,000 miles in the gearbox is the only scheduled maintenance. These bikes are still built in 150/125cc versions and have been ridden round the world and on the Dakar etc. and they are 12 hp four speed two strokes.
    A Suzuki 500 Titan would be fabulous but a P200 is surprisingly practical if you are less than 6 feet tall.
    Stergios Gogos of Greece is in Sourh America after crossing Africa on his 200 with 130,000 MILES on the clock. Mine is rather cleaner but is my low cost high fun commuter and will no doubt still be running long after I am planted.

    Attached Files:

    #76
  17. Phipsd

    Phipsd Older but not wiser.

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    My GT550 was just as comfortable as my GT750's, handled vastly better, used half as much oil and was quicker off the line with power right from idle. It was a wonderful highway bike.
    #77
  18. kapnk

    kapnk Been here awhile

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    Location:
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    I'm not sure where to put it, but I have a question about long distance on 2 strokes.

    How much oil should I bring?

    I'm planning a trip that's about 700 miles and trying to figure out how much oil to bring.

    Bike details: 1981 KE175 with oil injection.
    Route: first half will be forest service roads and ATV trails, second half will be county roads (55 mph)

    I've put 2350 miles on the bike, but I've failed to keep track of the oil consumption. Gas mileage has averaged 55 mpg. MPQ (miles per quart of oil) = dunno??? I just top up the tank when I think of it, and it's always been 1/2 full or thereabouts when I top it up.

    There are 3 ways I've tried to come up with a number:
    (1) Fill ups
    I'd say I've put in 1 qt of oil for every 2 tanks of gas. Less if anything. Going on that, 1 qt for every 110 miles.
    => bring 7 quarts (ugh!)

    (2) bottles used
    I know for sure I've put 7 bottles of oil in. Past that, not sure. 2350 miles / 7 qts = 336 miles/qt.
    => bring 2 quarts

    (3) oil pump rate
    manual says 5.0-6.0 cc's for every 3 minutes at 2000 RPM when pulling lever to deliver maximum volume.
    A chart in the manual says 55 mph = 6000 rpm (approx) in 5th gear. Let's assume I go 55 mph for the whole trip, without stopping or shifting gears.
    Perhaps we assume it's a linear conversion from 2000 to 6000 rpm
    6cc/3min at 2000 rpm = 18 cc / 3 min @ 6000 rpm
    Or to express this in cc/min: 6cc/min
    Now the consumption rate with respect to time at a fixed engine speed is known. Now just need to calculate time.
    700 mi x (1 hr / 55 mi) x (60 min/1 hr) = 764 min of running (remember, 55 mph, nonstop)
    Finally, an easy calculation to get # of quarts:
    764 min * (6 cc / 1 min) * (1 qt / 946 cc) = 4.9 qts
    => bring 5 quarts

    Yes, I could buy oil along the way, but I have a preferred brand (Citgo Supergard for air cooled engines) which isn't available everywhere.

    Based on these different methods, I'm thinking of leaving with a full tank and bringing 4 quarts, and buying some along the way.

    So anyone else have practical experience on a trip like this?

    Thanks in advance!

    Kapnk
    #78
  19. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Buy 4qts of oil. Bring 2qts and leave the other two with someone who can ship them to you. My guess is that you won't even use 2 on the whole trip.
    #79
  20. ihatemybike

    ihatemybike Been here awhile

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    Having done several similar rides on my KE100, bring an emergency quart you. I use a couple easy to stash pint bottles for my emergency supply.

    Normal refilling, pick up what you need along the way. Most gas stations carry two stroke oil and our old bikes run better on the cheap non-synthetic stuff.
    #80