2 types of riders.

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Mosher, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. Mosher

    Mosher Adventurer

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    March 6th. wasn’t a good night for me. I’m alive and was sore for over a week. Happy that my riding gear did its job and even happier I was wearing most of it.

    For anyone who’s interested in what happened keep reading.

    Im not a writer but I’ll start by describing what I think happened.

    I fell through a black hole and made it out in 1 one piece. Mad Maxine (2001, R1200GS Triple black), not so much.....

    According the the state patrolman I slid 205’ (60 yards) on the pavement before coming to a stop in the ditch confused about what/how everything just happened. My 90 minute commute ended about 38 minutes after it began. It was around 10:30pm, foggy with lots of deer. Being aware of unfavorable riding conditions. I was, what I thought, more than alert that evening. I was in the left lane Heading out of town on a 2 lane state highway. I was traveling 60-ish mph. I went to switch lanes from the left to the right on a freshly paved blacktop road with what appeared to be complete new bright lines painted and was a nice road to travel.

    I put my signal on (there weren’t any lights behind me for a while) I looked over my right should to double check that no one was in my blind spot. When I looked forward all I saw was sparks spinning fireworks . I hit the ground and was aware that something had gone wrong. Everything slowed down for me and I remember most of the wild ride. I knew I was no longer upright or on my motorcycle and sliding down the road for what seemed like FOREVER... bumpiest. ride. ever......

    I came to rest 1/2 on my face and on my right shoulder with my butt sticking up in the air. My visor (rarely ride with it closed) had been torn off at some point. My communication system was found I’m the woods by the state patrolman.

    I did get up momentarily and saw my motorcycle upside down and cars in the grass and in the median. I laid back down once I realized I wasn’t in the middle of the road awaiting a car to smoosh me. Two people came running over to me. I thought I possibly hit an animal or something (Twas dark out) The woman said she saw me go down. She said that the different heights of the new, uneven lanes was hard to manage in a car. At night, with new blacktop, and bright lane markings, I hadn’t even realized there were uneven lanes. It looked flat to me and there were no immediate signs of incomplete road work.

    The firefighters were the first of many flashing lights to arrive. A firefighter came up to me and ran me through a list of questions. The ambulance showed up shortly after and I was told to go let them check me out. All were super nice people. I drank and bottle of water and probably said whatever was on my mind (there was a lot going through my head). I thought I was dreaming “wow for what I think just went through, I thought it would hurt more.” I wasn’t sure the extent of my crash until other emergency workers started opening doors prepared to view the worst, and were surprised to see me talking.

    The firefighter asked me how I felt. My first feelings was embarrassment for sure. Some of my gear has over 100k miles on it, it’s been worn on 3-4 different motorcycles over the years and has been cross country and everywhere past where most people ride. I now feel very lucky to be alive. My protective gear saved my hide and probably my life.

    I’m sharing this experience with all of the people who care to know.

    RIDERS & PASSENGERS
    When I left work I was wearing $2,600+ worth of protective motorcycle gear. Buy and wear that shit it WILL keep you alive and don’t think that name brand gear is safer.

    Helmet = Shoei Multitec modular helmet with Sean SMH10 comm unit

    Leatt neck brace = https://www.leatt.com/shop/moto/neck-braces/stx-road-888.html

    Aerostich made in America roadcrafter classic goretex suit. All armor in suit except hip pads.
    https://www.aerostich.com/suits/two...men-s-roadcrafter-classic-two-piece-suit.html

    Aerostich elk skin roper gloves
    https://www.aerostich.com/aerostich-competition-elkskin-ropers.html

    Vans sneakers = my legs would have done better with Sidi boots.

    Fuck how “cool” you look while riding a motorcycle. Budget, wear, understand why and how proper protective gear is designed to fail in the event you dismount your motorcycle at any speed. Never let your guard down. Always look twice and execute your maneuver as if your life depends on it.

    Im on a ‘08 R1200RT. Where those “cool” folk hang out.

    FTW,
    Stevil Kenevil.

    Attached Files:

    #1
  2. ennui

    ennui audio and oil

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    Seconded. All the gear, all the time.

    Except pants. I haven't found one I've liked yet.

    Glad you are okay.
    #2
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  3. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    Damn, that sucks but the important thing is it sounds like you are okay. I destroyed a snell rated helmet last year myself. Luckily you didn't hit a fixed object or another vehicle or the story would be much worse. As far as I can tell gear only protects you from abrasion from sliding on the road and the initial helmet smackdown.
    #3
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  4. Motonirvana

    Motonirvana Can't make this shit up

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    Glad you were dressed for the slide and walked away without major injury. I'm guessing the Roadcrafter is toast and you will be getting another 'Stich?
    #4
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  5. neanderthal

    neanderthal globeriding wannabe

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    Here, but lost. Am I lost if i know i'm here?
    Glad you're here to tell the tale. Get well soon.
    #5
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  6. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    At least get the kevlar motorcycle jeans. They already "saved my ass" once. Because without them you are not AGATT. I am upgrading this year to a neck brace and riding pants with armor.


    Mosher

    My great grandfather was a Dubose, and the family is one of the founders of Charleston. It feels like home to me when I'm down there. Last time I stayed on Wadmala Island and I rode my V-Strom way too fast. So I feel like I am saying this to a friend- I think a 90 minute commute on a motorcycle in the dark is a lot of risk, cumulatively. Deer , potholes, road kill, maniac drivers, etc. Too much risk. We are all riding around hoping our luck holds, but that is pushing it. Bravo on the gear. OK, lecture over.
    #6
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  7. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    Up to you, but you may well have a case against the state and or road crew. Conditions like that are supposed to be marked, to keep things like this to a minimum. If it wasn't marked, you may well have a legal case against them for it.

    That said, go back as the rider and figure out why you didn't see this, and how you could have better handled it. Learn from it and improve your riding skills. That's not a cheap shot, it's a very general thing, and something especially practiced in aviation. You crashed, how could you have prevented it, and how can you improve your riding skills to prevent it in the future?
    #7
  8. Mosher

    Mosher Adventurer

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    I have no reason to look anywhere but Aerostich.

    I think the most important thing to consider is how easy the gear goes on and comes off. If it’s a pain in the butt or takes a long time to put on you’re less likely to wear it.
    #8
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  9. Mosher

    Mosher Adventurer

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    I don’t think size of wheel would have made a difference. I’m not a seasonal rider and have encountered that condition many of times, never by surprise. The deviation between lanes was excessive according to the state patrolman. He said any bike out that night would have resulted in the same crash. Glad I had all my gear on. The motorcycle I was on had 78,113 miles.
    #9
  10. Mosher

    Mosher Adventurer

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    That’s exactly what I said. Luck played a part in that I didn’t hit any guardrail, no signs and not cars ran me over during the chaos.

    Sorry to hear about your spill. Glad you came out of it well also.
    #10
  11. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Glad you made it through without any serious damage.
    Riding at night does increase risk a lot, I used to do a lot of it when younger, not so much now.
    Rail road tracks are another fun thing when they don't cross at right angles, some in the city run in the same direction as the road, in the road, real fun when wet I imagine!
    #11
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  12. ennui

    ennui audio and oil

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    I
    Hmm, I like their one piece suit. Seems like it would be pure torture though during the Texas summers.
    #12
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  13. NoVa Rider

    NoVa Rider Long timer Supporter

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    Edge trap. I talk about it in my MSF classes -- used to be in the curriculum but isn't specifically mentioned now. The tire isn't tall enough and the wheel scrapes, like riding a bicycle alongside a curb and trying to ease over, just won't work. Immediate drop.

    Maryland used to post signs. Most I see now are "uneven lanes." A warning, but not as specific as it could be to warn riders. . ..:(

    Glad you came out relatively ok. :thumb
    #13
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  14. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    Too that point, Mosher stated in the OP that it was unfavorable or dangerous conditions and he was hyper alert. That alone can be a cause. I've made cognitive mistakes riding in that state. I get so tense and hyped up that I miss something obvious. That is why you hear older riders saying things like they felt something was wrong and they just went home. Had Mosher been riding in favorable conditions and not " extra alert" for deer etc he probably might have seen the difference in lane height. Certainly daylight would have shown it.

    As an example; once I was riding in rush our morning traffic going to work. I was being super vigilant riding about 55 mph on a 4 lane. I noticed this ass hat in a jacked up jeep next to me. The guy had the top off and he was reclined all the way back texting with both hands and steering with his knees. I got so outraged by that and when I looked forward - there was another idiot dead stopped in my lane 100 feet ahead of me. I almost ran right into him.

    Hyper alert doesn't work. Its like a pilot getting overloaded and he gets tunnel vision and he can't see the mistakes he is making.
    #14
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  15. Little Bike

    Little Bike Air/Clutz Sue Supporter

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    I’m not a litigious person, but having an officer telling you that was an extreme change between lanes and any bike would have gone down in those conditions would be enough to make me go after your state road people. If nothing else they’ll fix it so this doesn’t happen to anyone else.

    Glad you’re ok.
    #15
  16. IronButt70

    IronButt70 You don't have to be crazy to do this but it helps

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    Glad you weren’t seriously hurt. Sounds like quite the spill. I just got my ride back after sideswiping a van at 55 mph that pulled out into my lane. Another strong vote for ATGATT. My armored pants shaved me from a probable serious knee/leg injury when the engine guard was smashed into it. All I suffered was a fractured patella. $11k damage to the bike, the van had to get towed and I walked away.
    Heal quick and get out in the wind ASAP.
    #16
  17. Friz Freleng

    Friz Freleng Religious zealot Supporter

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    You should request a copy of the patrolman's accident report because your insurance company will likely conclude that you simply lost control and are to blame you for the accident, triggering the usual insurance hell. Hopefully, the officer will have noted the excessively uneven pavement in his report, which you can then use to rebut your insurer's conclusion.
    #17
  18. Friz Freleng

    Friz Freleng Religious zealot Supporter

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    I read somewhere that lower body injuries are more common than chest and arm injuries. I wear a pair of Forcefield armored pants under a pair of stout leather pants. The thing I like about the Forcefield pants is that the armor stays exactly where it's supposed to be. Whenever I tried Klim or BMW or other looser fitting pants, the armor would always shift.

    https://www.forcefieldbodyarmour.com/armoured-clothing
    #18
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  19. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

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    ...these things.

    When the agent of the state tells you it was dangerous/hazardous, but there was no sign warning anyone in advance, I think it (the state) has some liability, which they will say was the contractor doing the paving, who will say it was the guy driving the paver, etc... but your fight will be with your insurance. Protect yourself.
    #19
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  20. Rider2

    Rider2 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I'm glad to hear things turned out well for the OP. Not ideal, to be sure, but alive, uninjured, and back on a bike.

    Hyper alert (for deer) means running the risk of not seeing things that AREN'T deer - like signs that say "uneven road surface" or "motorcyclists use caution". Not saying this happened to the OP but it's certainly something that could happen to me.

    I had a bad experience in the dark, in the fog - rearended, hit/run, bike totaled, hospital for me, 6 weeks out of work. I don't do that any more.

    Yes a 'Stich in Texas, in the summer, is hot. I sip from a camelback to hydrate at the same rate I sweat, otherwise I'm trapped in a stop to drink/stop to pee cycle and I prefer to ride tank to tank if I can. Iron Butt Association had a lengthy article with interesting thoughts on keeping cool in hot weather.
    #20