2004 R1150RT Wideband O2 Sensor Project (and AF-XIED for BMW)

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by roger 04 rt, Dec 13, 2011.

  1. SeeRace

    SeeRace Been here awhile

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    Here are some pics of my install today on my 2012 GSA. There is a cover below the valve cover with (3) bolts. Take that off to access the O2 sensor. I tie wrapped the new AF-XIED to the existing. It is tight but will fit in there below the cover. This is left side.

    [​IMG]
  2. SeeRace

    SeeRace Been here awhile

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    Right side. A little more tight with the drain located there.
    [​IMG]
  3. BronsonRock

    BronsonRock Banned

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    Thanks for posting those pics. So...you were able to get that plastic connection cover off w/o removing the stock magnesium valve cover protection? Just from a quick look it appeared like it would be too tight to access at least one of the bolts holding it in place. That is good news indeed if I have less to pull off and then put back on! :clap
  4. SeeRace

    SeeRace Been here awhile

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    I put my controllers vertically attached to the air box with velcro. There was not enough harness to reach the tool tray and I already have a fuzeblock there anyway. I ended up grounding to the negative on the battery. Could not find a better ground on the frame. As you can see I removed the fuel tank. Did not have to but had about 5 lbs of Dalton and Denali Hwy under there and wanted to clean it up.

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  5. SeeRace

    SeeRace Been here awhile

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    I have Machine Art Moto covers on my valve covers. Did not have to touch them. The lower cover is separate with (3) 30 torx fasteners.
  6. SeeRace

    SeeRace Been here awhile

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    The install did not take more than 1-1/2 hours. Would have been shorter but I had some "help"
    [​IMG]

    I do have a question. Looking at my install, If I have my AF display module mounted vertically as you can see, would #7 setting be at 2:00 oclock? I am not getting a consistent blink of the yellow light indicator after startup so want to make sure of the setting before riding.
  7. pklop

    pklop Motorcycle addict

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    [/QUOTE]

    Roger, just a note; on my wethead the red and yellow light come on immediately after turning the key on (without starting the engine) and after a few moments the yellow led starts to blink to indicate the setting it is on. I then just count the number of flashes and those do indeed correspond with the dial.

    I guess the wethead is supplying power to the sensor with ignition on, while the oilhead is only supplying power with the engine on.

    Great picture with the dog :D
    Peter
  8. SeeRace

    SeeRace Been here awhile

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    Just for clarity in your horizontal position the red light is to the left and the green and yellow lights are on the right correct? Thanks for the help.
  9. roger 04 rt

    roger 04 rt Long timer

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    Thanks for the follow-up questions and pklop, for the Wethead key-on clarification.

    Here is the correct orientation which I got wrong and have since deleted the post.

    --On some models, the lights come on at key on, but the flashing of the yellow LED to signal a count of the setting doesn't begin until a moment after the bike starts on others the flashing begins with key on. You have to watch closely.

    --The AF-XIED setting dial is tiny but accurate. I use reading glasses normally but really need a magnifying glass to see all the detail on the dial. The adjustment slot has a tiny arrowhead. If you hold the unit vertically so that the RED LED is up, 12 o'clock is the tiny hash mark that is straight up. Put the arrowhead on that line and you get setting 6. The total range of motion is from 7 o'clock (11 flashes) through 5 o'clock (1 flash).

    One tiny hash mark to the left (11 o'clock) is setting 7, and one more to the left is setting 8.
  10. BronsonRock

    BronsonRock Banned

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    Does it come from the factory always set at a certain position? If so, which one? I seem to recall you suggesting to start at one setting and then try the others after a couple of tanks of fuel? Should every user go through this process and is it just subjective, seat of the pants, senses that we are trying to improve?
  11. roger 04 rt

    roger 04 rt Long timer

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    It comes from the factory set in 7. That is about 4% enrichment and removes most drivability issues--surging, stumbling, touchy throttle. Setting 8 is about 6% richer and adds a bit more low end torque--enough that most can feel it.

    If you have an r1100, whose heater is always on and which has an older thimble-style sensor, or on any bike if you've modified the exhaust and are getting air reversion, 6 might be the same enrichment as 7 is on most bikes.

    Therefore starting at 7 and running several tanks of gas, then trying 6 and 8 for similar periods should yield the most satisfying results. After 2 years of trying richer and leaner many times I've personally settled on setting 8 (LC-1 set at 0.94).
  12. SeeRace

    SeeRace Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the clarification Roger. On my 2012 camhead the yellow lights blink with the key on before startup and confirmed the correct setting on the AFR display. Now to go ride and burn up some fuel :evil
  13. terryckdbf

    terryckdbf Bumbling BackRoad Riders™

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    Although the O2 connectors are in the exact same place you are correct Bronson, there is a cover that is required to be removed to gain access to them. In order to remove that cover I removed my cylinder head protectors. Three screws for the head cover, three for the O2 cover.

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    I removed my head protector to get at this screw.

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    Sorry for the confusion, I've been working mostly with the GS.

    I don't know anything about your type of protectors.

    Terry.
  14. BronsonRock

    BronsonRock Banned

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    Thanks Terry. That is perfectly documented and exactly what I was referring to. That one screw in particular isn't accessible w/o first removing the head protector. I guess SeeRace's aftermarket head protection made things easier for him but with the OEM covers at least they (and the O2 sensor cover) must be removed and then replaced.
  15. roger 04 rt

    roger 04 rt Long timer

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    Here is a close up photo of the AF-XIED, courtesy of Terry, that I've marked up to make the settings clearer. Get the point of the arrowhead to exactly line up with the mark on the dial and you've got the settings.

    6~14.4:1 (lambda~0.98)
    7~14.1:1 (lambda~0.96)
    8~13.8:1 (lambda~0.94)

    These AFRs are slightly different for different motorcycles, O2 sensors and exhaust configurations. Use them as a starting point but find the setting that works best for your bike, somewhere between 5 and 9.

    [​IMG]
  16. BronsonRock

    BronsonRock Banned

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    Thanks Roger. That makes things easy! :clap
  17. xfmr

    xfmr n00b

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    Thanks for the help guys, got it installed today.
  18. SeeRace

    SeeRace Been here awhile

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    I rode 140 miles yesterday on setting 7. Bike is running better than ever and as others have said much improved running at low rpms. Bike pulls harder all the way through redline now. Looking forward to a few hundred miles then switching to setting #8 to see if it improves further, but happy how it is running now.

    Dave
  19. roger 04 rt

    roger 04 rt Long timer

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    R1100, R1150 and R1200 Alpha-N Fueling and the Dyno: Post #6

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    In Posts #3, 4 and 5 we've seen a Dyno chart, and the leanness & low engine loads cause by the Inertial Dyno method. The chart above demonstrates a few more differences between an Inertial Dyno test and On-Road riding. The RED bars are rear-wheel acceration on the Dynamometer during the test run. The BLUE bars are rear-wheel acceleration on a level road, no wind, in 4th gear, the same as the Dyno test. The data presented here was taken by a GS-911 connected to an R1200GS during Inertial Dyno tests on an R1200GS. The Closed Loop AFR preceeding the test had been at approximately 13.8:1 in both cases with time for full Mixture Adaptation. Barometric pressure and Air Temperature were similar and close enough for these purposes.

    --The first thing to look at is that the Dyno reaches a rate of acceleration at the rear wheel of 24 fpss (feet per second per second). On the road, under the same conditions the acceleration is about 12 fpss. The Dyno test is like accelerating a bike that is about half the weight of an R1200GS.

    --Due to the leanness caused by deceleration (the red bars pointing downward), the Dyno doesn't reach full fueling and acceleration until 4800 RPM. On-road reaches full acceleration at 3000 RPM because on the road, the engine is fueling to overcome the air and rolling resistances of traveling 20-25 mph and therefore in Closed Loop at 13.8:1.

    --Looking at the Dyno results, you can see that on the Dyno the rear-wheel acceleration stays fairly flat to 7900 RPM. This is because the resistance of the Dyno is constant at all times--the inertia of the roller. On the road, as the bike accelerates, more of the HP of the engine is used to overcome air resistance and as a result the HP left over for acceleration goes down--above 75-80 mph, it goes down quite quickly. At 6700 RPM, while the rear-wheel keeps accelerating at a high rate on the Dyno, the on-road acceleration has dropped from about 12 fpss at 5500 RPM to about 8 fpss at 6700. On the road, the engine does more work than on the Dyno at high RPMs.

    The chart at the bottom of the page is the same acceleration information but equalized to 100% of the Dyno's top acceleration for the Dyno data and to 100% of On-Road's top acceleration for the On-Road data. This means both sets of data reach 100%, making them easier to compare. I've added this chart because it becomes very obvious how much better an On-Road test is at finding low-RPM torque and horsepower and also how much added load the bike experiences at high speeds due to air resistance.

    --At 1950 RPM, on-road acceleration is 80% of peak acceleration. By comparison, due to leanness preceeding the measurements, the Dyno test shows only 30% of its eventual peak. From the beginning, through 4000 RPM the Dyno is underreporting the bikes true torque.

    --Notice too that at 1700 RPM on-road

    My next chart will show rate of acceleration for the test interval by comparing four Dyno runs on an R1200GS at 14.7:1 versus four runs at 13.8:1. All runs were on the same bike and same Dyno.
    RB

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  20. durobra

    durobra Nudista

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