2004 R1150RT Wideband O2 Sensor Project (and AF-XIED for BMW)

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by roger 04 rt, Dec 13, 2011.

  1. GroceryRun

    GroceryRun Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 4, 2010
    Oddometer:
    240
    Location:
    Central NJ , USA
    Acquired bike in 2007 and have always gotten a constant 33 MPG.

    Bike is 2004 R1100S. I believe the bike is stock except maybe the muffler has been opened up a bit - not really sure because the bike is still pretty quiet. Cat is still there (baby does that thing stay hot for a long time after a ride ).
    Done the timing, valves and spark plugs a few times.
    I've replaced fuel filter and air filter.
    I've replaced all the sensors - air, oil, Hall , O2.
    I reset the Motronics every time electrical work is done - ie. change of battery, change of starter......

    The last thing I changed was the O2 sensor. Since the O2 change I might be getting 35 MPG but that might be because I've been filling the tank to a higher lever and it's corrupting my MPG calculation.

    Question - If the Motronics learns and creates an adoption table , would powering off the Motronics erase this adoption table or does the adoption table only get erased with the use of a GS-911 ?
  2. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,482
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Roger--

    I Googled that sensor and at Autozone came up with this pic--

    [​IMG]

    Is it this easy to replace the O2 sensor? No cutting and soldering?
  3. WillieJ

    WillieJ MotorMan

    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
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    228
    Location:
    Bellingham, WA
  4. roger 04 rt

    roger 04 rt Long timer

    Joined:
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    3,437
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Drone, On an R1150xx or R1100S Single-SPark, this is a good sensor. Plug ' Play, no cutting, no soldering (not allowed on narrowband O2 sensors anyhow).

    Pull the tank, pay attention to the wire routing, maybe drop the exhaust, not sure. Sometimes a special O2 sensor socket to break it free. Reinstall with supplied antiseize, torque, plug in.
  5. roger 04 rt

    roger 04 rt Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,437
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    The specs for a stock R1100S say 45 mpg at 75 and over 50 at 55 mpg so you're way off what you should get. A guy over at bmwmoa had a front brake caliper dragging creating a problem like yours but it was on an RT. Just saying there are lots of possible causes.

    You spent a good bit of money replacing sensors. If you had access to a GS-911 we could tell if the fueling system was working properly pretty quickly. You'd need to start a thread somewhere on this. Sometimes the mods let non-GS threads live in GSBoxers and sometimes they bounce them. Do you post on bmwmoa or bmwsporttouring?

    If you get to the root cause of your problem, you should get low 40s at least.

    When you disconnect the battery or fuse 5 for 10 minutes, the Adaptation Values table gets erased. That won't cause the low mileage though.
  6. phlazm

    phlazm ad maiora nati sumus

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2014
    Oddometer:
    93
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    To clarify, I have an 1100 that doesn't have the nice clips that just plug in, I had to tap into the lines and cut some wires. The parts with the kit were very high quality and I was impressed they didn't cut corners, but to be safe I electric taped the crap out of those. The video with showing the circuit in the water was nice to see, I guess I was just spooked by seeing the warranty was only for 30 days.

    Overall I am incredibly impressed with the results.

  7. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    86,675
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    First, I apologize to Roger. He gave me a unit to test many months ago, and only recently did I get it installed. I have only a few short commuting trips since install, but I plan more later and longer.

    The install took about half an hour. Very simple. The units I installed were well used, as others have tested them as well, so ignore that they are not new, and my bike is pretty dirty due in part to 126K miles on it, and in part to I ride it in all weather.

    I'll give my preliminary results now, and add to them later when I get more miles.

    I am typically a doubter when it comes to fuel control, after market performance enhancement etc. so I was not really expecting any real difference. Call me a healthy skeptic.:deal

    The units are very simple to install, with just removing the seat and the two small plastic side panels.

    After install I started the bike fairly cold. It started normally, but within a couple seconds it smoothed out nicely, noticeably smoother than normal.

    On my 3 short 7 mile commuting mornings, temps in the high 60's and humid, the bike seemed to perform normally. Nothing particularly noticeable in difference.

    The afternoon commute of the same distance home I did notice that the bike seemed a bit smoother. Kind of opposite what I would have guessed.

    Transitions on/off the throttle felt a little smoother, but in heavy DC traffic I have not really given it much of a chance.

    I need to get out into the twisties and in some low speed technical stuff to get a feel for real throttle response as what I am feeling now might be tainted by expectations.

    Overall the bike feels a little smoother, especially at idle, and maybe a little more smooth on/off throttle, but I need more miles.

    Now, on to the install:

    As I said, very simple, clean and easy.

    [​IMG]
    The O2 sensor connector is between the exhaust and the bottom of cylinder right behind the lower spark plug cover.

    [​IMG]
    Use a small flat blade screwdriver and gently lift the tab just high enough to pull the plug apart.

    [​IMG]
    Pull gently as to not stress the plug. It is tough, but can be brittle.

    [​IMG]
    The unit plug next to the factory plug. They are identical.

    [​IMG]
    Plug the matching ends to the unit and the factory wiring.

    [​IMG]
    It is impossible to get it wrong.

    [​IMG]
    Here you can see the unit waiting to be tied into place.

    [​IMG]
    Trim off the Zip Ties.

    [​IMG]
    Fit new zip ties into the slots.

    [​IMG]
    Zip tie it into place, then add one more to hold all the wiring snug.

    I am doing this as a temporary install since I need to return it when I am done, so it won't be as neat as it would be if going permanent.

    [​IMG]
    Do the other side the same way.

    [​IMG]
    Find a good ground. Many use the battery, but there is an unused frame bracket on the right side under the side cover that worked perfectly.

    [​IMG]
    I chose to put them in my tool tray since I will be messing with them for the best settings.

    [​IMG]
    The setting as received was at 8. Some use 7 and some 8. I just left them as is for now.

    So, as you can see, easy install, takes no time at all.

    I will check back in over the next few weeks when I get some miles on the set-up.
  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    86,675
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    Posted in G-spot:

    First, I apologize to Roger. He gave me a unit to test many months ago, and only recently did I get it installed. I have only a few short commuting trips since install, but I plan more later and longer.

    The install took about half an hour. Very simple. The units I installed were well used, as others have tested them as well, so ignore that they are not new, and my bike is pretty dirty due in part to 126K miles on it, and in part to I ride it in all weather.

    I'll give my preliminary results now, and add to them later when I get more miles.

    I am typically a doubter when it comes to fuel control, after market performance enhancement etc. so I was not really expecting any real difference. Call me a healthy skeptic.:deal

    The units are very simple to install, with just removing the seat and the two small plastic side panels.

    After install I started the bike fairly cold. It started normally, but within a couple seconds it smoothed out nicely, noticeably smoother than normal.

    On my 3 short 7 mile commuting mornings, temps in the high 60's and humid, the bike seemed to perform normally. Nothing particularly noticeable in difference.

    The afternoon commute of the same distance home I did notice that the bike seemed a bit smoother. Kind of opposite what I would have guessed.

    Transitions on/off the throttle felt a little smoother, but in heavy DC traffic I have not really given it much of a chance.

    I need to get out into the twisties and in some low speed technical stuff to get a feel for real throttle response as what I am feeling now might be tainted by expectations.

    Overall the bike feels a little smoother, especially at idle, and maybe a little more smooth on/off throttle, but I need more miles.

    Now, on to the install:

    As I said, very simple, clean and easy.

    [​IMG]
    The O2 sensor connector is between the exhaust and the bottom of cylinder right behind the lower spark plug cover.

    [​IMG]
    Use a small flat blade screwdriver and gently lift the tab just high enough to pull the plug apart.

    [​IMG]
    Pull gently as to not stress the plug. It is tough, but can be brittle.

    [​IMG]
    The unit plug next to the factory plug. They are identical.

    [​IMG]
    Plug the matching ends to the unit and the factory wiring.

    [​IMG]
    It is impossible to get it wrong.

    [​IMG]
    Here you can see the unit waiting to be tied into place.

    [​IMG]
    Trim off the Zip Ties.

    [​IMG]
    Fit new zip ties into the slots.

    [​IMG]
    Zip tie it into place, then add one more to hold all the wiring snug.

    I am doing this as a temporary install since I need to return it when I am done, so it won't be as neat as it would be if going permanent.

    [​IMG]
    Do the other side the same way.

    [​IMG]
    Find a good ground. Many use the battery, but there is an unused frame bracket on the right side under the side cover that worked perfectly.

    [​IMG]
    I chose to put them in my tool tray since I will be messing with them for the best settings.

    [​IMG]
    The setting as received was at 8. Some use 7 and some 8. I just left them as is for now.

    So, as you can see, easy install, takes no time at all.

    I will check back in over the next few weeks when I get some miles on the set-up.
  9. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    86,675
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    By the way, I do not get any form of compensation for this. I am returning the unit when done. I am doing this just for my own curiosity, so no obligation to give a good review.
  10. wafish

    wafish Crashy VonBrokenbits

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    180
    Location:
    Seattle
    Thanks Jim - look forward to hearing your thoughts on these.
  11. 65SlashTwo

    65SlashTwo Da Pigu Supporter

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    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
  12. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

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    14,290
    Location:
    The woods and mountains of Alabama
    If I am any judge, JVB will be impressed after he has some seat time and has played with the various settings.

    :lurk
  13. roger 04 rt

    roger 04 rt Long timer

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    Massachusetts
    I sent him the units on setting 8. Try 7 and compare. Looks like a good choice of ground.

    Thanks Jim for the good installation diagrams. Many will be appreciative. Enjoy the riding.
  14. boney

    boney Ride > Post Supporter

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    Oct 19, 2004
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    Sonoma CA
  15. liviob

    liviob Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Oddometer:
    702
    Location:
    Denver, Co.
    I have been able to put more miles on my bike using setting "5" and discovered that my bike will ping wildly on a 70F day using 3/4 to full throttle. I am using Shell 91 octane fuel. The engine does not ping around town or at highway speeds while using smaller throttle settings. Also the engine produces more than enough torque and 38.2mpg while using "5".

    I have set the A/F-XIED to setting "6" and while less pinging occurs under the same circumstances the engine still pings a lot. Some might say don't turn the throttle 3/4 to wide open and no more pinging will occur, but in my mind the engine should not ping at all on high octane fuel at 5600' altitude. Due to the altitude my engine is making much less compression than it would at sea level.

    I have a few questions.

    1) Is the pinging at larger throttle settings occurring because the motronic has not learned to add enough fuel at these settings since i don't normally ride the bike like this?

    2) Is the motronic adding enough fuel, but the ignition is advancing to far? I will check the ignition timing to see where it is set. If it is advanced or even set to the stock setting will retarding the HES plate actually retard the ignition spark? or will the motronic cancel out where i set it?

    The way BMW has tuned this engine i would probably need to run 95 or higher octane fuel to stop the pinging this setup produces. "Facepalm"
  16. Wallowa

    Wallowa Diver Down

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    Nov 30, 2006
    Oddometer:
    6,094
    Location:
    NE Oregon
    I think the octane issue is a distraction; your bike should run on regular ...turn it to "7" [recommended by AF-XiED folks] for a richer mixture and less pre-ignition...I would up the F/A until the pinging stopped...

    But as always I could be wrong....:D

    Phil
  17. liviob

    liviob Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Oddometer:
    702
    Location:
    Denver, Co.
    I tried running regular 85 octane once with the stock setup and the engine pings around town at 1/4 to 1/2 throttle. Using 91 octane lessons the pinging issue. It doesent make sense that I need to use high octane fuel.

    Setting "7" produces great torque lowers fuel economy by 10mpg and lessens pinging even further but does not eliminate the pinging completely. There must be a simple solution. Retarding the ignition could help.
  18. Wallowa

    Wallowa Diver Down

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
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    6,094
    Location:
    NE Oregon

    Agreed it doesn't make sense, at least with my limited knowledge. Running at "7" from"5" or stock doesn't not increase the fuel to the motor by 25%, roughly what a 10mpg reduction in mpg is...25%..strange indeed....good luck at running this down.

    Excessive carbon in cylinders really jumping the compression ratio? I agree that a higher compression ratio, excessively advanced timing or lean mixture are the normal culprits that produce pre-ignition [fold in high cylinder temps to make it even worse].....
  19. liviob

    liviob Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Oddometer:
    702
    Location:
    Denver, Co.
    I Googled pinging for this bike and found many threads about the topic. It seems that this is a common occurrence for the "R" bikes. Plenty of info in this thread.

    http://bmwsporttouring.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=599255


    Here i Googled Steptoe jumper mod. This thread is about the BB chip, but it may be useful. Have a look at post #6, #14, #15. Supposedly the third image down in the left hand column is the Steptoe low octane fuel mod for the stock BMW eprom chip. Using a jumper to connect plugs 5 and 6.

    http://www.ukgser.com/forums/showthread.php?61021-BB-Power-Chip-Instructions-Diagnostic-Plug

    http://www.ukgser.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=37206&stc=1&d=1136019928
  20. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    At what RPM are you pinging under 3/4+ throttle?