2007 990 Alternator/Stator

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by drmacaulay, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. drmacaulay

    drmacaulay letsrun.com

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2010
    Oddometer:
    98
    Location:
    Goderich, Ontario
    Any help is appreciated as I am NOT mechanically inclined, but think I have a stator problem.

    Reason I think so is because I am positive the batteries I’m using/have used are fine.
    But after the bike is jump started and boosted, I drive for 20 miles, even 60 miles or more, there is nothing in the battery.... not even the slightest whimper of juice. Although the bike does its start up routine and the blinkers will work and such..... the neutral light is on and green, but no start up’umph whatsoever to turn the engine.

    Am I correct about my diagnosis that this is the stator?

    I am sure it isn’t as simple as the battery, because I have replaced it.

    Bike has 70k kilometers and it has all other regular matienance, but never had the stator touched.

    By the way I love this bike and hope to spin another 70k km on it. But boosting it repeatedly over my 800 km trip back from Gettysburg on the weekend was a bit annoying. Thankfully it wasn’t anything much worse.
    #1
  2. Maoule

    Maoule Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,654
    Location:
    KCMO
    You have a cable (prolly one of the heavy ones) that’s not making good contact. Check that both ends of the battery cables are bright and tight. Check the cables on both sides of the start relay. If that doesn’t solve it, then we’ll talk about the charging system.
    #2
    mountaincadre likes this.
  3. mountaincadre

    mountaincadre Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,493
    Location:
    Mid Calder,Scotland
    Amen to that.
    #3
  4. DirtyADV

    DirtyADV Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,134
    Location:
    SWEDEN, Norsjö
    The voltage regulators are a weak point and common to fail also.

    It's big brown connector low on the left side at least on the adventure. Might be a place with bad connection also. Connector is not sealed so prone to corrosion.

    So might be worth looking over.

    Would start with replacing regulator if voltage is low with engine running. And wiring and connections are good before starting to look as stator.

    Not sure if there are any plug and play kits with a more modern and better regulator of MosFet type that would be an upgrade compared to original.

    /Johan
    #4
    Wastedavid likes this.
  5. tinwelp

    tinwelp Professional Idiot

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    627
    Location:
    Deepest Southern France
    With no disrespect to any of the fine commentators above, maybe the BEST way to address this is to actually diagnose the problem rather than just throw solutions at the bike? Yes the regulator/rectifier (R/R) and the big brown three-phase alternator connector are know problems, but there are others too.

    I suggest you buy a cheap multi-meter, measure battery voltage with and without the engine running, then either a) in the case of not charging (no change of battery voltage when the engine is running fast), start at the alternator and measure AC voltage coming out on any pair of the three wires with the engine running (at least 20V AC), then chase to the R/R, then measure DC coming out of it the other side of the R/R; or b) overcharging (battery voltage with the engine running is over 15V DC), replace the R/R and have the battery tested at your local shop, replace if needed.

    If and only if a) shows nothing coming out of the alternator, then pull the alternator and investigate for potential carnage.

    If the battery voltage without the engine running is around 12.5V DC (if not, charge it!) and with the engine running is around 14 or 14.5V DC, your charging system is fine... and you need to start looking elsewhere, such as at the starter relay or the heavy cables running to and from the relay to the starter.


    Electrical problems are usually very easy to fix, but you absolutely must not jump to conclusions before diagnosing the real issue. Work logically. Understand what each component is supposed to do and check to see if it is doing so...


    Cheers... Paul
    #5
  6. NKL

    NKL Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    376
    Location:
    Kent, England
    What tinwelp said
    #6
    zedtours likes this.
  7. Maoule

    Maoule Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,654
    Location:
    KCMO
    No disrespect to you either, I’ve found, on many occasions, I could have saved a lot of time down troubleshooting rabbit holes if only I’d checked the high current cables and connections.
    #7
  8. tinwelp

    tinwelp Professional Idiot

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    627
    Location:
    Deepest Southern France
    I hear you Maoule. The thing is, a sensible diagnosis is a 15 minute job at most, which can be conducted with a cheap tool... or even a bulb and a bit of cable. I've lost count of the number of times I've seen and fixed "long-standing" electrical issues with a bit of careful thought and some probing with a multimeter.

    That said, there's a good chance you may be entirely correct.

    Good luck to all involved.

    Cheers... Paul
    #8
  9. nk14zp

    nk14zp Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,751
    Location:
    Maine
    #9