2008 Paris to Dacre

Discussion in 'Canada' started by osteo, Jan 8, 2008.

  1. SQD8R

    SQD8R Eat squids and be merry

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    You did a great job Dave. :thumb No complaints from this quarter, the pace was good otherwise all it would have invited was more breaks. I was more worried about you guys getting pissed, killing me off and leaving me for dead. Throw him in the bush over there, no one will notice, it's a BMW. :lol3

    I'll be doing the Boogie. :thumb
  2. SQD8R

    SQD8R Eat squids and be merry

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    :pot Theres just something about it isnt there.[/quote]

    :nod :thumb
  3. 7plymaple

    7plymaple KLR 650

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    Hey Mike sorry to hear about the injuries! I think the guy with the soft tissue damage will be the last to heal. I messed up the soft tissue in my shoulder socket and it would pop out pretty easily for a few years. At first it would even happen when I sneased! Trust me you get some weird looks when your at the auto show and you let out a loud snease then yell AAAH DAMMIT!!!

    Thats my video. I wish I had more footage but I only took out the camera when we were broken. That tire change was the tire change from hell. It actualy started to go wrong the week before the event. I checked all my wheel bearings and they were good. But one didnt have a plastic seal/side cover on it. It wasnt dirty after all the muck I have been through with that bike so I figured the sheild thats built into the wheel spacer was good enough. Well after changing the tire twice thanks to me rushing and pinching the tube I realized I packed that bearing full of sand while kneeling on the rim to pry the tire back on. So we spend a little while trying to pick out the sand. It was wedged in there so tight!!! Luckily I had a mini can of WD40 to blast it out. But all we had to lube it with after that was chain lube.

    What an awsome ride though. Man SO many thanks to Rally Connex and everyone who helped. They know how to put on a good event!
  4. Ooobah-Moto

    Ooobah-Moto Banned

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    No deserts or nomads, but watch out for the moose

    Jean-François Bertrand, Citizen Special

    Published: Friday, July 18, 2008

    There's this internationally renowned two-week 10,000 kilometre rally, which used run from the French capital to the capital of Senegal. They called it the Paris-Dakar.
    And there's this small one-day 790-kilometre rally, which starts in Paris, Ont., and ends in Dacre, 30 kilometres west of Renfrew. They call it the Paris-Dacre.
    The logo for the Dakar is a stylized Tuareg, a nomadic man of the Sahara. The logo of the Paris-Dacre is a stylized moose, an ubiquitous quadruped of the Ottawa Valley. Both are appropriate to the terrain they cross. <!-- div class="sponsorcontent"> [ Sponsor Content ] </div --><!-- /ottawacitizen/story_sponsor.inc -->
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    And while the Dakar is open to cars, SUVs, heavy trucks, ATVs and motorcycles, the Paris-Dacre is exclusive to dual sport bikes, street-legal off-road motorcycles.

    The Dakar is a race across deserts and canyons that sometimes proves deadly. The Paris-Dacre is a challenge, not a race, not a competition. But the goal is the same -- survival.
    Of the 98 motorcycles which left Paris at 4 a.m. last Saturday, 33 arrived in Dacre, some rolling in as late as 11 p.m., after completing a grueling 790 kilometres of gravel roads, muddy dirt trails, rocky 'roads' under hydro lines and water crossings galore. Riders followed a route involving hundreds of GPS waypoints.

    Of the 26 teams that entered, Team Orange Krush -- for the colour of their KTM Austrian bikes -- arrived first, just before 6 p.m. They had been riding for 12 hours and 34 minutes, averaging 63 km/h.
    "I don't think I could have done another 20 kilometres," said exhausted John Baxter, the man who organized the first Paris-Dacre in 2005. He and his muddied Orange Krush teammates arrived with water sloshing around inside their boots.

    Rally organizer Kevin Burnett, of Rally Connex, created a route that was 80 per cent off-road -- some asphalt roads linked trails on Crown land, roadway allowances, dirt roads and several highly technical sections under hydro lines. For safety's sake, there were three cut-off points, or "bails", where participants who checked in later than a specific time were forced to take highways to get to Dacre. Teams of sweepers ensured no one was left behind.

    Thirty-three riders completed the route, 55 bailed. Most met with finishers in Dacre. A few couldn't.
    Burnett reported one participant broke a foot, another an arm. A few were left with messed up collarbones. One rider, Ray Stickland was lucky to avoid injury after colliding with a deer 30 kilometres into the rally.

    Team Kaboom -- five guys riding $100,000 worth of big displacement KTMs -- lived up to its name. Within 30 minutes (CORRECTION: we crashed at the 340km mark - 6.5hrs into the ride!), three of them had crashed out. The leader, realizing he was on the wrong trail, made a U-turn just as his teammate was looking at his GPS. At 40 km/h. Ouch!
    Steve Brooke, on the run for the second time on his Suzuki DRZ 400, turned 60 two days before the event. "Perhaps at 60, that's it. Perhaps this is my swan song," he said at lunch in Kinmount, 500 kilometres into the challenge.

    Seven hours and 300 kilometres of technical trails later, Brooke was still in great spirits. "The most challenging section was a right of way under an hydro line. It was rocky, uphill and downhill. And just out of the last major water crossing, five metres from the end, I toppled."

    Most agreed by far, the biggest challenge was the morning fog. "It was so thick, it was vertigo-inducing," said Michael Lobodzinski, from Toronto. "I couldn't tell up from down, side from side."

    Lawrence Hacking, who has the honour of being the first Canadian to complete the real thing -- Paris-Dakar, in 2001 -- arrived almost spotless in Dacre. The same could not be said for his scraped and dented motorcycle.

    Why undertake such an adventure? "I'm a glutton for punishment," replied Josh Agnesi, 33, a third-time participant from Pembroke. His teammate in Team Loose Nuts, rookie Terry Schaubel from Deep River, said at lunch that he was looking forward to the more challenging and technical sections ahead. "When it's gnarly, I want more of it. Then you can't think about the pain."
    <!-- /ottawacitizen/story_sponsor.inc --> <!-- div class="sponsorcontent"> [ Sponsor Content ] </div --> <!-- /ottawacitizen/story_sponsor.inc -->
    <script type="text/javascript">*var addthis_pub = 'canada.com'; function textCounter(field,cntfield,maxlimit) { if (field.value.length > maxlimit) // if too long...trim it! field.value = field.value.substring(0, maxlimit); // otherwise, update 'characters left' counter else { var divLabel = document.getElementById("divLabel"); divLabel.innerHTML = maxlimit - field.value.length + " characters remaining"; } } </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://s9.addthis.com/js/widget.php?v=10"></script>Stephen Miller, who returned for a third time, after being part of it in 2005 and 2006, was absolutely honest.

    "It's the stupidity that brings me back," he said. "After two years you forget how horrible it was the previous time."
  5. Corbeau

    Corbeau Been here awhile

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    Here's the link for my story in The Citizen (722 words, from the 800 + 200 optional cuts I filed...)

    Click here, but do it soon and print it out because a month from now, the story disappears from the Intarweb.

    Couple of very public thanks:

    :clap to Lynda & Kevin, at R/C. A hard copy of the paper will be in your mailbox soon.

    :clap to Rob 'arris, at CMGOnline, for the awesome water crossing pictures. I didn't have to get my feet wet.

    :clap to Osteo, for the just as awesome start pictures in Paris. I didn't have to get up that early...

    :clap to all the participants I talked to -- especially in Kinmount, where you probably had better things to do than talk to a reporter. I talked to you and your name doesn't appear in the paper? Don't feel bad, you're not alone. And space was limited in that story, so I couldn't "empty my notebook"...

    :clap to those who took the time to answer my personnal questions (the professional ones were the :clap above...) about getting into dual sport after 80k km of pavement -- and the odd accidental gravel road and crushed stone construction zone -- on my sport-tourer. I now know that a 640A would probably too much bike, too much height and my eyes are set on a 2003+ DRZ400. Time to start shopping.

    :1drink to all the finishers.

    And in 2010, I'll write the story as a first person, participant journalism. Either that or get really drunk, pull a Hunter S. Thompson and call it Fear and Loathing on the Paris-Dacre Trail... :rofl
  6. Corbeau

    Corbeau Been here awhile

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    (Here's the unedited, full-length version of the story I filed, with some pictures thrown in)

    No headline here because I didn't supply one...


    There’s this big rally, which used to start in the capital of France and end two weeks later in the capital of Senegal, the Paris-Dakar. And there’s this small rally, which starts near Brantford and ends the same day 30 kilometres west of Renfrew.

    Naturally, they named that smaller rally, now in its third edition, the “Paris-Dacre”. While the logo of the Dakar is a stylized Tuareg, a nomadic man of the Sahara, the logo of the Paris-Dacre is a stylized moose, an ubiquitous quadruped of the Valley. And while the Dakar is open to cars, SUVs, heavy trucks, ATVs and motorcycles, the Paris-Dacre is an event for dual sport bikes, street-legal off-road motorcycles.

    [​IMG]
    Every one of the 98 motorcycles that took part in the 2008 Paris-Dacre rally had one of these decals, made to look like the ones of the Paris-Dakar rally.
    Photo by Jean-François Bertrand

    Unlike it’s namesake, the Paris-Dacre rally is not a race and not a competition. But as in the Paris-Dakar, the goal for riders is to survive, to show enough endurance, determination and drive to make it to the end.

    Of the 98 motorcycles who left Paris, Ontario, at 4 a.m. last Saturday, 33 arrived in Dacre, Ontario, some rolling in as late as 11 p.m., after completing a grueling 790 kilometres of gravel roads, muddy dirt trails, rock gardens under hydro lines and many water crossings, while following a route made out of hundreds of waypoints on their GPS.

    There were 26 teams enrolled in the rally, an adventure that simulates “a day in the Dakar.” Team Orange Krush -- for the colour of their KTM Austrian bikes -- came in first just before 6 p.m., riding for 12 hours and 34 minutes, according to their GPS, at an average moving speed of 63 km/h.

    [​IMG]
    The first team of finishers, winners of bragging rights. Team Orange Krush is made of Rome Haloftis, 41, John Baxter, 54, and Ed Strohak, 51.
    Photo by Jean-François Bertrand

    “I don’t think I could have done another 20 kilometres,” said an exhausted but satisfied John Baxter, 54, who organized the first Paris-Dacre rally in 2005. His muddy and sweaty Orange Krush teammates were Ed Strohak, 51, who with Baxter first realized the obvious pun linking Dakar and Dacre, and 2006 Baja 1000 solo finisher Rome Haloftis, 41. All had wet feet inside their swamped boots.

    Rally organizer Kevin Burnett, of Rally Connex, created a route that was 80 per cent off-road -- some asphalt roads linked trails on Crown land, roadway allowances, dirt roads and some very technical sections under hydro lines. For safety’s sake, there were three cut-off points, or “bails” where participants who checked in later than a specific time were forced to take highways to get to Dacre. Teams of sweepers ensured that no one was left behind.

    If 33 riders completed the whole route, 55 bailed at one point or another and met with the finishers at the Dacre community center, to camp in a baseball field. Ten riders elected to head for home after a bail point instead.

    Some didn’t have a choice, because of injuries. Burnett reported there was a participant with a broken foot, another with a broken arm, a few with messed up collarbones. One rider, Ray Stickland, collided with a deer 30 kilometres into the rally. (He escaped uninjured. The same cannot be said of the deer.)

    Team Kaboom, five guys riding $100,000 worth of big displacement KTMs, lived up to its name. Within 30 minutes, three riders where out of commission. They had a crash, followed by a collision between two riders -- the leader, realizing he was on the wrong trail, made a U-turn just as his teammate was looking at his GPS. At 40 km/h.

    Steve Brooke, taking part for the second time in the Paris-Dacre on his Suzuki DRZ 400, turned 60 two days before the event. “Perhaps at 60, that’s it. Perhaps this is my swan song,” he said at lunch in Kinmount, 500 kilometres into the challenge.

    Seven hours later, and 300 kilometres of technical trails further in Dacre, Brooke was still in great spirits. “The most challenging section was a right of way under an hydro line. It was rocky, uphill and downhill. And just out of the last major water crossing, five metres from the end, I toppled.”

    [​IMG]
    The route had a fair number of water crossings such as this one, where participants also had to go over a culvert.
    Photo by Rob Harris, CMGOnline

    But by far, the biggest challenge was the fog in the morning, for the first 100 kilometres. It was so thick, it was vertigo-inducing, said Michael Lobodzinski, from Toronto. “I couldn’t tell up from down, side from side.”

    [​IMG]
    Team Orange Krush at the start of the Paris-Dacre Rally, at 4 a.m. in Paris, Ontario.
    Photo by Osteo

    Lawrence Hacking is the first Canadian to have completed the Paris-Dakar, in 2001, an event that changed his life. Riding a Honda Varadero, a long-term test bike loaned to Cycle Canada, Hacking arrived almost spotless in Dacre. The motorcycle arrived with more scrapes and dents than it had when it left Paris, though.

    [​IMG]
    Lawrence Hacking was riding a Honda Varadero, a long-term test bike issued to Cycle Canada.
    Photo by Rob Harris, CMGOnline

    Why undertake such an adventure? “I’m a glutton for punishment,” replied Josh Agnesi, 33, a third-time participant from Pembroke. His teammate in Team Loose Nuts, rookie Terry Schaubel from Deep River, said at lunch that he was looking forward to the more challenging and technical sections ahead. “When it’s gnarly, I want more of it. Then you can’t think about the pain.”

    Rob Harris, editor of cmgonline.com, had a lot of time to think, riding the KTM 690 Enduro he was testing. At his third attempt to complete the Paris-Dacre, he had to bail and rode 90 minutes on highways. “On the trail, you’re alert and it overrides the tiredness and the pain. Not on pavement.”

    [​IMG]
    Rob Harris, editor of cmgonline.com, contemplates life in front of a water crossing. Photo courtesy of Rob Harris.
    Photo by Rob Harris, CMGOnline

    What made Stephen Miller return to the rally for a third time, after being part of it in 2005 and 2006? “It’s the stupidity. After two years you forget how horrible it was the previous time.”

    Allison Grummette, 20, completed the entire rally in 17 hours, on her first participation, with her father. Marianne Smith, from The Beaches, was at her second Paris-Dacre. She had a fabulous day despite having to bail out because her team had some serious mechanical issues which slowed them down. She enjoys the camaraderie among dual sport riders, bumping into people on the trails (“Not literally!”, she adds), asking “hey, my bike’s stuck in the mud, please help me.”

    [​IMG]
    Marianne Smith, from The Beaches, at the end of the 2008 Paris-Dacre rally, next to her 400cc KTM dual sport bike.
    Photo by Jean-François Bertrand

    Her husband, still out on the trail with his team, introduced her to dual sport riding eight years ago. “I’m having a good time, meeting new people,” she said.

    Odds are, she’ll be part of the next Paris-Dacre rally, in 2010. Just as for this year, her goal will be to make it to the end.
  7. Ooobah-Moto

    Ooobah-Moto Banned

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    Corbeau... great write-up! .......(I'm sure you found the little correction regarding Team Kaboom - make that "30 minuets" - 6.5hrs!!! :D )



    Here's the report from CMGonline.com - LINK
  8. Corbeau

    Corbeau Been here awhile

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    Thanks...

    Actually, what I meant to convey -- but obviously it didn't work -- was Kaboom's had two get offs, 30 minutes apart.
  9. Ooobah-Moto

    Ooobah-Moto Banned

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    No worries.... we'll get'em next year! :evil

    Nice meeting you in Kinmount - hope to see you again at Doughy's Eastern Ontario ride!
  10. doughy

    doughy Less excitable then I used to be

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    2010??? IS there no P2D in 2009? ???
  11. canadian XR

    canadian XR Adventurer

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    :clap:clap:clap.....Excellent write Up......:clap:clap:clap:clap
  12. 'arris

    'arris Adventurer

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    Nicely done with the write up JF.

    Just finished the two-parter for the CMG Online website as to the trials and tribulations of Team CMG (and others)! For those interested, here's the link:

    http://cmgonline.com/content/view/672/57/

    Thanks to everyone who provided their stories and pics to help with the write up. Appologies if I messed up any due credits ...

    Cheers, Rob
  13. Ooobah-Moto

    Ooobah-Moto Banned

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    [quote='arris]Nicely done with the write up JF.

    Just finished the two-parter for the CMG Online website as to the trials and tribulations of Team CMG (and others)! For those interested, here's the link:

    http://cmgonline.com/content/view/672/57/

    Thanks to everyone who provided their stories and pics to help with the write up. Appologies if I messed up any due credits ...

    Cheers, Rob[/quote]

    Rob.... great write up. It's a bonus not being limited to 800words!

    See ya'll in 2010. November of that year I will also be contesting in the Baja1000.
  14. sallydog

    sallydog https://sallydog.smugmug.com/Pets/LD-Travel/

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    so how did the pine barren elite place. did you make us proud?
  15. shipwrek12001

    shipwrek12001 Shipwrek

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    Just curious can this ride be put on for 2009? For me it was the best ride of the summer...:clap
  16. Ooobah-Moto

    Ooobah-Moto Banned

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    Next one is scheduled for 2010 :becca

    Team Kaboom - do I hear a hell ya!??! :augie



    In the meantime, keep an eye open for the "ONTARIO RALLY RAID 2009" - more info to come at a later date.
  17. Deadly99

    Deadly99 Fast and Far

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    :lurk

    "In the meantime, keep an eye open for "ONTARIO RALLY RAID 2009" - more info to come at a later date."
  18. shipwrek12001

    shipwrek12001 Shipwrek

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    :ear :ear :freaky :ear :ear :dj :drums I'm all ears with a drum roll......
  19. dirtinblood

    dirtinblood Ontariariario

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    Wondering what to do every other year? The next P to D will be in 2010..that's true. Every year in between, there will be another large event, with the same grand scale and endurance as the P to D demands. In 2009 there will be a 12 hour Rally, with more trails than the P to D. Approximate distance is 500km. It will be based out of Belleville. Sign-up Friday night, ride all day Saturday 7 am to 7 pm, returning to the same location, stay the night and compare stories, attend the awards presentation on Sunday morning after breakfast, then take your time heading home. During the event the competitors will be collecting receipts and validation tickets at various extremes of the route, some for base points, some for bonus points. These will be collected and tabulated, and combined with checkpoint times to give a final score.
    I will be posting some details in the next few weeks.
    As with all RallyConnex events, this will be fully supported with sweep riders, support truck, satellite tracking, completely tested routing, and full organization.
  20. HappyGoLucky

    HappyGoLucky Goeie Grys Giftige Gert!

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    A rare post by Kevin!

    I wonder if you'll let a noob SAfrican join y'all on this one. No P2D? :cry