2013 Husqvarna 650 Terra

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by grunkster, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. netteb16

    netteb16 hangersoutters

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    50
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    While great bikes, the 610/630 certainly aren't high mileage bikes. If you're looking to put thousands of miles a year on a bike, those bikes just won't cut it. I don't think the motor is made for it.

    It's not apples to apples. This, ultimately, is more of a street bike.
  2. SamM

    SamM Jeep Overlander

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,478
    Location:
    West Virginia
    Why? Because, I can! Yeah, the KLR guys and many skeptics said the same thing when I did this to my KLR, "why bother dropping weight from a pig?" Basically, to have a lighter, faster pig. Dropping weight increases the power to weight ratio. It's just simple physics really. The TR650 seems like a good candidate for the type of riding I do. It's off-road enough for me and that's all I care about. I don't plan to do triples with it. Just some light off-roading. The Youtube videos show it do that just fine. It needs to haul a load for camping and adventure riding. Much like my KLR has done in the past. My KLR had a long travel Cogent Dynamics shock and KX450F forks. Yes, I added inverts to a KLR. The TR already has them. A little reworking should help them out. I have no problem spending a little money to make a bike better. Checkout my KLX250SF in the for sale section. Total overkill.

    The TE630 was a great bike but it was not made for racking up high mileage. I was looking seriously at them and I almost bought one, when they were suddenly and without reason discontinued. Great move BMW! A one model year bike, is not something that I want to get involved with. The TE511 is clearly more capable than the TR650, but it won't do what I want to do. If I was looking to connect trails by riding short stretches of pavement, it would be perfect. I think it depends on the type of riding you do. I'm not hardcore off-road. I just like going off-road. Big difference! The guys that I ride with are much like myself, getting a little older, looking for nice roads to ride and enjoying a good trip, when we have the time. We ride everything from a KTM 950, yes I have one, to the DR650. The V-Strom to Harley and Honda cruisers. The 950 left me wanting... something lighter. The KLR didn't have enough power. The TR should be just right! I'd like to stay on the dualsport side of the fence. Most streetbikes do not appeal to me and I have no use for cruisers, at all. YMMV
  3. netteb16

    netteb16 hangersoutters

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    50
    Location:
    Denver, CO

    Well said. Applies to the 610/630 as well.
  4. Rattletrap

    Rattletrap When in doubt-Gas it

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    307
    Location:
    Heart of Dixie
    I hope these bikes do really well. I think I would look at a Strada or Nuda to compliment my 610.

    About maintenance issues on the 610, some have had a few, mine has 18,500 miles with zero problems. I changed the spark plug at 15,000 because I felt guilty. Figure I'll tear it down at 25,000 just to have a look inside.
  5. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    15,174
    Location:
    Northside Brisbane, Qld Australia
    I would think that a lot of Stephan's bits for the XChallenge will fit onto this bike which would be good as it is high quality gear. Other Euro bling makers are already interested in doing things for this bike.
  6. Ol'NumNuts

    Ol'NumNuts A Bloke and his Akita- Flynn

    Joined:
    May 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    498
    Location:
    Brisbane, Queensland
    Yeah, that's about the only good thing about getting the bike 'last' is that Europe and the rest of the world get to iron out the teething bugs (apparently) and hopefully they sell well enough for the Farkle makers to take interest....
  7. SamM

    SamM Jeep Overlander

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,478
    Location:
    West Virginia
    The Schulz Cycle website lists the weight of the TR650 as 368lbs.

    [​IMG]
  8. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,032
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
  9. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    15,174
    Location:
    Northside Brisbane, Qld Australia
    Weight: 410lb (186kg) wet, 90% full tank Terra: 404lb (183kg)
  10. netteb16

    netteb16 hangersoutters

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    50
    Location:
    Denver, CO
  11. LukasM

    LukasM Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,513
    Location:
    On a RTW ride - currently touring the U.S.
    The KLR doesn't really exist anywhere outside of the US, they haven't sold them in Europe for about 20 years.

    It's just you boys that have a thing for heavy, old and slow things! :rofl
  12. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    40,085
    Location:
    Annapolis, MD
    You left out the most important thing: cheap
  13. SamM

    SamM Jeep Overlander

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,478
    Location:
    West Virginia
    The weight from Shulz Cycle is the dry weight. That dry weight better reflects the true weight of the bike. Different models bikes carry different amounts of fuel. Unless you compare dry weights, it's like comparing apples and oranges.
  14. LukasM

    LukasM Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,513
    Location:
    On a RTW ride - currently touring the U.S.
    Absolutely correct. The price of the Terra should really make this an interesting offering for the riders that previously stuck with Japanese bikes because of the high cost of Euro bikes. :clap


    Dry weight is also an irrelevant number, what you want to compare is wet weight ready to ride, but no fuel, so you don't punish the bikes with bigger tanks.


    I am wondering where all that extra weight of the Terra comes from compared to the X-BMWs?

    - Steel swingarm maybe 5 lbs
    - Steel subframe maybe 6 lbs (I think this is what Colebatch measured going from stock alu to Touratech steel on his X-Ch)
    - Steel amin frame maybe 10 lbs

    The rest should be roughly the same, plastic underseat tank, USD forks, wheel sizes etc.
  15. SBG

    SBG Neville1 to TT boys

    Joined:
    May 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    374
    Location:
    Rehoboth MA
    I have an old DR650 with steel swingarm. I believe they weigh 20 lbs and the aluminum weighs 9 lbs according to someone that was modifiying a new swing arm to fit his older bike.

  16. larryboy

    larryboy Just obey!

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Oddometer:
    31,048
    Location:
    Über Alles,California


    Fill 'em up for a true wet weight, I've never ridden a bike that didn't have gas in it. That's the only number that matters on any bike. :deal
  17. LukasM

    LukasM Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,513
    Location:
    On a RTW ride - currently touring the U.S.
    Then by installing a lighter but bigger plastic tank instead of a steel one the manufacturer would make a bike worse by your standards?

    I can tell you that I definitely won't fill up the tank on my bike when I am going on a hard off road ride (as in trials style steps/climbs/drops etc) where weight really matters and I don't need the range. Just like I will have to carry extra gas bottles or bladders in addition to a full tank when I go touring with other bikes with bigger tanks or in an area where there is no gas.

    The necessary fuel weight is more or less the same between each bike for each ride, since the differences in consumption are quite small in general, maybe 10 - max. 20% if ridden at the same pace. There are huge differences in tank capacity however, think 100% between KTM 690 and a KLR for example.

    That's why IMO it makes sense to weigh the bikes with the same amount of fuel in them (or none at all).
  18. larryboy

    larryboy Just obey!

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Oddometer:
    31,048
    Location:
    Über Alles,California

    You're talking in circles about a gravel road bike, fill it up, can't ride this bike without fuel. Your IMO is wrong IMHO, that's all.
  19. LukasM

    LukasM Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,513
    Location:
    On a RTW ride - currently touring the U.S.
    I'm trying to explain the one weight standard I feel is best to make all bikes comparable.

    You don't have to fill up a tank just because you have the capacity, just like you are not going to get around carrying extra fuel because your tank is small if you need it.

    Leave the fuel out of it, IMHO. :evil
  20. larryboy

    larryboy Just obey!

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Oddometer:
    31,048
    Location:
    Über Alles,California

    I have yet to put half a tank of gas in a motorcycle in 30 years of riding.

    By your thinking we should take the tires off too, some weigh more and it's just not fair to that bike. Chains too, oh no...the old 610 came with an aluminum rear sprocket...no sprockets allowed in the LukasM weight standard.

    The only number that matters is full of fuel and ready to ride.


    :freaky