2017 Africa Twin O2 Sensor

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by FPGT72, Dec 17, 2019.

  1. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,311
    Location:
    Kingsville MO
    Installed my crash bars over the weekend and snagged a wire for the o2 sensor....now I am trying to find a replacement and all I can find are o2 eliminator kits for the thing.

    Got the check engine light and have not tried to clear the codes yet....hopefully it just got confused but I think I pulled a wire a bit hard and might have damaged to sensor.

    any suggestions on where to find a replacement....short of paying the price for honda.
    #1
  2. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,295
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    Not off the top of my head.
    you could give Power commander a call. They make the plug that eliminates the O2 sensor. pretty sure it's just a resistor of some value to fool the ECU.
    #2
  3. RBMann

    RBMann Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    250
    Location:
    North of Seattle
    #3
  4. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,311
    Location:
    Kingsville MO
    thanks.....I think I gave the wires a little tug....took the exhaust loose to make things more easy and give me more room, and forgot about the O2....so all the weight got taken up by the wires.....hoped for the best but got the light.

    Going to try to reset the codes and give it a go...if not I think I might have pulled a wire.
    #4
  5. DCTFAN

    DCTFAN 2019 CRF1000LD | 2016 CRF1000LD | Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,038
    Location:
    GA
    This may be another option for you:
    I used it to delete the O2 sensor
    https://smartmoto-electronics.com/o...to_brand_id=2&moto_model_id=51&moto_year=2016
    #5
  6. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,311
    Location:
    Kingsville MO
    Ok....explain why you would want to delete/remove the O2 sensor.

    As I understand fuel injection....and I know a few things about it when it comes to 4 wheels, but I think gas into motor is about the same.

    Open loop is no O2....the "computer" has settings it might measure incoming air (depending on vintage) will read throttle, and rpm...again depending....and put X fuel into engine based on how fast engine runs.

    Closed loop you have O2....you look at the air that comes in and the air that goes out and adjustments are made for everything including air density, temp, humidity...then we look at the air coming out see if it is too lean or rich and adjustments are made.

    Having screwed with everything from old Bosch k-Jetronic to mega squirt....this is in a real small nutshell how it works.

    Now unless you KNOW...just how that fuel is mapped for where ever that motor is going to be running...in all the different conditions it will be running in and how it is going to be run taking the O2 away is not really the best idea.....even if you are using a "programmer" you still want the ability to to sniff its ass to see if you need to feed it more or less.

    So many "tuners" have sold the bill of goods that....well the feds make the standards so stupid the people that make X have to make them run so lean to pass.....well back in the carb days yes.....now not so much, everyone does it...I hate to tell you all this, but GM did this back in the 90's when I worked there....where VW got in trouble is the "computer" knew when it was being tested....if the car is set to idle at X to pass all the time, unless this or that reading get to X.....well that is just fine.....it is a very thin line.

    So tell me just why do you think taking your "computers" ability to adjust to rich/lean away is a good thing?
    #6
  7. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,295
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    No idea.
    But, with the PCV, dynojet recommends leaving the OEM O2 plugged in.
    The kit comes with a resistor plug, which likely gives a set average resistance reading to the ECU at all times.
    So that's how I run mine. I know it's not your case, but if the bike is stock it would make sense to fix the O2 sensor and plug back in.
    It's a total pain in the ass to get to, but are you not able to soder the wires back into the oem connector and call it a day?
    #7
    DCTFAN likes this.
  8. DCTFAN

    DCTFAN 2019 CRF1000LD | 2016 CRF1000LD | Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,038
    Location:
    GA
    My bike runs fine without the O2 sensor. It's quick, easy and it's reversible; meaning anyone can try it for kicks and revert if they don't care for it.
    .
    If you can screw on a light bulb, you can do this but I see the OP got this handled. :)

    .

    I just think the engine runs better most of the time; My bike has more than 60k miles and the subtle change after the O2 delete was unexpected but preferable.
    So far it's good and I like it! YMMV
    I haven't had the bike in this configuration in too many different climate/elevations yet to confirm it's "better".
    #8
  9. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,295
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    I don't know about the easy...lol
    That connector is in a super ignorant spot.
    When I had the dynojet provided resistors in there, then found out that the PCV actually runs better with OEM 02 in, there was quite a bit of swearing to get it out without breaking anything.
    But, it's done, and runs great!
    #9
    DCTFAN likes this.
  10. FPGT72

    FPGT72 Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,311
    Location:
    Kingsville MO
    It would be interesting to put a sniffer on it and see just what it is doing.....I would think....again depending on where you are altitude, air temps, humidity and such.....it would run over all worse....as a static setting is just that static. What might work at 75F and 30% may not work well at 100F and 99%, or my last ride before I busted the thing a 45F and about 10% humidity....

    The idea behind fuel injection is constant adjustment....taking the O2 out of it....and I would bet that it is a wide band type O2....it is one of Honda's upper tier bikes so I think it would have the higher tech type O2...If you take that away your bike is not going to adapt to changing conditions.

    I think it is in not a bad spot....but then again I am judging it against 1980's vintage GM cars that stuck that stupid thing in the hardest places.
    #10
  11. DCTFAN

    DCTFAN 2019 CRF1000LD | 2016 CRF1000LD | Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,038
    Location:
    GA
    I looked at the troubleshooting pages in the service manual and the connector has only four pins
    - voltage out to ECU
    - ground wire and
    - the heating element takes two
    The doodads that eliminate the sensor just short the two pins for the heating element which results
    in the output remaining a constant.
    What the ECU then does with this is in the coding and I have no clue.
    I'd think there is enough feedback from the other sensors to optimize fueling - it's happy.
    .
    PS. I run a straight pipe with the OEM muffler- no CAT; so there's a lot at play here, I agree.
    #11