2017 Yamaha SCR950 Scrambler

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Eddy Alvarez, Jun 8, 2016.

  1. Patek

    Patek Long timer

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    IMG_20190827_171326391.jpg
    Quite a bit of sag actually and I had to sit on it to get the belt adjusted correctly Took it for a short ride this afternoon after adjusting the belt. Left it a little looser than stock. When I have some more time tomorrow I'll take it on the highways to see how it acts. IMG_20190827_171429057.jpg IMG_20190827_171340668.jpg
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  2. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    I’m really liking the mefo on the front and the VRM-163 on the rear. I’m tearing it up through the MABDR and the font has never washed out, even after hitting some deep sand. It slid a little and then hooked up and I didn’t fall.

    The rear tire is great in gravel. The stock Bridgestone would slide out suddenly and randomly, and was scary as fuck. The VRM slides out predictably and if I just keep on the throttle it’ll straighten out and it just feels awesome.

    My suspension is doing very well on this trip as well. My setup is pretty much perfect!

    Charles.
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  3. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    So I just went on a fully loaded 1500 mile trip on the SCR950. In all honesty, it was pretty brutal. The seat is misery and the bars need another inch or two of rise and pullback. The motor vibrates too much above 65, and it’s just a poor long distance tourer.

    On the gravel it was fun, but there’s a reason I named my bike Thor. In part, because not even the hulk can stop him. Lots of hairy gravel switchbacks with steep drop-offs to fall from or ditches to get stuck in. Every one of those downhill gravel section was pucker all the way. Even on the street, in the technical tight switchbacks my suspension mods shined — I had plenty of cornering clearance. But the front brakes faded fast, increasing stopping distance and just generally putting a damper on spirited riding. Not fast. Just spirited.

    Switching to cruise mode, I was still passing Harleys left and right on WV backroad twisties, but I didn’t want cruise mode. I wanted a quicker pace to take my mind off how much my back and ass hurt. Seriously it needs a second brake rotor up front, big time.

    Overall the trip was fun though. I did hit a rock so hard it bent the bash plate and all four mounting brackets. Damn thing fell off and I had to repair it on the roadside as it was dragging. But it saved my oil filter and engine case! Otherwise it was uneventful. My 12.25” shocks performed flawlessly, soaking up big bumps on the very poor condition gravel roads.

    But, I think I need a different bike for long distance.

    Charles.
  4. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    Pics of the carnage.

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    Note in the last pic how all four brackets are bent, and the top and bottom in the distance are no longer parallel.

    Charles.
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  5. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Just did a 1400 mile trip on the SCR. Yeah, it beat me up a little but I think the Corbin is the reason it did not kill me. Here's a pic from the trip. My fully loaded isn't near what Chopper's is. We only did a few miles of gravel because my partner was on a new Indian Scout Bobber. I suspect he's in more pain than me. I do agree with Charles on the bike though... it is not for long distance touring unless you have the luxury of cutting it up into a bunch of days around the 350-400 mile marks.

    [​IMG]

    You can read the full trip report here with my thoughts on the Scrambler at the end of the ride here: https://advrider.com/f/threads/misadventures-of-a-hoosierbilly-motorcycle-tramp.925117/page-12
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  6. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    Fully loaded pic btw.

    590D9582-261D-4899-B2A8-AA4C32051E55.jpeg

    Charles.
  7. Dread

    Dread Putt-Putt Adventurer

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    I think it’s fine for 250-350 mile days, and that is how I generally tour. Would not want to pull a 500 mile day on it. It also sucks on the highway into a headwind all day. Ask me how I know.

    Dang Charles, you thrashed that bike hard! Nice to know the bash plate will give up the ghost if needed, not nice to know it will dangle...

    I suppose that’s why I also have a KLR.
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  8. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades... Super Supporter

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    That's the way I am anyway. I'm not a megamile rider, I'm happy to get rolling by 10, stop for lunch, then finish up around 6 somewhere. Just a good pace and fun. Get a bit off schedule and there is still plenty of time to get where I want to be. Did that years ago with the ex wife riding from VA Beach to Ohio on Route 250 through VA/WV/OH, great run almost 500 miles on the dot to where I was going. The coastal plains sucked, but boy was the rest of the trip fantastic. We did about 200 miles the first and second days then finished out the third day. Allowed us to stop in at an antiques shop near some little town and get stuck behind a parade in another little town. No big deal. Saved our butts a bit too.

    I hate it when the goal is the mileage, I want it to be the ride. So that's what we do. Fact is I'd rather truck/trailer bikes through boring flat land areas then unload and ride where it is fun most of the time.
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  9. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    The stock Seat is passable with the addition of padded bicycle shorts on under my riding pants.... but five days of it was too much. A Corbin may well be a future purchase. But really the thing that killed me the most was my back and elbows. I need to do something about the bars, and I need a roll bag on the passenger section so I can lean back on long trips.

    my shoulders and elbows are still really, really sore today. Tried riding the 250 and though the seating position is vastly different, it still pointed out all the sore spots. Except my back. The 250 has a much better seating position for my back.

    Charles.
  10. Dread

    Dread Putt-Putt Adventurer

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    So here is the downside to having a bag on the seat - it really limits cockpit space. You are right, it makes for a great backrest when on roads, and I really liked having it there when I was driving to and from my last destination (also about a 1500 mile trip). I took it all off when I got there and rode the dirt and gravel roads without the gear on it. It would be MUCH harder to handle on those roads with a tail bag on it. And I'm with you - the bars need to come up and back. I also have a Seat Concepts seat. Great up to about 200 miles by itself, then it starts getting to you. I added a sheepskin pad and it made it work well for the whole trip.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
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  11. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    Having a thought here. There is (was?) a lowering kit for the C-spec bolt, which is just a little bracket that attaches to the swingarm and relocates the bottom shock mount further back.

    I'm thinking this lowering kit, with some long-travel shocks, like those RFY shocks, would make for a very interesting setup. First of all, it would open up a whole slew of aftermarket shocks that have longer lengths and more travel. It'd be possible to retain stock ride height AND increase travel significantly. Of course, I'd have to add a belt tensioner for long travel shocks, but I have some ideas for that too.

    Charles.
  12. Skeee

    Skeee Adventurer

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    I love the look of this bike. I am tempted to get one. I am more weekend warrior than tourer. I wish it had 6 gears though
  13. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    I will eventually document a chain drive conversion, then you can use any gearing you want for the cost of a custom rear sprocket. ($70 ish)

    Charles.
  14. Skeee

    Skeee Adventurer

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    but that's like work. I am middle age and lazy. just want to hop on and ride
  15. bringenufgun

    bringenufgun Been here awhile

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    apparently halfway to motorcycle hell
    was at Big St Charles (the dealer heavily discounting new SCR's) and they still have at least three in stock. had a major fire in their Indian, japanese, atv, watercraft building and all their inventory, parts, service, etc. is jammed into the Harley building and parking lot next door. if someone is looking for a deal on one, i think now would be a good time.
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  16. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    So... I’ve been working in the garage, and I built a couple prototypes of the stainless steel midpipe I designed for the SCR950. Trying out different methods of building them, different clamp ideas, different finishes, and practicing my stainless welding techniques.

    image.jpg

    The brushed finish actually shows more blemishes from the mandrel bender than the polished finish. Polished finish is a big time sink, and all the marks can’t be removed quickly enough to make it worth my while, I think.

    I like the welded on clamp idea, but it takes too much extra time, so a simple cross cut and a t-clamp is the better solution.

    I have ideas for a muffler hanger, but haven’t built a prototype for that yet.

    So I’m wondering what kind of price target to sell these at. Would there be interest in the polished version up top with a t-clamp for $100?

    Now that I have my fabrication techniques more or less down, I could order parts and make a big batch for resale if there is solid interest.

    Charles.
  17. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    Here it is attached to a SCR950/Bolt header.

    01C205EF-1A36-4E09-9E8D-C336A2B93DE5.jpeg

    It allows you to install any 1.75” muffler on the bolt or SCR950, with a nice 15 degree upward angle.

    Here is what it looks like with a SuperTrapp installed.

    8EFBD8C5-C34C-49D2-BF6E-BEF332A3AD5C.jpeg

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    88DD0C83-EB4A-4FC1-A207-2AD0152F8738.jpeg


    (Note it’s the brushed version on my bike)

    And of course, the O2 sensor screws right in, so this is completely plug and play.

    Charles.
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  18. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    I could also probably do a ceramic black version eventually. I’d want to use a quality coating, not something from a rattle can.

    Charles.
  19. HapHazard

    HapHazard Be Kind - Rewind

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    ^Beautiful work!
    Either finish looks great to me.
    (Classiest part on the bike!)
  20. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    That's always "the rub" isn't it? How much is your time worth - especially to you (for both the R&D as well as "production")? How broad is the customer base (i.e., any interest by the Bolt owner community or do they prefer the chopper horizontal pipe; other bikes that could use this product)? Supply chain considerations (cost of raw materials, cost of warehousing finished product, cost/timeliness of shipping finished product)? Liability issues (who gets blamed when the customer needs to have an emissions test and there is no cat; the particular section of pipe had an unknown flaw and failed)? The answers to all these questions determines whether or not you are approaching this as a "jobbie" (hobby gone wild) or a business. Most hobbyists are fortunate if they break even financially; it is much more a labor of love.
    If this is more the former, I would offer to build for customers on demand rather than a production build.