2018-2019 Africa Twin Adventure Sports

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by cabanza, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. Sailor Jack

    Sailor Jack Been here awhile

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    I too wonder if Honda went with Kashima on the forks of this model... call me crazy but I prefer cables to FBW on an off-road bike. (though I did opt for DCT so perhaps I don't deserve an opinion)
    #81
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  2. ThirtyOne

    ThirtyOne I got my wings back. Supporter

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    #82
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  3. Fat Toney

    Fat Toney Long timer

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    Bigger tank would be nice, otherwise I’m good with my ‘16. They can keep the bigger flimsy skid plate.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #83
  4. lukasteam

    lukasteam Life is beautiful !!! Supporter

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    Is the new Adventure one will be available with manual trans or dct only ?
    ...and yes we do need a cruise control , because I'd say 90% of riders would like to have it on dual sport bike . It's really nice to give that right wrist a break on these long stretches of a highway .
    #84
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  5. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    Pssss, at
    Well, I won't spend 90 percent of my time using it but I'd agree that adventure bike = touring bike for middle aged men with tired knees. Riders who want to spend a lot more time off-road (not dirt roads) will get something a lot lighter.
    #85
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  6. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    Also surprised Honda didn't seize the opportunity to add metal panniers like Outback Trekkers. Same crappy plastic ones...
    #86
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  7. Nostop

    Nostop Been here awhile

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    • Key features

    • Africa Twin Adventure Sports has a larger fairing matched with an 80mm taller screen to offer greater wind protection, and comes standard with heated grips and a 12 volt accessory socket, facilitating longer tours in wide-ranging conditions

    • Adventure Sports model comes standard with larger sump guard and front light bars, as well as brushed-aluminum cowling panels, rear mudguard, and easily removable steel rack
    • Adventure Sports model has larger, 6.37-gallon fuel tank (compared to 4.97 gallons on the standard model), extending range

    • Both CRF1000L Africa Twin models now have auto-canceling turn indicators

    • Adventure Sports model's seat features a flatter profile and a 1.2-inch-taller height than standard model. The seat adjusts .8 inches, for a seat height of either 35.4 inches or 36.2 inches (compared to 33.5 inches and 34.3 inches). Handlebar position is 1.3 inches higher and .2 inches rearward compared to the standard version

    • Adventure Sports model has a storage pocket on rear right

    • On both models, the rider's foot pegs are now wider and affixed via stouter steel mounting plates, whereas the passenger foot-peg hangers have been redesigned to allow more room for the rider's feet when standing

    • On both models, instruments are positioned at a shallower angle to allow the rider to see them more easily from a standing position

    • Adventure Sports model has updated, longer-travel Showa suspension, resulting in 10.6 inches of ground clearance (compared to 9.8 inches). On both models, shock preload, rebound damping, and compression damping are fully adjustable

    • Both models have compact two-piece, radial-mount, four-piston front-brake calipers and "wave" floating rotors front and rear. The lightweight two-channel ABS can be turned off at the rear

    • Both models feature front and rear wheels in size 21 and 18 inches, respectively, with stainless-steel spokes for improved durability

    • On both models, the 998cc SOHC eight-valve parallel-twin engine is updated with a new airbox, now featuring a 20mm longer funnel length and matched to redesigned exhaust internals that significantly improve midrange response and sound quality

    • On both models, the engine's balancer-shaft weights have been lightened by 10.6 ounces for added character and feel in power delivery

    • Water pump is housed within the clutch casing, with a thermostat integrated into the cylinder head, while water and oil pumps are driven by the engine's balancer shafts, contributing to a compact engine and optimum ground clearance

    • New for 2018, a lithium-ion battery is 5.1 lbs. lighter than the previous lead-acid unit

    • Both versions available with Honda's advanced automatic Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT), delivering consistent, quick, seamless gear changes on-road or off. Rider can select from three different shifting modes, and a G switch enhances off-road functionality by reducing the amount of clutch slip during gear changes

    • New for 2018, both Africa Twin models have Throttle-By-Wire system (TBW), opening the door to four

    • individual riding modes and an expanded Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) system

    • HSTC now features seven levels (up from three), to adapt to a wide variety of conditions. HSTC can also be completely switched off, and three levels of power and engine braking are available
    #87
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  8. Nostop

    Nostop Been here awhile

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    And a bit more detailed info.
    The Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ steel semi-double cradle frame provides nimble on-road manners plus high-speed stability matched to genuine off-road ability, agility and strength. Ground clearance is 270mm (20mm more than the Africa Twin) with wheelbase of 1575mm and rake and trail of 27.5°/115. Wet weight is 243kg (253kg DCT).



    With stroke length of 252mm (up 22mm on the standard Africa Twin) the 45mm Showa cartridge-type inverted front fork offers excellent long-travel performance and control; rebound and compression damping are fully adjustable. A cast aluminium top yoke and forged bottom yoke – joined by hollow aluminium stem shaft – clamp the fork legs with two bolts each top and bottom.



    Matching the supple front suspension the Showa rear shock delivers an extra 20mm travel, at 240mm. Its upper mount is set low for mass centralisation and it features a 46mm cylinder remote reservoir for stable damping control under more extreme off-road riding conditions. Spring preload can be adjusted via a dial on the shock body; rebound and compression damping are also fully adjustable.



    There are some other updates shared between both Africa Twins that off-road riders are sure to appreciate: the rider’s footpegs are now wider, and feature beefed-up steel mounting plates. The pillion footpeg hangers have also been redesigned to allow more room for the rider’s feet when standing and the instruments are angled at a shallower angle to allow the rider to see them easily from a standing position.



    The Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ styling is less minimalist than the Africa Twin; the dual headlights are shared but it has a larger fairing matched with an 80mm taller screen to offer greater wind protection. It also features heated grips as standard plus an AC socket.



    A large sump guard is unique to the machine and protects the underside while the front side pipes guard the bodywork. Brushed aluminium cowling panels add tough appeal and class; the rear mudguard and stainless steel rack are also easily removed. Aluminium side cases will be available.



    For extended off-road use the seat features a flatter profile – and is 50mm taller – than the standard CRF1000L Africa Twin. It adjusts 20mm to either 900mm or 920mm (compared to 850mm and 870mm); there’s also a rear side pocket tucked away on the right. To match the raised seat height the handlebar position is 32.5mm higher and pulled back 5mm.



    The rear indicators now also offer an Emergency Stop Signal function. At a minimum speed of 53km/h, with either brake working, if negative acceleration of a minimum of 6.0m/s2 is detected the hazard lights flash, warning other road users a hard stop is in process. At the same speed the threshold is reduced with ABS in play – for wet conditions – to a negative acceleration of a minimum 2.5m/s2.



    The indicators now also auto-cancel. Rather than using a simple timer, the system compares front and rear wheel speed difference and calculates when to cancel the indication relative to the situation.



    Compact two-piece radial-mount four-piston calipers work dual 310mm ‘wave’ floating discs through sintered pads and serve up consistent stopping power and feel on-road or off. The rear 256mm ‘wave’ disc features hole punching and shaping to deliver secure braking performance. Lightweight two-channel ABS can be turned off for the rear caliper only.



    Like the CRF450R Rally, the CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports uses 21/18-inch front rear spoked wheels, wearing 90/90-21 and 150/70-18 tyres. The spokes are manufactured in stainless steel, for improved durability and ease of care.



    Block pattern tyres (Continental 90/90-21M/C 545 and 150/70 B18M/C 70Q, rated at 180km/h and 160km/h respectively) are now approved by Honda for fitment to take full advantage of the Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ off-road abilities.



    3.2 Engine Management Electronics

    • Throttle By Wire (TBW) brings with it 3 rider modes to tailor engine character and traction
    • The riding modes are comprised of different levels of Power (P), Engine Braking (EB) and Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC)
    • HSTC now has 7 levels and OFF


    The Africa Twin Adventure Sports’ 998cc SOHC 8-valve parallel-twin engine’s 2018 upgrade sees it receive Throttle By Wire (TBW) plus riding modes and expanded Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC).



    The use of TBW greatly expands the choices available to the rider to manage engine output, feel and rear wheel traction to suit different riding conditions. Whereas the 2017 Africa Twin had 3 Levels of HSTC, plus OFF, the new system features 7 Levels – from Level 1, for aggressive riding off-road on block pattern tyres, to Level 7 for maximum sense of security on slippery, wet tarmac. It remains possible to turn HSTC completely OFF.



    There are also 3 levels of Power and Engine Braking available.



    In a set-up first used on the RC213V-S – Honda’s street legal version of its MotoGP racer – three riding modes offer pre-set combinations of each parameter, suitable to different riding environments and scenarios:



    TOUR employs the maximum Power (1), mid-range Engine Braking (2) and high HSTC (6).



    URBAN uses mid-level Power (2) and Engine Braking (2) and high HSTC (6).



    GRAVEL mode allows the lowest level of Power (3) and EB (3) with high HSTC (6).



    A fourth mode – USER – allows the rider to set and save his or her preferred combination of Power, EB and HSTC levels. Both riding mode and level of HSTC can be changed at anytime using the controls on the left hand switchgear.



    3.3 Engine


    • New intake design and exhaust aid mid-range response
    • New exhaust also designed to improve engine note
    • New lighter balance shaft weight
    • New lithium-ion battery saves 2.3 kg and enhances durability
    • Power is smooth and consistent, with linear torque delivery
    • Assist/slipper clutch helps upshifts and downshifts


    Alongside the new engine management electronics for 2018, the airbox now features a 20mm longer funnel length, matched with redesigned exhaust internals to significantly boost mid-range response and sound. The 2-1 downpipe now feeds gas flow through two catalysers (rather than one) into a simplified, smaller volume (4.6L to 4L) muffler that houses two chambers rather three.



    Peak power of 70Kw still arrives @ 7,500rpm, with 99Nm torque @ 6,000rpm. Bore and stroke are set at 92 x 75.1mm, with compression ratio of 10.0:1; the 270° phased crankshaft and uneven firing interval create the engine’s distinctive throb and feel for rear wheel traction.



    Good ground clearance – crucial to off-road performance – starts with a compact, short engine. So the crankcases are split vertically; the water pump is housed within the clutch casing with a thermostat integrated into the cylinder head. Manual and DCT versions of the engine share common crankcases with only minor external differences. The water and oil pumps are driven by the engine’s balancer shafts; for 2018 300g has been shaved from the balance weight, reducing inertia by 306g/cm2, further adding to the character and feel of the power delivery.



    Four-valve cylinder heads, fed by PGM-FI fuel injection, each employ twin spark plugs and dual and sequential ignition control for even combustion. Honda’s SOHC Unicam valve train is a feature of the CRF450R and the low-set position of the cast camshaft contributes to the compact nature of the cylinder head. The inlet valves are 36.5mm in diameter, the exhaust valves 31mm.



    The engine uses a semi-dry sump and in-tank lower crankcase oil storage. This allows a lower pan depth, reducing overall engine height. As the pressure-fed pump is located within the tank where it delivers its oil from, there is no need for a pressure-feed passage; again saving weight and space.



    Secondary vibrations are neutralised by the mutually reciprocating motion of the pistons, while primary inertial and coupling vibrations are cancelled by the use of biaxial balance shafts. The front balancer shaft uses two weights, the rear only a single weight in order to save weight.



    The aluminium clutch centre and pressure plate use ‘assist’ cams to ease upshift and downshift (with light lever feel) and ‘slipper’ cams for deceleration and downshifting. The six-speed gearbox uses ‘pierced’ shape dogs for 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th gear, allowing use of a smaller, lighter clutch. Oil gathering ribs on the main journal side of the primary gear ensure consistent lubrication for the gear, damper spring and primary sub-gear.



    The lightweight six-speed manual gearbox uses the same shift-cam design as found on the CRF450R to ensure positive changes, and is equipped with an aluminium assist slipper clutch.



    New for 2018 a lithium-ion battery is 2.3kg lighter than the lead unit of the 2017 Africa Twin, and offers greater longevity, both in terms of life and the ability to hold onto a charge when left.



    A quickshifter is available as an optional extra.



    3.4 Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT)

    • Super-fast, seamless gear changes in Manual Transmission (MT) or Automatic D mode
    • S mode (with 3 levels) revs higher and downshifts sooner, for aggressive riding
    • G switch improves rear wheel traction when off-road
    • Incline detection adapts shift pattern depending on road gradient


    Honda’s unique DCT delivers consistent, super-fast seamless gear changes, and very quickly becomes second nature in use. It uses two clutches: one for start-up and 1st, 3rd and 5th gears: the other for 2nd, 4th and 6th, with the mainshaft for each clutch located inside the other for compact packaging.



    Each clutch is independently controlled by its own electro-hydraulic circuit. When a gear change occurs, the system pre-selects the target gear using the clutch not currently in use. The first clutch is then electronically disengaged as, simultaneously, the second clutch engages.



    The result is a consistent, fast and seamless gear change. Furthermore, as the twin clutches transfer drive from one gear to the next with minimal interruption of the drive to the rear wheel, any gear change shock and pitching of the machine is minimised, making the change feel direct as well as smooth.



    The extra benefits of durability (as the gears cannot be damaged by missing a gear) impossibility of stalling, low stress urban riding and reduced rider fatigue add to the DCT’s appeal



    Three modes of operation are available. MT mode gives full manual control, allowing the rider to shift with the handlebar trigger control buttons. Automatic D mode is ideal for city and highway riding, and achieves optimum fuel efficiency. Automatic S mode offers three levels of sportier riding, as the ECU lets the engine rev a little higher before shifting up, and shifts down sooner when decelerating for extra engine braking.



    In either D or S mode, DCT offers immediate manual intervention if required – the rider simply selects the required gear using the up and down shift triggers on the left handlebar. At an appropriate time DCT seamlessly reverts back to automatic mode, depending on throttle angle, vehicle speed and gear position.



    DCT for the Africa Twin is also fully equipped to operate in an adventure environment, with off-road functionality enhanced by the G switch positioned on the right side of the instrument panel. Pushing the G switch in any riding mode improves traction and machine control by reducing the amount of clutch slip during gear changes.



    Further functionality for the DCT system comes in the form of incline detection, by means of which the gear shift pattern is adapted depending on the grade of an incline to provide optimum control.



    4. Accessories

    A full range of genuine Honda accessories are available for the CRF1000L Africa Twin Adventure Sports, including:



    Touring bags

    Rubber pillion footpegs

    DCT foot shifter

    Fog lamps

    Wheel stripes

    Alarm system.

    Centre stand

    Sump guard

    Two types of lower seat

    Quickshifter

    Tank Bag
    #88
  9. Nostop

    Nostop Been here awhile

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    These little clear wings and extra black plastic parts must be to improve airflowand reduce buffeting. Sure looks great in the 30th anniversary colour scheme :raabia ADD12D12-1CE3-439A-BDC8-90E32075E0AA.jpeg
    #89
  10. jmarleau

    jmarleau Been here awhile

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    Coming from a 2016 owner, I like it.

    The Good: Battery, Suspension, Rear Rack, Spokes, LCD display

    The "Why Bother": Rider Modes, Seat, Windscreen, Ride-by-wire
    #90
  11. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    I don't see the LDC display being an improvement. It's still negative. I'm short so the added suspension travel is a minus and the current travel is plenty for my road-biased needs. New rear rack would be nice, my spokes haven't rusted but stainless is a change for the better. Agree on the rider modes, DCT already has too many choices. Ride by wire is only worthwhile if cruise is offered. Which unbelievably Honda has skipped. The battery can be added later.
    #91
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  12. jmarleau

    jmarleau Been here awhile

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    Agreed, but I like the fact that is is mounted lower and is aimed upward in an effort to be better viewed while standing.
    #92
  13. Boxerbro

    Boxerbro Free Spirit

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    I really like the new African Twin sport and I’d be tempted in the future, but and this is a big BUT, I think Honda have lost the plot, if the predicted pricing is to be believed. I’ve just had a look at the new BMW 850 GS, specked with various packages. The AT Sport is predicted to cost £2000 more than the standard bike, putting it up at least to £14250 or more. A GS850 with virtually all boxes ticked, comes out at £12600, and that has esa suspension, full colour TFT display with multifunction wheel on handle bar, cruise control, LED headlights, tubeless rims, quick shifter, heated grips, rider modes, plus it on par power wise and it’s likely to be a big competitor to the AT.

    I know Honda won’t consider it a competitor and rethink its pricing, but I’d expect quite a few prospective buyers maybe looking at the value for money, you are getting with the BMW, compared to the AT. I love the look of the new African Twin Sport, but I’d be seriously tempted with the new BMW 850gs, it would be a big saving and a better spec bike! That’s before they bring a Adventure spec GS850 out!

    Honda, you best look at your pricing very carefully!
    #93
  14. ballisticexchris

    ballisticexchris Long timer

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    And you "well priced" BMW will be in the shop for repairs or broke down waiting for a flatbed while the Honda is riding into the sunset....

    If you need a cruise control to tour then you need to find another hobby.
    #94
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  15. James Adams

    James Adams Long timer Supporter

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    Ironically my Africa Twin is at the shop right now with a mystery electrical issue so instead I have been riding a BMW which has proven to be bulletproof. :rofl
    #95
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  16. Boxerbro

    Boxerbro Free Spirit

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    Why, when your travelling long distances on motorways, it’s great to switch the cruise control on and chill. The beauty of having it, you choose when you want to use it, I don’t see that as a negative, quite the reverse and judging by other comments, it’s something lots of riders want.

    Further more, why should I find another hobby, just because I like having cruise control, that’s a ridiculous statement. I’ve been riding motorcycles for almost 40 years now, I love it and I don’t intend to stop anytime soon. I ride on the road and I ride Trials as well. Unfortunately I don’t live in a country, that allows unlimited off-road space to ride, so most of my riding is on road. I wish I had access to the vast and beautiful off-road places America has to offer, but sadly not here in the uk.

    As to reliability, all bikes can have issues, as James has indicated above.
    #96
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  17. Maker_L

    Maker_L Adventurer

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    The added suspension travel is going to be nice for me potentially. My biggest worry now is that I tip toed the old seat when raised, that's a little disconcerting compared to what I'm used to. A real issue or something I should easily be able to get over soon? (never tried a bike where I couldn't have both feet down at neutral)
    #97
  18. WoodrowBDR

    WoodrowBDR Been here awhile

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  19. fatcuresmuscles

    fatcuresmuscles n00b

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    Maybe next summer after a few have been wrecked I can pick up the LCD for cheap off Ebay to replace the current one.
    #99
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  20. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    I have the Tripmaster so I guess I don't think about seeing the dash as much while standing (and I only stand when I have to, which isn't often ;-) . I wonder how the glare will be in the new position.