2019-2020 CB300R

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by cabanza, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. jcaljapan

    jcaljapan Ridin' in Japan

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    I'm new here and I recently bought a 2020 CB300R (CB250R here in Japan). Anybody know how to exactly install a Healtech SpeedoHealer V4 (SH-V4) on this bike? I have the universal wiring kit (SH-U01) and the speed sensor coupler is hard to get to. Supposedly it's on the left side of the bike on top of the engine. Does anybody have any resources or information on exactly how to install this device on my particular bike?
    20210928_160134_2.jpg
    20210925_201218.jpg 20210925_201235.jpg
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  2. jcaljapan

    jcaljapan Ridin' in Japan

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    I'm trying to install Speedo Healer V4 on my CB300R (2020) and just wondering if you know of any easier way to get to the speed sensor wires? I know your comment is really old, but looking for any help. I probably would want to sell this speedo healer, not really wanting to go through the trouble of installing this...
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  3. motorboy1

    motorboy1 Adventurer

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    Yes- the sensor is on top of the engine left side the first thing I would do is remove the tank cover that should give you a better picture if anything else needs to be removed it's a simple unplug replug you store the healer it self under the rear seat
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  4. strongbad

    strongbad Been here awhile

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    The speed sensor is located on the right side of the engine near the clutch. You should be able to locate the wires and access them without removing anything. It's not the VSS wires that are difficult to get to; it's the connector pair that's tough. I read through the installation instructions of the Speedo Healer V4 and they don't deal with the connector at all. Instead, they have you cut the VSS wires and splice their unit in. Ouch! That approach is unacceptable to me so I went to the trouble and expense of identifying the connectors and ordering them from Japan. There's a domestic supplier now that sells small quantities of the OEM connectors.

    In the end I found a way to get to the connectors and got my unit to work very nicely. It was a good project. I'm looking for another.
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  5. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Been here awhile

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    Did you install a 15 tooth sprocket?
  6. strongbad

    strongbad Been here awhile

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    yes. a couple years ago. I made a small speedo corrector to deal with the 7.1% change. I outlined the project earlier in the thread. I sold the original corrector to another forum member and developed a version 2 with circuit board improvements that made it easier to construct and program--plus an external time base for the microcontroller.
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  7. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Been here awhile

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    It's been so long that I've forgotten.
  8. BacasableFR

    BacasableFR Adventurer

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    You should do something like this

    IMG_1966.PNG

    I found theses concepts

    IMG_1969.PNG
    IMG_1972.PNG
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  9. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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  10. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Been here awhile

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    I bought some clip on bars and tried to put then on but it didn't work out. Cables, hoses, and wires made it not possible. The clip ons that I bought did not have a rise like the ones in the first pic that you posted. I could get some clip ons with a rise but then they would be no lower than the bars that I already have.

    In the first pic the clutch cable has been re-routed, otherwise it would be visible. The clutch cable and control pod would have to be detached to do this. I could have done this but I had a feeling in my gut that it just wasn't worth it. My skepticism overwhelmed my enthusiasm and I said screw it.

    Another possibility is re-locating the turn signals.

    I'm only out $40 and a couple of hours of elbow grease.
  11. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Been here awhile

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    It's possible that with that many mods that some engine modifications to increase power were done too.

    Either they had to fabricate all that body work or someone makes a kit.
  12. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Been here awhile

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    New Vans grips, $20, and new mirrors. $18. The mirrors are very nice, CNCd and powdercoated, tinted glass, much smaller than old mirrors. I screwed up one of the old mirrors while removing it. The grips have subtle bulge and aren't as fat as the Biltwell grips. I think I'll have better throttle control.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
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  13. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    I went to my local Honda dealer today to see if the had a cb1000r in stock (they had one for a few days but sold it a week ago) to get a feel for the ergos. They had two cb300r in stock and one cb650r that was sold so I couldn't sit on it.

    Anyway, sat on the 300 and was surprised at how great the fit was. I am 5'9", 145lbs.
    I liked the stiffer seat as well. I had a '17 250L Rally so I am generally familiar with how the engine feels though the bigger 300 in this lighter bike must make for a significant difference in how powerful it feels. The Rally was more or less fine power wise but the things that made it good on dirt roads made it suck handling wise on the street, like long mushy suspension travel, high seat height, and narrow 50/50 tires. Even going 75mph on the highway for a while wasn't bad. Engine revving pretty high but was smooth and knew the engine could sit there all day.

    This bike is definitely on my radar now as a second bike to my AT, or using it as my sole bike for mostly commuting on while I figure out what I want in a longer distance bike.

    If anyone has experienceoon this bike and a '17+ 250L I would be interested to hear your thoughts on how the two compare in feeling power wise.
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  14. Lee Dodge

    Lee Dodge Been here awhile Supporter

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    I had a 2017 and 2019 CRF250L before I bought the CB. I was always frustrated with 250 in stock form. There was a big hole in the powerband from about 4000 to about 5500 rpm. Any kind of headwind or hill meant you had to shift down a gear to maintain your speed. Both my bikes were purchased new and had the same engine characteristics. I purchased a CB300R last year and there is a night and day difference in engine performance. The CB makes good torque everywhere in the powerband and seems to have more power overall. No problem with hills or headwinds. You can feel a little more vibration in the seat and pegs at higher rpm due to the longer stroke, but there is less vibration in the bars due to the rubber bar mounts which the 250 lacks.
  15. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Been here awhile

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    Adam Waheed says he never remembered the 286cc motor pulling as well as it does in the CB300R.

    I am perfectly content with the power delivery.

    PS Adam tested all three CB300R, CB650R, and CB1000R. He wasn't so hot on the CB1000R, liked the CB650R, and really liked the CB300R.

  16. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    Yeah, plenty of positive youtube reviews out there. I can't stand that guy Adam though. He tested an older CB1000R but still, I can see how the 300 punches above its weight and makes a greater impression. I've never owned a naked bike and picking up one of these 300s might be a way for me to test the waters without risking too much financially.
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  17. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Been here awhile

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    I think it's all about expectations. The CB1000R was below his expectations, the CB650R met his expectations, but the CB300R exceeded his expectations.
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  18. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    It all depends on what your looking to get out of it. The 300R is a fantastic, albeit, not quick, sub 60mph bike.
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  19. GeoKrpan

    GeoKrpan Been here awhile

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    Yes it is, although I frequently go 70 and it does fine.
  20. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    My expectations are realistic. Looking for an easy to use, fuel efficient, fun bike for commuting and local rides. My positive experience with my 250L Rally, at least in terms of engine performance on road gives my good confidence in what to expect. It does need to be able to cruise reasonably comfortably at 75mph for short periods, which my 250L did so I expect it would be even easier on the CB.

    Reading through some of the older posts, going to a 15t seems like a good choice for a lighter rider like myself not concerned with maximum rates of acceleration.

    I'd also probably buy the Hepco Becker rear rack that replaces the rear seat and mount a top case to that.

    I really like my AT, it's set up very well, but it's tall and heavy and for running errands and commuting it becomes a handful. I haven't been inside a dealer for a couple of years and sitting on and handling the CB was a revelation. I need to see how my work situation pans out over the next month or so as where I work and what type of commute I have will matter in what bike makes the most sense. It's possible that I would just add the CB and keep the AT but I generally don't like having one bike sitting unridden. But if my wife wants me to have a bike that she can ride on also, the CB won't cut it on its own.
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