2019-2020 Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by cabanza, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. J.Mo

    J.Mo Adventurer

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    Indeed. Wish you all the best.
  2. Long Ride

    Long Ride Don't let up!

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    So sorry to hear that. My Dad went through that 12 years back and said he felt the same after the first 2 rounds of treatment. Swore he was not going back but then the doc said he could make adjustments to fine tune his treatments. Much, much better after that and he went on to live probably the best 10 more years of his life. Not my place to give advice but I hope it works as well for you and you can enjoy many more miles.
  3. racer

    racer Long timer

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    Thanks for the thoughts. I've been fighting this for almost five years. Most die of pancreatic cancer in less than a year, so I've been lucky. Losing so much weight and strength has led me to this bike since it is lighter than my previous Super Tenere and Africe Twin, so that's a plus. The CBX is such a pleasure, carefree and easy bike to ride. Suits me well, as I am just not the racey anymore. It's all good. Racer
    DaFoole, ag_streak, dereck74 and 3 others like this.
  4. emmi

    emmi Been here awhile

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    The forward clamp is tucked in and under the footpeg. not worried about that. I have been thinking of ways to orient the rear clamp. It's current position is the most logical that wont catch my boot or the swing arm but leaving it vulnerable to rocks and debris. a big part of me wants to just weld it together and eliminate the risk of a failing clamp.
  5. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    I'd just cut the threaded tail of the bolts off flush with the nuts and call it good.

    Jx
    78er likes this.
  6. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    ^^^^^ what she said
  7. kickertwo

    kickertwo Adventurer

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  8. sscardefield

    sscardefield Adventurer

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    I plan on running the stock bars for the time being, but there is a good chance that I will swap them out eventually with some Renthal High bars (instead of just running risers). Does anybody know if the Barkbusters specifically for the 2019 (BHG-074) will also fit the Renthal's without any adapters or issues?
  9. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    You will almost certainly need to buy a thinner pair of expanding inserts as the walls of the [aluminium] Renthals are much thicker [4mm] than the OEM steel bars the BHG-074 kit is designed for. The rest of the fitting kit will transfer over.

    BarkBusters sell pretty much all their hardware as spare parts, so when the time comes, drop them an email and ask which insert part numbers you'll need (they are basically the same inserts you get with the BHG-152 universal fat-bar kit).

    Jx
  10. J.Mo

    J.Mo Adventurer

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    As said before keep in mind that in some countries they won't sell the parts seperately... Especially in Europe.

    Still many kilometers left on my OEM Dunlop tyres but the new Mission seems what I'm after at and will probably be my new tyre. Only want to read some comments about how they behave on wet tarmac but I expect it will be fine. Ran de Mitas E07 and tkc80 before on other bike and while this combination gives a lot more traction and confidence off road, the trade off for the road was just too big for me. Sadly I live in a country where it is extremely difficult to do off pavement riding due to regulations and lack of unpaved road in general. These missions may just be what people like me are after.
  11. Long Ride

    Long Ride Don't let up!

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    Have we heard from others that have 'dropped' their 500X 5-6 times...or more? If you you are willing to share I'd like to hear your story. What conditions, crashbars, etc. How did it fair and how was it CG wise to pick up? I expect to step-off this thing once or twice in a days ride if any technical trails are involved...kinda like JMo did on the Rubicon but with much less style and grace. Been riding a CRF250L on trails and some backroads with my buds on similar bikes but the longer distance trips are calling my name. Decisions, decisions...
    ag_streak likes this.
  12. jojojones

    jojojones Been here awhile

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    it's gone down 3 times. no crash bars other than RR skid plate.

    1. parked on grass and flash flood came through when I was gone and it tipped over hitting ground, broke tip off clutch lever...in fact I never found it....went in to the ground. The kiickstand went in to the ground, snapped the left front blinker....(big fail by honda not to simply make blinkers flex)

    2. tough uphill all rocks bike hit a rock on left side of RR skid plate and took a substantial gouge out of the side bar....went down maybe 5 mph, blinker broke again, tank got minimal scratch and grey plastic piece got some big scratches from other rocks...not too bad. It was easy to pick up compared to my 17 wee.

    3. went down fairly soft while attempting a muddy rut with oem tires. Hit rocks and dirt on right side. no damage. Slow speed fall.

    My way of looking at this is I do not want the extra weight of crash bars and will deal with the consequences. The RR skid plate does well to protect the lower part though.
    ag_streak, JMo (& piglet) and J.Mo like this.
  13. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    What he said ^^^^

    Although the fairing panels are a little wider on the 2019 bike compared to the previous generation, they are still pretty narrow, and as long as you've got some strong hand-guards fitted, the handlebars tend to take the brunt of a fall/drop at low speed anyway.

    Sliding down the road might be another question, but in all honesty, if that happens, you've probably got more to worry about than a few scuffs on your panels!

    As Jojo suggests - 'crash-bars' primarily add weight and bulk to your bike - something you really want to try and avoid if riding off-road, particularly on a larger heavier machine [than a dirt bike] in the first place.

    Personally I'm bemused that 'adventure' bikers feel there is a need to fit this kind of thing to their bikes at all (in much in the same way as people fitted bull-bars to their 4x4s in the 1990s...) - when the reality is, you're unlikely to need them during the typical riding you do on this sort of bike, and that there are so many variables anyway if you do end up dropping your bike off-road. For example, I've actually found the best 'protection' is my Giant Loop Coyote bag with a tent in one side and a sleeping bag in the other - it essentially works like boat-fenders and helps cushion any impact towards the rear of the bike, including the exhaust.

    Ultimately, I would always recommend that if you're a novice to off-road riding in general, then it always pays to learn and practice the techniques to stay upright in a controlled environment first.

    Jx
    32dgrz, rideforzen and KevinMcCall like this.
  14. afordableperformance

    afordableperformance Been here awhile

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    Just go to PG.48 post number 959 and get the handguards for the aluminum bars from the start, use the hose on your stock bars, don't use the hose when you switch to the aluminum bars, no additional parts needed other than 2 small pieces of hose.
    JMo (& piglet) likes this.
  15. Long Ride

    Long Ride Don't let up!

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    Great input and advice. Thanks. Mostly what I find is that my 'drops' are on more technical trail sections when I find myself having to 'step off' rather than any high speed crashes. On the CRF250L I just kinda let it go and get out of the way...scuffs don't bother me and blinkers fix-up ok with electrical tape. I'm struggling most with the more technical trail riding I'd be giving up but at my age that may be a good thing... hmmmm....
  16. fastnlight

    fastnlight Repeat Offender

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    Update on the lowering peg kit. Noticed some squeaking in the back end while moving it in the garage. Found the lowering bracket for the rear brake cylinder pushed it close enough to the swingarm that it was lightly rubbing.

    I will need to modify it slighly for just a bit more clearance by grinding down the bolt studs to shorten them. The kit (brake portion) does not fit the 2019 model in the same way it fits the earlier versions.

    And foot room for my right heel is worse, not better. That is another thing to tweak....

    Greg
  17. Falang

    Falang Adventurer

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    Not only are they heavy, some crash bars and skid plates weaken a CB500X and may end up costing the owner more than replacing all the Honda bits when you crash.

    The problem with crash bars and skid plates is that the CB500X does not have a frame surrounding the engine, unlike, say, the Africa Twin, so most crash bars attach to the highly-stressed engine mounting bolts. In order to install crash bars, Honda's high-tensile engine mounting bolts need to be replaced with custom high-tensile bolts which have the identical threaded length at the bottom of the bolt, but, say, a 5 mm longer shoulder at the top of the bolt (if, say, the crash bar lug is 5 mm thick). High-tensile bolts with those dimensions are difficult to find, so some accessory makers don’t provide replacement bolts of exactly the right dimensions and of high-tensile strength. Or worse, they re-use the Honda bolts, which are too short to mount crash bars and so the threads in the engine case eventually strip.

    A few years ago I bought a used 2013 CB500X. Just weeks after I bought the bike, I was riding it hard to keep up with a macho pack of 1200 cc BMWs. While riding at full throttle, the lower right engine mounting bolt snapped off, resulting in hand-numbing vibration. I limped to a Honda dealer and had it repaired. Six months later, the lower left engine mounting bolt snapped off. Again I limped to a Honda dealer and had it repaired. I removed the "Oyabun" crash bars and threw them out. Both bolts had to be drilled out and replaced with high-tensile bolts which were long enough to take nuts on the other end. If an upper bolt had snapped off, that simple repair would have been impossible. Honda Bangkok told me that they see many CB500Xs come in with snapped-off or stripped-out engine mounting bolts and with cracked engine casings, in every case caused by the installation of crash bars and skid plates on the bike. One guy installed a skid plate, took his bike off-road, and--no doubt emboldened by his skid plate--came down on a rock. Instead of absorbing the blow by breaking the (cheap) oil pan if he had no skid plate, one of the skid plate bolts cracked his lower engine casing at mounting point; the cost of his repair was almost as much as the value of his bike. Beware any accessories which could impair the integrity of the bike, especially anything which is attached to the engine mounting bolts. What the doctors say about their patients applies to mechanics and their bikes, “First, do no harm.”
  18. fastnlight

    fastnlight Repeat Offender

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    Tore into the motowork peg lowering brake bracket and starting counting up the modifications needed to revise the fit for the components on the 2019 right peg assembly. Decided to just try with out and was able to get the same brake pedal position by nearly maxing out the stock adjustment. Works for me. Lesson learned, don't bother with the brake repositioning bracket for the 2019 model, it doesn't fit without serious modification of the brake assembly. If more adjustment was needed, it would not be too hard to make your own smaller riser plates with washers and some flat stock plus two bolts.

    Greg
  19. jojojones

    jojojones Been here awhile

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    this should be a sticky...VERY good stuff!!!

    The RR bash plate is a less than perfect fit on the 19s and could be tweaked$$ by a metal fab person to get back some lost clearance...but...as per the above...it's mounting imho is the best and it is likely the strongest of them all. The new adaptor brackets in the front certainly make the removal much easier not messing each time with the engine bolts.
  20. jojojones

    jojojones Been here awhile

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    these fit on 19s and help
    http://www.knightdesignllc.com/Prod...500X/Honda-CB500X-1-Wide-Front-Foot-Pegs.html