2019-2021 Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by cabanza, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. KennyV

    KennyV Been here awhile Supporter

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    No problem, all's good. We lost power also. We've been camping since yesterday morning :)
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  2. aliensr

    aliensr n00b

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    I plan to do the same thing, ie putt around Ontario a bit this year. Just put a deposit down on a '21 CB500X here in Toronto. Really like the bike after taking a look at one this weekend. Probably will drive it home sometime in March...I plan to do some fishing this year (@70 I don't need a license). Ironically, I'm a dual US-Cdn citizen and can't cross the border, lol. cheers
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  3. aliensr

    aliensr n00b

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    I'd like to get a rack for a top box (probably a decent sized Givi) for my new '21 500x. almost went into anaphylactic shock when I saw Honda's price here in Toronto, $577 + $52 for base + 13% tax. So what's a decent rack at a decent price? I imagine I would need some sort of mounting plate for the Givi also. Would appreciate any pointers on this. cheers. I really don't see myself going offroad with my bike, mostly city driving + short road trips. The top box would be for rain gear, secure locking of my jacket/helmet, etc. Initially I will be locking my helmet to the bike with a cable. cheers
  4. fastnlight

    fastnlight Tire Tester

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  5. Cal

    Cal Long timer

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    SAM_2670.JPG

    I used the above mentioned Givi mounting bars and cut a piece of aluminum to bolt a pelican case to. Givi makes a universal top plate case adaptor also.
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  6. sawride

    sawride Been here awhile Supporter

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    I have the GIVI mounting arms, a monokey top plate, and a V46 top case on my 2015 (I believe the back half of our bikes are the same). I have a few pictures of the installation at the link below. Note they really are two arms so you need a top plate of some sort to make it useable. In picture 6 & 7 you can see what they call a universal monokey top plate on the carport floor from a R1100RT I used to have. It’s flat and would be more useful if you sometimes want to strap something to the rack instead of using the top case.
    Pictures: https://sawride.smugmug.com/CB500X-Farkels/
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  7. BarryB

    BarryB Been here awhile Supporter

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    Hey sawride, I have a 2010 R1200RT I am trying to unload for a 2021 CB500X. Any regrets for the big HP step down? I'm 70 and not doing any road touring anymore and just want to mess around the TX hill country.
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  8. sawride

    sawride Been here awhile Supporter

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    I’ve only been to hill country once, quite a while ago on a 2004 650 VStrom. I think the 500X would be great for riding around there. I’ve ridden the 500X up in north Georgia, the BRP, Maggie Valley area, etc and it is great. You’ll be twisting the throttle a little harder but the bike doesn’t mind it a bit. In a lot of ways the 500X reminds me of a slightly downsized 650 VStrom. I also had a 2013 650 VStrom when I bought the CB500X and ended up selling the VStrom because I preferred the 500. One thing I did do to the 500X was install the Rally Raid level 1 suspension (stock height) because I found the stock suspension very harsh riding. Of course after the RT most anything feels harsh in comparison. If it helps any for reference I’m 69.
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  9. BarryB

    BarryB Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks for the quick reply. Just what I wanted to know. I don’t mind twisting it a little. It makes it seem like your going a little faster than you might be! I think age is revealing because it makes you start looking at things differently.
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  10. lesmeister

    lesmeister One of the OLD Farts Supporter

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    Warning! Probably NOT PC, but that’s life!

    A report on installation of the following:

    Andreani Misano Cartridge Kit • Ohlins Shock • Scorpion Serket Taper Titanium Silencer • Fork Gaiters for Yamaha Bolt

    Winter in the NC hills is pretty wet and cold this year, but have managed to get in some miles, so here is the promised a report on the suspension work and muffler.

    Suspension First
    Supplied by Fast Bike Industries (211 Duncan Hill Road, Hendersonville, NC 28792 • 828-435-0125)

    Upgraded to the Andreani Misano Cartridge kit for the forks, this is a closed cartridge type product. Quite impressed and satisfied with the improvement in ride and handling. After reinstalling the fork tubes and shock went by FBI for them to check out my installation, at the same time David made an adjustment on the fork compression and rebound which made a noticeable improvement in the ride, especially on rough surfaces.

    Ohlins Shock (made in Thailand, excellent workmanship, very high quality product):

    This appears to be the first Ohlins shock for the 2019 and later model bikes in the USA. Believe a version of this shock may have been available in other countries for some time.

    WOW! What a difference! Thought the fork work was good, DAMM! This bike is so smooooooth now, feel like I can add an extra 100 miles on a days ride and still not be as fatigued.

    Turn in and transitions are much more decisive and communitive. Considering there is only about 6” of total travel front/rear, both the forks and shock do an excellent job of controlling big hits that normally would have the stock suspension banging on the stops. This allows you to hold a line with much less effort, even on rough paved surfaces, without feeling like you are fighting for control while putting a butt clenching a hole in the seat. Handling is much crisper and very neutral, very light and flickable.

    On unpaved roads I’ve been able to ride, the control and ride motions are much smoother. Can’t discourse on any really rough surfaces due to the wet conditions. Many roads around here are underwater, just above water, washed out and/or muddy. My age and tire choice do not engender the sprit of adventure you younger bucks might have.

    Overall would the describe the ride as very smooth, flowing and fluid feeling, with good tactile feedback. Given the wide range of adjustability available, feel you could easily set the bike up to suit your riding conditions and weight. The key is to make sure to know what you want and convey that to whoever you are purchasing your hardware from. David at Fast Bike Industries was quite thorough in questioning me about what I expected from the upgrade, and seems to have pretty much ‘nailed’ it given the limitations of the existing setup and price point he had to work with.

    Installation was straightforward, everything fit, however the top shock bolt is a bear to feed through all of the wiring and cable spaghetti. NOTE: If you have installed a DENALI SoundBomb horn and mount, it will need to be relocated/replaced as the Ohlins remote preload adjuster uses the same mounting location. Ended up replacing mine with a pair of Hella Supertones I had on hand, they are actually louder that the Denali, and I was able to fit them on the bike where they can be heard and not obstructing anything, including me.

    Fork Gaiters
    Had a number of suggestions, but after looking at all of the options available at the time, felt the Fork Gaiters for Yamaha Bolt / R-Spec 2014-2020 • Item: P677140 SKU: 1598875 • 41mm/1.6in x 62mm/2.4in x 190mm/7.5in • $38.94+ship <https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/yamaha-fork-gaiters-bolt-r-spec-2014-2019?sku_id=1598875> were the best. Look good on the bike, like an OEM product. Still looking into the ones used for the Honda Rebel 500, they might be an option. The Bolt parts are bit more expensive that some of the other options, but are OEM quality and snugly fit 41mm fork tubes and 62mm fork lowers. They are about 6 1/2 to 7" long, relaxed before installation, and don’t bunch up and blow out when compressed. Did relieve the area around the raised fork seal protectors on the fender to prevent any rubbing/binding between the gaiter and plastic.

    Shock Protection
    David at Fast Bike Industries suggested that I not use a shock cover for my type of riding. His experience is that they tend to hold dirt and grit in the cover which can damage the shock rod seal faster. Feels it is better to be able to wash the dirt off an open shock. The CB500X has pretty fair protection for the shock, so I elected to follow his advice. He did say that a curtain type protector might be helpful if I were to be riding in very muddy conditions a lot. Will keep an eye on the shock area and see if more protection is warranted.

    Scorpion Serket Taper Titanium Silencer
    Over the Thanksgiving Holiday saw that DEMON TWEEKS <https://www.demon-tweeks.com/us/scorpion-serket-taper-silencer-satin-titanium-sleeve-scrrha189teo/> had this on sale, but it would not be delivered for at least three weeks. Had not dealt with these folks before, but took a chance and place the order. Delivered price was about what RR charges for the SS version. Very pleased with the service, came extremely well packaged with all paperwork necessary for import if needed. Arrived just before Christmas, and I put it on when I replaced the shock. No fitting/mounting problems, went on/off as easily as the stock system, plus it saves about five pounds. Would have ordered the SS from RR, but this was a better deal. Got this to give me more room when standing on the pegs, with the stock muffler my heel kept hitting the muffler guard and forcing my toe in towards the engine, this corrects that problem. NOTE: The 2019 and later models use a different part number that the earlier CBX bikes.

    Don’t know if rerouting the cables when I replaced the fork tubes, the new muffler, or a combination of both made the difference, but the throttle control and bottom end torque are much better. It is pretty close to the same as far a sound, maybe a bit louder, not objectionable, with a little more overrun burble. All in all quite pleasing. Again, an expensive upgrade, but given all of the good results, well worth the cost.


    No, what I did was not inexpensive, but all of it worked the first time, and now I can spend my time riding and not trying to figure out what else needs to be done.

    Yes, there are ways to improve the ride/handling/performace for less, and there are ways to improve it beyond what I have done. It always comes down to time and money. You are going to spend more of one or the other for improvements, just depends on which you have the best chance of being blessed with.

    For some of us unfortunates, we will end up spending both of more in the elusive chase for a better suspension, brakes, engine…..etc setup. Please don’t ask how I know.

    The smart person learns from their mistakes.
    The wise person learns from the mistakes of others.

    Well folks, I’ve reached the stage of being as SMART as I want to be!
    So thanks and keep posting all of that hard earned and costly knowledge.
    Wiser is so much easier that way.

    PS: Some may ask “What about the new ‘SMART’ suspension available on some OEM bikes, and now beginning to show up in the aftermarket?

    It is stunning technology! BUT! It is technology! For some applications it is a remarkably desirable choice, however for smaller, lighter, bikes I question the need. And YES, I have ridden bikes with these features.

    First, most bikes in the CB500X category are more commonly used as ARPR (All Roads All Purpose) bikes, more options come at the cost of more weight and complexity. Both drive up the purchase price and cost of ownership. Furthermore these bikes are where you hone your riding skills. I would much rather see the OEMs offer options for these bikes that would allow a purchaser to get improved standard suspension, better braking and fit/comfort items, than plow the R&D money into super-sophisticated electronics controlling all aspects of the ride.

    Check out this article.
    Simplify. And Add Lightness - To add performance, sometimes all you need is less weight. ~ By Kevin Cameron February 18, 2021 <https://www.cycleworld.com/story/bi...SK-1GRsfQ-1c-16ED-1c-1GSI1m-l5jXDzi7GE-2FpwWw>

    Don’t know about you, but I prefer to ride the/my bike, and not have some e-tech person sitting at a desk attempting to make it safe for me to be stupid!

    Now it you will excuse me, its a rare February day, 60ºF and sunny outside! I'M GOING RIDING!

    RIDE OFTEN AND RIDE SAFE! . . . . . . . . .’hpdl’ (herr professor doktor lesmeister)

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  11. Cal

    Cal Long timer

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    A simple rubber flap can protect your shock SAM_2740.JPG
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  12. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

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    Yep, just use 3M dual lock (name fixed) on a piece of flexible plastic such as found in the bottom of a Woolworths shopping bag and attach it by the 3M to the black plastic ABS housing. Had mine on for 7 years and never came off or needed replacing,. Makes an excellent front mudflap also!
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  13. sheath

    sheath Been here awhile

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    The perfect reason to visit Australia! :-)
  14. Laconic

    Laconic No Knee, No Needle

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    Thanks for the writeup, @lesmeister , I've been waffling on whether to do anything about the suspension on this thing and a datapoint other than the most common one is helpful.
  15. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Bike looks great Les - I bet those cartridges are nice (I've ridden an NC750X with Matris cartridges, and they were an impressive upgrade for the price).

    I would take issue with your man regarding the shock protection though - the sock type of cover goes around the spring, keeping any dirt well away from the main shaft even if the cover itself is wet/dirty (it also pays to remove it and give it a clean every so often too, hence the velcro) - but I appreciate if you don't want that type of cover, then a flap of some kind as other people have suggested will also help to stop any stones and dirt hitting the shock shaft - it's a nick in the chrome that will start to cause a leak rather than dust and debris itself.

    Jx
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  16. KennyV

    KennyV Been here awhile Supporter

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    I like the idea of the the flap to protect the rear shock, especially with the "3M kliplok". I was thinking about a shock sock but that would be another maintenance item, needing to be removed for cleaning periodically. Unfortunately it looks like we don't have "kliplok" here in US, but we do have 3M dual lock which I assume is basically the same. The problem is I don't see a good place to stick the dual lock for attaching a flap on my 2020. I guess I'll have to come up with plan B.
  17. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    I really wouldn't worry about the sock 'maintenance' - I take mine off once, maybe twice a year at most - basically every time I change the oil as part of a general service. I have many tens of thousands of miles on these bikes with no issues.

    Jx
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  18. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

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    Name fixed in original post.
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  19. Laconic

    Laconic No Knee, No Needle

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    Life is OK sometimes.

    upload_2021-2-25_17-35-9.png
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  20. chris4652009

    chris4652009 Been here awhile

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    Service costs..............

    My lovely little bike is due it's 4000mile/annual service next month, I rang my local dealer to be surprised that they want £250! That seems a little steep for what it basically draining out the oil and refilling with fresh then a visual inspection and put a spanner on various fasteners to check all is tight.......they don't change the oil filter or air filter!!!!
    As I understand it, here in the UK the bike has to be serviced by a franchised dealer otherwise the warranty will be void. Had that not been the case, I'd do it myself (as I do with my others plus our cars), very frustrating as I really don't want to lose the warranty.

    my question is:
    Is the servicing price set/fixed by Honda? or is it left to each dealer to charge whatever they like?

    Thank you in advance