2019 first Baja trip with trailer that got solo

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by duggram, Apr 13, 2019.

  1. duggram

    duggram Happy to be Retired Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    581
    Location:
    Truth or Consequences, NM
    I’ve been making attempts to find someone to do a Baja ride for a couple of years without success. I’m 68, retired and divorced from Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. I’m not a bad rider and I can take care of my own bike. I have friends that want to ride Baja with me but we just can’t get the schedule worked out. This year a separate group of four went, I believe it was late Jan and early Feb. I knew three of them but they wanted to keep their group size to four, so I was out for that group. I kept seeing posts from that group talking about the cold weather, something to remember. Looking through different forums on ADVrider I found a semi-retired guy that was looking for someone to travel with. I got a couple of my friends to agree to travel with us, but for a number of reasons they had to drop out. So it was that I would meet up with a stranger in El Centro on Friday March 23. On the recommendation of a friend that couldn’t make the trip I called the Motel 6 there and talked to the manager. They would watch our vehicles if we stayed the first and last night of our trip.

    I talked a few times with my new partner on the phone and we exchanged multiple PM’s, text, and email msgs. He had traveled in Baja last year with a father and son, so he had Baja experience. I’d never done anything like this before so I thought we were going to be good and we moved forward. The first day it took me way longer than I wanted to pack and we were about noon getting away from the motel. It was lunch time so we ended up at a famous In and Out Burger, which I had never seen before. They’re a lot like a Blake’s Lotaburger in New Mexico.

    I better mention now that I was brining along a Sherpax trailer behind my ’18 701 Husky. Sounds like a disaster in the making but it really wasn’t. The partner has a trailer he pulls behind a Goldwing, so he was a little accepting.
    01Preparing to load.jpg
    The first day the partner went on about this being our vacation and we had no reason to rush. We’re going to slow down and enjoy the trip. Sounds good to me! I said that I had up to five weeks for this trip and wouldn’t mind staying that long. But first we had to find insurance for the partner because he didn’t want to buy online pre-trip. Partner was a person that likes saving money and only bought two weeks of insurance. I had a year. He also wanted to exchange some dollars for pesos. On advice from my friends with experience it would be better to get peso out of the ATM’s in Baja. Once we got all of that taken care of we crossed into Mexicali, which was a pretty rapid process. I was very interested in looking at Mexicali, which gave me a similar feeling to visiting Kharbarovsk, Russia. Sort of what I think of as third world, but not a bad thing. It was a great feeling that gave me a sense of adventure. I was a happy rider.

    Our plan was to make it to San Felipe the first day, so we took off down highway 5 and pulled into town just before sundown. At the Calimax grocery store I found two ATMs. One was only in Spanish and didn’t have any pesos anyway. They also had a Santander ATM which brightened me up because I recognize them from traveling in Canada. Sure enough it was also in English. I got 6,000 pesos twice out of my credit union, which cost me $301 plus $4.50 per transaction.

    After this the partner wanted to go somewhere to eat and he remembered an open-air café on the boardwalk. Once we got there we found out that this was Cancer Walk 2019 weekend and the place was packed, and supposedly the motels too. Here I had the shrimp tacos that I had been hearing about for years, and they are every bit as good as their reputation.
    02 music on the boardwalk.png
    We got separate rooms because I don’t see any reason to give up my sleep to a snoring deaf person. Partner said he never heard his snoring because he just took his hearing aids out. My room had a funny smell and there wasn’t any hot water, but the view was great. A little disappointing but I didn’t mind since I was finally in Baja!
    03 San Felipe.jpg
    It didn’t take long to pack this morning. Once we were ready to go the partner said, “We don’t have time for breakfast. Lets go.” Wow, big attitude change. For some reason we had to be in Bahia de Los Angeles by night fall.

    The ride down 5 to Gonzaga was outstanding in many places. The highway storm damage was there but it was easy enough to recognize and take the detours. I can’t remember ever before riding on an ocean coast and I was itching to stop for some pictures, but partner was in a hurry. He was riding a big, extremely loud KTM v-twin and enjoyed riding fast. However, I was way back and didn’t see any reason to not stop and take some island and coastline pictures, which really didn’t turn out as good as being there. Partner was waiting for me at a bridge that was closed. He proclaimed how he has always been a risk taker and crossed the bridge, that really did have a couple of sections that looked like they were ready to complete falling. I took the detour and rode by a beach with a few campers on it that looked great! Too bad we didn’t have time to do a little exploring.
    05 Coastal Islands.jpg
    About lunchtime we made it to Gonzaga Bay. We got gas from the Pemex there and sure enough they didn’t have any change, a situation I had heard about before. I didn’t mind because for me it was only a few pesos, like 10 cents. From the gas station we rode down to the Hotel, which by the way is supposedly five doors down from Malcolm Smith’s house on the beach. Lunch was more outstanding shrimp tacos and two beers. Lunch was so cheap it seemed insignificant.

    06 Gonzaga Bay Tacos.jpg
    07 Gonzaga Bay from hotel.jpg
    08 Gonzaga Hotel from beach.jpg

    The road was good for a little ways more then it got really rough. We came to a T in the road. I said we should follow the tracks leading to the right. Partner was very insistent that we go left. Of course we went left and ended up at Coco’s Corner and would have to back track to the T and follow the other tracks. At least it was another chance for a beer. We also met some very nice foreigners on rented BMWs, GS of course. When we left I lost my bag off my trailer, which really surprised me because it was held on with cargo straps that should not have loosened up. This was the only time I lost something. Anyway partner and the BMW riders rode on ahead. I finally caught up with them where 5 meets up with highway 1. Everyone took off again and I rode solo the rest of the way to Bahia de Los Angeles (BLA).

    When I got to town I saw a couple of riders and asked if they had seen the partner. No, they had not and they said I could probably stay at their place if I needed it. It was getting dark so I told them I’d come back if I couldn’t find partner. I found partner sitting at a roadside taco stand on the south side of town. He told me that he had been there only 5 minutes, that he rode 55 mph the whole way since seeing me last and didn’t understand why he never saw me until now. I had switched my instruments over to kilometers, and had ridden 100 to 130 km/hr the whole way. I’m not a math major but something doesn’t seem right here.

    Anyway, partner had time to find a place for us to stay on the beach, which was managed by this great old man named Kerry. He really was good to us during our three-day stay on the beach. Kerry also gave me a copy of the Baja Handbook written by Joe Cummings. That book is full of a lot of useful information for any traveler in Baja. Just a great deal for me to have it.

    09 BLA beach camp.jpg
    The first day in town we spent most of it with Juan Espinoza from Ensenada and owner of Espinoza Racing. He’s a former quad racer that has done the Baja 1000 and other races. He is currently switching over to cars. He is sponsored by Red Bull and had so many war stories to share. He too was a great person. He was here selling his imported goods that he brings back from the USA. It’s amazing how may tourists come to Baja without their sporting gear (snorkel, fins, fishing, whatever, etc). Juan makes a good living this way. Next he was moving down to Loreto, which is one place I definitely wanted to visit. However, partner said there was no way he would visit Loreto because he had seen it last year and thought it would be a waste of time.

    The second day I locked the trailer to this fish displaying rack and we took off for the road to Mission San Borja, which isn’t far out of BLA. The mission road was about 40 KM long and pretty rocky, but the landscape was something special. I had a great time on the 701 and the only way partner could pass me was to feign the buddy system. I was supposed to stop and wait for him, and he would say go or wait up. Sure enough the first time I stopped to wait on him he flew by me. It didn’t take long to pass him back on that heavy twin. When we got to the mission and sat at the covered tables, partner says, “So you really can ride.” Just like anyone else.
    10 road to mission.jpg 11 road to mission.jpg
    The Mission was an interesting place. Partner didn’t want to take the tour but I did. It was founded in 1762 and was made of hand carved stone arches. The tour guide seemed like a young man but he was a little older. He has seventh generation ownership of the mission and is a part time archeology professor at one of the universities on the Baja. It was definitely worth my time to see it.
    #1
  2. duggram

    duggram Happy to be Retired Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    581
    Location:
    Truth or Consequences, NM
    13 Mission hand carved.jpg
    We were at the mission for abut an hour and a half and partner left his key on and now had a dead battery. I had left all of my starting accessories back at camp. There was a nice couple visiting from Mendocino, CA that consented to pull the big twin to bump start it. Partner couldn’t get the wheel to stop sliding and turn over the motor. He started yelling at me to run up on them and jump on the back of his bike. Sure in my riding boots I’m going to run that fast and leap up in the air so I can land on the back of that bike when they went by.

    That KTM has its battery behind the skid plate. Partner resisted it because it would be too much work but did eventually take the skid plate off and it took a while to get enough charge in the battery, but he got the bike started. I helped him get his stuff back together and he then took off down the road. He said he would go slow, but he didn’t. I rode solo for what seemed like quite a ways until I came upon these two horse mounted cowboys. They gave me a lot of room to go by and I got real slow so I wouldn’t make noise. The rider on my right looked like he was itching to start a fight so I put my head down moved on. When I got a couple of miles down the road I saw a young steer tied to a cactus with rope. Just behind this scene was the partner pulled over and taking off his gear. He was going back to cut the steer loose. I stopped him and asked, “Do you know what those cowboys are going to think when they come back for their property and it’s gone?” He finally wised up and took off again. The next time I saw him he was stopped with a good Samaritan that was fixing his rear tire. Partner was riding on Shinko big block tires and they were stiff, plus they were looking pretty warn down although they were new to start the trip. I think one reason that tire wore down so fast was that partner was always full throttle leaving a stop. Once that tire was fixed we rode on. I was pretty tired and my friends will tell you I slow down when I’m tired. At least partner waited at the highway before taking off again for camp.

    14 BLA camp at night.jpg
    When we got back to camp we got dinner at the taco shack and then sat on the beach for one more beer watching the lights on the water. That’s when partner says he has to fess up to me. He’s on medication for his personality issues. I’m a retired RN and I know exactly what that means. In the past I worked my way through law school as the psych unit night charge nurse on weekends. He had been telling me how he had tried out with a couple of groups for a Baja trip and they disinvited him. Things were starting to add up. Also about this time we’re talking about Seattle. I mention how funny it was to work in Seattle in the 90’s for dot com’s and all the worthless stock options they would give out. Partner doesn’t understand stock options and gets a little upset. Thinks I’m bragging about all the money I have. If you knew me, you’d laugh at this. So partner pulls out his phone and starts showing me email messages from his stockbroker outlining the approximate $500K he currently has in his account. I never was able to get him to understand what stock options are.
    15 BLA sunrise.jpg
    This sunrise was only there for a minute or so. I leaned out of my tent to get this on the mini iPad. Then I reached for my phone for another pic, but it was gone and not as impressive. Sure was something great to wake up to. Every morning I would use my tiny stove to boil water in less than a minute and pour the water into my cup with some old Starbucks French roast that was 5 years expired. It was great with fresh oranges, bananas and apples. I can’t wait to go back!!

    One of the best experiences of my trip happened the next morning. We were camped next to the municipal boat ramp and there is this great place to eat on the north side of the ramp. It was a short walk to breakfast. Our last morning partner came along, but normally he would go somewhere else so we always ate alone. But this morning we get a table on this outstanding open-air patio next to two other guys. They overheard us talking and we started bantering between tables. They finally asked us to join them and we laughed so hard for about two hours. I’ll remember this episode for a long time. They were Polish immigrants to Canada and traveling on Honda singles. One was a happily out of work oil field hand and the other was a commercial pilot. I’m a former amateur Alaska bush pilot and we got along great.

    When we get back to camp and start packing up we notice a snorkel diver working along the water in front of us. When he gets out of the water he walks up to show us his catch. Partner buys a large shell that is a scallop, which he was a bit excited about. He took it to one of the cafes and had them cook it for him. He said it was very good. The diver opened a clam and asked if I would try it. I did. It was so ugly out of its shell but it did taste good. It’s all part of the experience.

    16 My clam.jpg
    About knives in Baja. The day before I left to crossed the border to go home a local told me to put my knives in with my kitchen kit. That way it would look appropriate and not as much like a weapon. I never did get asked about it, searched or pulled over for an inspection.
    17 Packing up at BLA.jpg
    One improvement I need to make to my travel kit is to organize with some smaller containers so that packing up goes a little faster.

    That morning we were heading to San Ignacio. Partner was thinking that this would be as far south as he would go. One thing he repeated many times was that he didn’t want to go to Guerrero Negro to see the whales. Sounds good to me. It got real windy after a long boring ride on highway 1 when we got to this military installation with a Pemex just before the right turn to Guerrero Negro. We stopped to talk and partner wanted me to ride in front to San Ignacio so he could see how the trailer acted in the strong side wind. So I get down the highway where it splits and I take the San Ignacio direction. Sure enough I get a couple of miles down the road and I don’t see a partner in the mirror. I go back to the Pemex thinking he doubled back for fuel. I get fuel but he’s not there. So I ride on toward San Ignacio thinking about the prospect of finishing my trip solo. I got real comfortable with the idea and I was super disappointed when I see a bike with hard bags pulling into a Pemex a long ways ahead of me. It’s him. He had gone into Guerrero Negro just like he said he wouldn’t do. He was very excited and so happy to see me.

    After this we go through Vizcaino a small but busy place with three driving lanes. The right goes east and the far left goes west. The double lane with concrete islands on each side goes down the middle and acts like an express lane, with the same number of alto signs. We would be back here later today.

    Heading east toward San Ignacio I notice that partner is missing again, but this time I can’t just stop on the highway to turn around. There was too much traffic and this highway had very little shoulder before you get to about a four foot drop off. Of course I find a place with room for me to turn around and head back to see what happened to partner. I see him on the side of the road with his rear wheel off and very nice older man in a small pickup with two ladies. I’m there a few minutes and they all get into the pickup, partner in the pickup bed and they head back to Vizcaino. I follow and they head for a tire store, get the tube patched and head back to the bike. I go ahead and when I get to the bike there’s a new pickup there. The guy in it is a Baja motorcycle racer and he wants to help. He says there are new tubes in San Ignacio .

    We get back on the road in the dark and partner is missing again. I go back and he is parked on the side of the road with another flat rear tire. He says he will sleep hear and wants me to go get a motel room in San Ignacio. I leave him and start riding but I start feeling really guilty about my situation. So I get to the Pemex just as you get into town, fuel up and stop at this taco stand to get four burritos and drinks to take back to partner. I show up and we eat. I setup my tent and got to sleep in the wind. Partner couldn’t understand why I would want to come back to where he was. I just said it’s a partner kind of thing. I don’t think he understood. Also, I made the mistake of telling partner that there was a closed restaurant about 2 km up the road.

    The next morning I put his rear tire in my trailer and head out for San Ignacio. I rode around town a little. The place is built in a palm tree forest. Beautiful, and the town square looks like fun. I finally find a guy delivering water who can take me to motorcycle tubes. This leads to another great find, Alonso. At this tire place is this guy that is a giant offroad racing fan. He has new Chinese 300X18 tubes. Puts one in place with the old tube split and put over it because the tire now has small holes that go all the way through the carcass. But before this he puts tape over the spoke nipples that have some kind of hardened goo on them from where partner had tried to mount the tire tubeless.

    I had asked partner to please wait at his bike and then we could go to the restaurant together. As I’m about 1 km past the restaurant I see partner hiking up the highway. He wants to ride on the back of the 701 to his bike about 1 km away. Sure. When we get to his bike I start breaking camp and he starts mounting the rear wheel, which gives him a little trouble. I get done and I’m ready to ride the 24 km back to San Ignacio. Alonso’s place is easy to find. It’s on highway 1 just two km past the turn off to downtown. Partner is a little irritated and tells me to take off, he will meet me at Alonso’s. I’m at Alonso’s for at least an hour and I get a rare phone call from partner. He’s got another flat and he’s almost to Alonso’s. Once he shows up he decides that he wants me to ride on with the trailer to buy a tire in Mulege on the coast.

    So I take off and ride through some really interesting countryside with good asphalt roads. I get to Mulege to look for the motorcycle shop. It wasn’t obvious so I start asking anyone I can find where the shop is. Finally I’m sitting at a stop sign when this guy rides up the other way on a big Honda single. I wave and he pulls up, says his name is Al and gives me his ADVrider handle and I recognize it as one that partner had talked about quite a bit. He knows partner! Apparently they had spoken in the past about a Baja trip. He just took a tire off his KTM that would fit partner’s bike and have enough life to get to the border if he lays off the throttle. So Al takes me back to the motorcycle shop. It looks like an auto repair shop. But they do have new, better quality tubes and Al’s old tire, which they gave me for free.

    During my ride to Mulege I came upon a federal police stop. This was not one of those military stops, or a local policia. The apparent leader, a giant of a man, looked at me and started laughing and waving me on. I’m not sure what was going on there but it sure felt good to be waved through.

    By the time I get back to Alonso’s he is closing and partner has a room downtown. I get a call to go through to partner. He wants me to come stay in his room so I can help him pay for it. I say no and head for the Beans and Rice hotel/RV Park/restaurant and bar just as you come into town on highway 1. What a great deal that turns out to be. The walls are plastered with posters and pictures of offroad motorcycle racers. There were two other riders on 500 KTMs staying there. They were from Oregon and told some wild stories of their Baja experiences. They were great fun after some shots and beers. For some reason they didn’t want anything to do with ADVrider.
    18 Rice and Beans bar.JPG
    The next morning I’m still a little sore from the ride the day before and I’m taking my time packing and getting breakfast. I get a call from partner. He says what I’m doing sounds good, to take my time and meet him later at Alonso’s. Once I’m ready I head for the tire shop and there’s no one there. Partner’s old tire is on the floor so he did get it changed. He had been talking about riding by himself so I figured he took off for the border. When I got back to Rice and Beans the two riders from Oregon say I should ride with them. We headed for Vizcaino and stop at a gas/store type place to fill up and have a cold drink. They say they’re taking a back road and to meet them at Mama Espinoza’s motel in El Rosario. It’s only about 100 miles and I’ll get there in no time.
    19 Leaving Rice and Beans.jpg
    Here I’m packed up and leaving Rice and Beans.

    Vizcaino is actually 280 miles from El Rosario, not about 100. It was quite a feeling pulling over in the dark in the mountains to put my stove fuel in my bike. It was also a great feeling to get about 5 miles further and see the lights of town. Another lesson learned! Don’t trust strangers that you think know what they’re talking about. The really stupid part of this is that I have an inReach Explorer that I Bluetooth pair with an iPad Mini which gives me larger maps and easier text messaging. I kick myself now for not using it more on this trip.
    #2
  3. duggram

    duggram Happy to be Retired Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    581
    Location:
    Truth or Consequences, NM
    20 Mama's Baja sign.JPG
    Mama’s place was just a super pleasure. When I opened the door to my room it was definitely the best place I’d seen on my trip. And diner was just as good. I love chili rellenos. But here they make them without cheese and stuffed with sautéed shrimp. The local valley is a big agricultural area and everything here was local. Great food! This is also a favorite place for Malcolm Smith, who seems to be everywhere in this area of Baja.
    21 At Mama's.jpg
    When I got to El Rosario and back into cell range the text messages started coming in. Partner had decided to go to Loreto to get a new tire (Loreto the place I really wanted to visit and he didn’t want to). Partner had a total of five rear flats on his trip. He couldn’t understand why I didn’t want to turn around and ride the 477 miles back to Loreto to see him. I should have asked him why he rode on to Loreto without me. But I was pretty done with this guy and it didn’t matter any longer.

    So the next morning I took off through the mountains again toward Ensenada. It was a pretty good ride with plenty of scenery. But I don’t like big cities so I started out to get through town. I stopped at a gas station to ask directions to San Felipe and this guy, an obvious Robby Gordon fan as seen on the back window of his fairly new pickup said he would show me the way. By the time I got back out into the country I started to get concerned with the pending sunset. I stopped and asked another guy about a motel. He said there were none until you get to San Felipe. So I started looking for a place to camp when I came upon this white metal gate that had just been locked. At the top of the gate was a simple little sign that said hotel. I saw the gatekeeper walking down the hill to the little guard shack and honked my loud Husky horn. It was enough to get his attention and he came back to let me in. Yes, this drive led to a hotel. It was at least 20 km down this hillside over a very rough, rain rutted road. And sure enough there was about a quarter mile of sand deep enough for me to fall in. There was no way I was picking up my bike and trailer, so I dug out my Dirt Napper bike jack and jacked my bike back up. From here I rode slowly down the road. When I finally got to the resort hotel the caretaker came out to guide me into the courtyard. It was dark now, but what a great find this place was. Rancho Agua Caliente hot springs. They didn’t have any hot water and the room was 1700 pesos, and by far my most expensive room, about $85. I took a bath the next morning in the hot soaking pool. I liked it because the water was constantly flowing in and out. I hung out at the inlet.

    23 Rancho Agua Caliente sign.JPG
    24 Rancho Agua Caliente late.jpg
    Getting into Rancho Agua Caliente late.
    24.1 Rancho Agua Caliente camping.JPG
    Camping at Rancho Agua Caliente which is relatively cheap at $30 but I was too tired to not get a room.
    25.1 Rancho Agua Caliente day shot.JPG
    After a first class breakfast I took off for the hill climb out and on to San Felipe where they were getting ready for the SCORE Baja 250. The climb was anticlimactically easy and the highway to San Felipe was in perfect condition. The closer I got to San Felipe the more I would see Baja racers out running their loud machines. Some of them put on spectacular shows in the air.
    26 Mariscos La Morena.jpg
    Dinner at Mariscos La Morena on the San Felipe boardwalk. Best seafood in San Felipe. I should have taken more pics of this area and the food. Can’t forget the fresh shrimp tacos. I’ll be back!
    28 Chencho's San Felipe.jpg
    Chencho’s is a small family restaurant in San Felipe that I could walk to from Kiki’s and ate there a few times. I was always the only customer there, but they had good food and service. The Mexican people I met on my trip are the sweetest people I’ve ever met. They ‘re always doing their best to help you.

    When I got to San Felipe I went back to the same grocery store for pesos. I remembered seeing a few RV/motels a little further down the street from where we stayed our first night. As I rode by, the last one looked the nicest and it was. Kikis RV Camping Hotel. Camping was in any empty RV spot. Each spot had a patio above the spot. Each had water and electricity and the restrooms looked brand new. I hung around for a couple of days then decided that it was getting too noisy with racers and Trump was visiting Calexico, my crossing town, threatening to close the border. Plus Kiki had no more space for me over the weekend. One of the all winter visitors told me that as we got closer to race day the noise would go all night long and you would not get any sleep for a few days. So I decided to leave. But the day before I left I got a text from partner telling me that the motel had our vehicles towed away and it would cost $285 to get them out of impound. About 15 minutes later I get another text, April Fools! He got me good. For some reason he road 10 hours the day before so he could cross the border on April 1st.
    27 Kiki's winter residents.jpg
    I really made a big mistake by not taking more pictures. My campsite here was in front of Kiki’s winter residents. The facilities for my campsite were the best I’ve seen. I’ll be back to this place too.

    About food in Baja, I only got sick one time. It was a breakfast of eggs rancheros. The rest of my trip I had pancakes and ham which sometimes came with fresh fruit like sections of papayas mango or orange. For other meals I ordered whatever looked best at the time and I never felt anything like nausea.

    I hope partner can slow down and think about must haves for a trip like communication and honesty. I know I learned a lot on this trip and for sure I’ll be a better partner in the future, or I’m confident enough now to travel solo. I saw quite a few solo riders so it’s not that out of the ordinary.

    29 Kiki's Beach mountain.jpg
    So that’s my first trip to Baja. I learned a lot and got over lots of mysteries. For sure I’m starting Spanish lessons. I had a few thoughts of selling my home in T or C and moving to Baja like lots of other Americans and Canadians have. But that seems a little extreme now that I’m back in my T or C living room. I was going to sell my 40’ toyhauler this summer but maybe I’ll move it down south instead for a winter home. Some mistakes I made were not taking enough pics, riding days were way to long, and taking too much stuff. I’d also like to do more offroad next trip and eventually make a trip in the Jeep Wrangler. For sure if anyone has a suggestion to make, all comments would be appreciated.

    Finishing up with some beach pictures from Kiki's place.
    #3
  4. duggram

    duggram Happy to be Retired Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    581
    Location:
    Truth or Consequences, NM
    30 Kiki's beach boat launch.jpg

    And the tree next to my tent which provided so much shade.

    31 my tree at Kiki's.jpg
    #4
  5. NMTrailboss

    NMTrailboss Team Dead End

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Oddometer:
    8,625
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    That's a crazy report Doug! Everyone comes back from Baja with some unique and interesting stories and you kept that alive for sure! Thanks for posting up the trip report and you are right...always need more photos! :deal

    :thumb
    #5
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  6. chilejack

    chilejack Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    300
    Location:
    Albuquerque
    Do the Jeep trip when you get really old, 85?
    #6
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  7. Bike Guy

    Bike Guy Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    847
    Location:
    sierra foothills, hwy 49
    You are a prince of a traveling companion and a very easy going guy. Great bike choice too.
    Really enjoyed the RR and your personal comments. My trip as in Feb and I hit some of the same spots. Thanks for the info
    #7
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  8. nk14zp

    nk14zp Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2010
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    2,360
    Location:
    Maine
    Kudos fir not killing "partner".
    #8
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  9. duggram

    duggram Happy to be Retired Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    581
    Location:
    Truth or Consequences, NM
    I don't know. I was talking to a snowbird about DWI in Baja. He laughed. He said the police don't care if you have an open container. Just don't hurt anyone. Of course I don't really need to do that. But after a big dinner and few beers, a jeep would be easier to handle. But none of that is important. I just want to get back for more time there.
    #9
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  10. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,078
    Location:
    Corrales, New Mexico
    Great report. When I retire again. I will have to do Baja. Did you see any sail boats for rent? I have only ventured into Mexico once long ago. We took four Hobie Cats and camped on the beach for a week. Rocky Point had some of the best sailing anywhere.
    #10
  11. duggram

    duggram Happy to be Retired Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    581
    Location:
    Truth or Consequences, NM
    I did hear a story about a young lady that was paddling a kayak from Lapaz north and quit at Bahia de Los Angeles when the sharks stared getting to close. Not my kind of fun.
    #11
  12. chilejack

    chilejack Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    300
    Location:
    Albuquerque
    You've already got a 3-wheeler!
    #12
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  13. Blakebird

    Blakebird r-u-n-n-o-f-t

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2004
    Oddometer:
    26,348
    Location:
    Parker, CO
    I've been lucky that trips to Baja have been with long time riding buddies from all over the place...Reading this, that's something I guess I've taken for granted a bit! :lol2

    :thumb
    #13
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  14. SpiritAtBay

    SpiritAtBay Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2014
    Oddometer:
    184
    Great report.
    Thanks for posting.
    Good on ya for not letting ‘partner’ ruin your trip.
    #14
  15. Dillard

    Dillard Seeker

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    282
    Location:
    in my mind
    You could re-title this, "The Patience of Job". Great report and pics. And good on ya for taking care of your riding partner.
    #15
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  16. Will

    Will Carpe Moto.

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2001
    Oddometer:
    442
    Location:
    Wandering
    Nice report. You never have enough photos until you suddenly have too many.
    #16
  17. Folly1

    Folly1 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
    Oddometer:
    679
    Location:
    Charleston, SC : Bath, Me
    Good job with stories and photos. I have been to Alaska twice on a motorcycle and have only 5% of the pics I should have taken.

    b
    #17
  18. Snownut

    Snownut Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    105
    Location:
    Land of the Beehive
    Every time I go to Baja I minimize my gear from the previous ride and still return thinking I took too much stuff. A small camera on a lanyard under my jacket helps with taking photos and not feeling like i have to stop and go through a process to take photos. I do take less and less though every time I go though. Finding a good partner isn't easy (you clearly are a patient person), I have gone solo down there and really enjoyed it. In my opinion It actually opens up opportunities to meet locals and other travelers. Over the years I have also learned to take my time and not try to get miles under my belt each day. I'll bet I passed San Ignacio three or four times before I finally went down to the square and explored it. Now its a must for a break when traveling through. For me its now about exploring and leaving stress behind, taking each day as it comes and enjoying the ride. I have heard numerous reports of people having bad experiences in Baja because of "partner", maybe that's why I ride solo as much as I do..
    #18
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  19. duggram

    duggram Happy to be Retired Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    581
    Location:
    Truth or Consequences, NM
    I like what you say. My problem is that I really am getting older, and a little weaker. I do carry a Dirt Napper on top of my seat so I can get to it if I get pinned under the bike while riding solo. I also think having a trusted partner to ride with is best because of things like sharing, working out problems, and security. I do agree with my friends that want to limit their group size to four. When we were at BLA a group six KTM riders stayed in the rooms behind us on the beach. They did seem coordinated which I didn't expect but I think they all knew each other for many years. In my opinion definitely an exception. Then the two guys I met from Oregon seemed to work together with no flaws. Listening to their experiences they were a good match.
    #19
  20. Motorius

    Motorius Road trippin'

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Oddometer:
    3,991
    Location:
    Seattle & Phoenix
    As much as I ride alone around AZ, I agree having a partner in MX makes sense. Even with an Inreach, help may come too late.
    #20
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