2021 KLX300

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by norton73, Nov 23, 2020.

  1. Fla_Dawg

    Fla_Dawg Been here awhile Supporter

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    Appreciate that info. Basing those Kawi Manual % #s @ 60mpg I would say the following (rounding down/conservative):

    1.3 ~ 78 miles
    0.5 ~ 30 miles
    Fuel bottle 0.2 ~ 12 miles

    120 total miles @ 60mpg w/stock tank and 30oz fuel bottle.

    Theoretically with the higher top end of the 300 vs my 230 I won't be WOT barely holding 65mph, especially coming back home into the coastal headwinds here, I could estimate 65-70mpg increasing that range to 140 miles give or take.
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  2. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades... Super Supporter

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    Never trusted gas gauges, I prefer to know what my gas mileage is and use that to know... plus the carb bikes have reserve of course. I could run the KLX650 and know I should start looking at around 120 miles, doing near 180 miles on the 3.2 gallon tank a few times. Only ran out one time... as I rolled in the gas station.

    But with a fuel pump in the tank on the street bike I don't particularly want to stretch it much since the fuel also acts as a coolant on the pump. As I understood it from a friend who had it happen, the old S10 Chevys could burn out fuel pumps if run too much while under 1/4 tank.
  3. tooter

    tooter Been here awhile

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    I log my gas mileage so as to have a reliable profile of consumption. The last 210 miles averaged 81.6 mpg. I fill the tank every ~80 miles because we live in a disaster prone area.
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  4. scootertrog

    scootertrog Jedi Fart Master

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    Heads-up folks. I'll be listing a few few nice items in the classifieds today that you might be interested in (all came off a 2018 KLX250s):

    Seat Concepts "Low Comfort" seat
    shift levers (both OEM & aftermarket)

    Also have a Mosko Moto jacket, Klim Carlsbad pants & Bell MX-9 helmet listed
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  5. tooter

    tooter Been here awhile

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    I'm working on some other things right now, but I plan to dyno test the FMF Megabomb header as the only change so as to isolate exactly what effect it has on performance.

    IMG_0183.JPG
  6. Canadian eh

    Canadian eh Adventurer

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    My wife's son is considering his first bike. He's an RCMP officer in his late 20's living in a fairly remote area with lots of trails etc. He has no bike experience. His other choice is a KLR 650 (:rofl)!! He's 6'1" and weighs about 160lbs. I used to be a dirt biker and rode a KX500 as well as a few DP bikes. I've tried suggesting that the KLX300 is the perfect starting bike and that a KLR650 would be like trying to manhandle a buffalo on a trail and when he tips it over he'd be waiting a long time for help getting it back up and that's if he wasn't underneath it squished!

    I've been so impressed with watching YouTube videos and so on that I'm even considering getting one myself. I'm 60 in a few months, overweight and to be honest would use it as a short commuter to work, running errands around town and riding the occasional trail after driving up to see my step son with my wife with the bike in a the pick up.

    I have a few questions: What options are there for modifying the suspension for a bigger guy? What is recommended for "Bark Buster" type of hardware? What brand etc is recommended for larger foot pegs? What other recommendations are there to make to this bike? Just trying to make a bit of a spread sheet with a cost of things. I haven't ridden dirt bikes since my new 1990 KX500 so I've been out of the loop for 30 years so any suggestions for aftermarket bolt ons, modifications would be gratefully appreciated. I had a dream of a KTM Adventure bike but realise it was just a dream and not practical whereas this bike would get daily use in the three months I could ride it. Cheers :)
  7. tooter

    tooter Been here awhile

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    While I can't comment on suspension because I'm just a little guy, I can comment on being an old rider on a KLX300SM.
    IMG_0176.JPG

    I have been using motorcycles for daily transportation for 56 years. My KLX is flat out the most user friendly bike I've ever owned. I use it for everyday utility transportation in my business. A 300 is the sweet spot. It's fast enough without being big and heavy like most new bikes are these days.

    IMS makes high quality pegs.

    [​IMG]

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/233763709698?epid=171283708&hash=item366d672302:g:RQwAAOSwq85fnSG6
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  8. scootertrog

    scootertrog Jedi Fart Master

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  9. DJ_MI

    DJ_MI Adventurer

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    I think the KLX300 sounds just like what you're looking for. The only other direct equivilant, IMHO, is the CRF300L.

    I'm hoping these hand guards are available soon. I don't want to change the bars or drill the ends for aftermarket guards. They'd be nice on the trail but I really want them to help shield my hands from the cold wind since I plan on trying to extend my riding season as long as possible.
    https://www.kawasaki.com/en-us/shop..._-VEHICLEACCESSORY-_-VEHICLEACCESSORIESBUCKET

    I haven't found a need to upgrade my suspension yet. I weighed myself with all my gear (armored jacket, boots, helmet, pocket gear, etc.) and I'm 229lbs ready to ride. I'd like to stiffen the rear preload but it looks pretty hard to get to. The service manual recommends removing the rear shock to adjust the preload. If you buy one new I'd take the opportunity to have the dealer adjust it as part of the initial setup. The dampers are compression adj in the front and comp/rebound adjustable in the rear. I've made multiple adjustments to fine tune the damping to my preference.
  10. scootertrog

    scootertrog Jedi Fart Master

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    Those essentially amount to being "wind guards" and will be toast after the first drop. Due to the width of the bar, it takes a tremendous beating and absorbs a lot of the bike's weight when laid over on it's side. Good handguards are worth it.
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  11. DJ_MI

    DJ_MI Adventurer

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    Something I thought about is that these figures are all based on the stock odo which tends to read fast... possibly by as much as 5%. Something to be considered when planning a route off a map or GPS.

    I added MPG to the calcs I posted before.
    KLX300_MPG2.jpg

    I planned my longest route yet last weekend. Going from north of Detroit, through Detroit, downriver and back. I figured it'd be a good chance to test the fuel light / MPG.

    My light came on @ 110.5 miles. Filled up @ 114.6 miles with 1.481 gallons for a calculated MPG of 77.38.

    !2021-07-24 13.09.01.jpg
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  12. Cam

    Cam Long timer

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    I owned a KLR for years and truly love the bike but your description is accurate. For trail riding particularly for a newer rider, the lighter KLX300 is going to be a vastly superior motorcycle. If he were doing multi-day camping trips that were days away, the KLR might be a good pick otherwise lighter is vastly better.


    Seat Concepts tall seat and lower the foot pegs are the two go-tos for us tall riders. I am 6'3" and end up doing that to virtually every offroad motorcycle I am on. HDB handguards are the gold standard but there are many brands that are really good as well. I do avoid Acerbis and the cheap knockoff brands. I am not sure the full peg assortment for the KLX currently but for a tall guy look for a lowering peg which can often be found from companies like Fasst and Knight Design. There are often some fellows on here that can customize some as well. Like all offroad motorcycles often the best modification is matching the suspension to the rider. I budget for it on every bike. It is the one change that will make the most difference and typically have the biggest positive impact. A properly set up suspension is safer and more fun. After that a comfortable seat, good pegs, some hand protection all of which you have already pinpointed.
  13. DJ_MI

    DJ_MI Adventurer

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    Thanks. I hadn’t really considered that.
  14. Wkoppa

    Wkoppa Adventurer

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    I have a 2021 KLX 300 and have added the following accessories and or equipment.

    Kenda 760 DOT off road tires.

    Wolfman Tank Bag.

    T-Rex center stand.

    Tidy Tail from E-bay. Complicated installation.

    Valve cap Tire Pressure Sensor (TPS) system from Amazon.

    Garmin Zumo GPS.

    Deltran battery tender.

    In the future.

    2.7 gallon fuel tank is in the mail.

    Cogent rear spring for those with an athletic build (over 200 pounds). Maybe front springs.

    Pro taper bar risers and pro taper bars.

    Comfort seat foam.

    The most important upgrade - Kenda 760's. Here in Northern Michigan the sand can be especially treacherous. Using the TPS I can stay in touch with what I am running as far as air pressure. I pack an Aerostich portable electric air pump so I can air up if I want. I also pack a Garmin In-reach mini so the wife can send out the search party after a couple days:) Here in Michigan the trees are fairly close and the trails tight, I don't feel any need for more motor or louder pipes.

    I hope this helps.

    Wayne Koppa
    Grayling, MI
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  15. DJ_MI

    DJ_MI Adventurer

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    Nice info! What size tires did you go with?
  16. Wkoppa

    Wkoppa Adventurer

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    Kenda 760 80/100-21
    Kenda 760 100/100-18

    Rear did not look that big when I got it but hooks up just fine.
    Both tires came in under $100 shipped (from Dennis Kirk).
    Sold my never used stock tires for $30.

    Wayne Koppa
    Grayling, MI
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  17. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades... Super Supporter

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    You have learned a dirt riding secret - you don't need massive wide tires on the back. Too wide eats power and too much traction (yes, too much) can bog the engine down when you least want it. If you look at 50 hp MX bikes you will see a surprisingly narrow knobby. I run a 4.10-18 rear tire on my 250, about the same as a 100/100, a 60/40 tire. In a knobby the 100/100 would be wider at the outside of the knobs. The smaller tire allows the rider to spin up the back wheel when needed, like starting out in deep sand or mud, to get rolling and stay in the power band.
  18. southwade

    southwade Long timer

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    In the 4x4 world they're called pizza cutters. They're better on almost every surface except smooth pavement and bottomless mud.
  19. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades... Super Supporter

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    Is anything good in bottomless mud other than a gaggle of people to help get you out of it? :lol3
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  20. southwade

    southwade Long timer

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    Pizza cutter tires track better (don't pull towards ruts and road grooves) than fatter tires.

    They also air down better in sand and mud, for a given diameter, than fat tires. Due to less "plowing" as you drive through the soft stuff.

    This is why most military vehicles have pizza cutters.

    Fat tires are better for rock crawling, gravel roads, high speed dirt and other places where the fatter tire will give more traction due to the greater rubber contact patch for a given deflation height.