2021 KTM 890 Adventure / Adventure R / Adventure R Rally

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by 06Z, Oct 6, 2020.

  1. groot-stuff

    groot-stuff Been here awhile

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  2. markgrolex

    markgrolex Been here awhile

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    looks great!
    Mosko has a hit with the orange- someone was thinking and hit a home run
    tell us about those wheels? sizes, cost, options, tubes ?
    and what tires?
    and report back after some usage
    all looks sweet
  3. Peby

    Peby Adventurer

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    For those with the Adventure S - or with an S windscreen on the R - how is the windscreen on the road? Looking for something to help a bit with the buffering.
  4. tft

    tft Spends to much time on advrider. Supporter

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    GF-kam likes this.
  5. ToriMish

    ToriMish Long timer Super Supporter

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    The 890 Adventure R Rally's have started showing up in Australia. Couple of local fellas got theirs today, and I went to check them out.

    tonyubsdell and nibby like this.
  6. Jewcati

    Jewcati Been here awhile

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    Excel tagaskos with haan hubs. 1.85 front/ 2.5 rear. Tubes. Motoz rallz rear/ mt21 front.

    Won’t have a chance to ride the. Until next weekend. But did a quick shakedown run on the street.
  7. MeefZah

    MeefZah Curmudgeonly Supporter

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    I like the S on the R. Just came back from 2 days, 950 miles of norCal and it was decently smooth even with a peaked helmet and at over 100 mph several times; sustained speeds of 90 on the interstate hopping from one exit to another 45 miles away; and 2 lane speeds in the 55-80 mph area. I'd do it again. I'm 6'00" if that helps, and coming off a V-Strom 1000 and a Super Tenere, both of which have worse buffeting with the stock screens IMO.

    The S screen isn't too large, either; I hate big screens. It looks appropriate on the R and shouldn't strain the mounting assembly since it was designed for it. Also doesn't interfere with off road use or standing.
    Peby likes this.
  8. BikesRfun

    BikesRfun Adventurer

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    Jun 3, 2010
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    Boston, MA
    Trying to decide between Mosko Moto Reckless 80 vs their Offset Backcountry panniers for my new KTM 890 Adventure R. Anyone have to make this decision or have opinions on which is better and why?
  9. Matthewm

    Matthewm Been here awhile

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    I went with R80 Reckless. After having racks whether it was hard or soft panniers...I never want them again. Too much weight, too much potential for damage to the racks, bike, and ankles, just all around obtrusive. For me and what I need is something soft, light as possible, and tight to the bike. Plus with the R80 you can leave the tailbag behind and beavertail off and just use the leg holsters at 50L.
  10. groot-stuff

    groot-stuff Been here awhile

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    I went with the BC Offset panniers and 40L duffle... a large deciding factor was poor experiences with another brand's rack-less luggage (always coming loose until I literally bolted it down... but Mosko's system may be perfectly adequate). The other factor for me personally was the fact that I won't be doing much hardcore riding with them on, so the ability to lock them to the bike or the convenience of taking on/off the panniers when traveling was more important to me.

    It really depends on the type of riding you'll be doing, where you'll be using them, storing your bike and what needs to go in them... in other words, there isn't a right or wrong choice - it depends! Like everything right... but take in everyone's perspective, read more forum threads and watch some videos to really learn the practical aspects of using each system.

    Some forum threads to read while birthing logs...
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/soft-pannier-vs-reckless-system-for-gsa.1436288/
    https://advrider.com/mosko-moto-reckless-80-first-ride/
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/thoughts-on-rackless-soft-luggage.1028165/

    Since I did more research on the Back Country Panniers here are a few videos with some nuggets of information I found valuable.




    Here is one more about packing up camp into an R80, which ended up solidifying my choice to the panniers (too much stuffing and not enough organization and I like..., no I need to pack in a very structured way, it is just how I'm wired)


    Again, it is a very personal choice!
    JimmyMojave, tonyubsdell and Matthewm like this.
  11. Matthewm

    Matthewm Been here awhile

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    Great points.
    One's usage really is a big factor. I actually won't be removing mine, which was another factor. Riding BDRs mostly, I will be camping. I usually camp in "back country" type of areas anyway, along with some rougher type riding, so going rackless for me will suit me quite well. It's also why I went with the 80 over the 40.
    groot-stuff likes this.
  12. robin_nerf

    robin_nerf Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 28, 2020
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    Sweden
    Have anyone tested stuff from viejospistones.com ?
    I noticed they got some parts like Headlight brace, Abs sensor protector, rear brake master cylinder guard that is really expensive for us in Europe to get from Rottweiler.
    They also got a "Fuel pump protector", do you guys know if this will make the Axp skid-plate fit or is the Rottweiler one the only one small enough ?
    https://viejospistones.com/producto/protector-bomba-gasolina-ktm-790-adventure/
  13. groot-stuff

    groot-stuff Been here awhile

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    Finally made some to fabricate my rear mud flap, very happy with the results.

    Some first pass prototyping... 2 bolts to brackets that connect to the 3rd passenger peg mounting bolt and 2 bolts into the airbox. The rubber goes up between the airbox and upper fender/mud guard so there is complete coverage/no where for mud and water to make it through.
    - Yes, I deleted my passenger pegs... the wife rides her own bike
    mud1.jpg mud2.jpg mud3.jpg

    In seeing how much mud coverage I had with this prototype, I decided to delete the pooper scooper that covers the rear shock...
    I felt it was ugly and it also keeps me from cleaning the spring and shock "push rod" (don't know what that's really called lol).
    I had to pop the rear/bottom bolt from the shock to slide it off it (so no cutting was required). The tolerances were very tight between the shock and swingarm (as expected), it took some time and patience to lightly tap it back into alignment with a rubber mallet... nothing I'm not used to when servicing the my other bike's swingarm linkage.
    mud6.jpg mud4.jpg mud5.jpg mud7.jpg

    My second and final pass at shaping the rubber allowed me to make the flap wider for even better coverage.
    On my "installment" ride (akin to an installment lap for you track-goers or racing followers) I had to trim it more near the exhaust to keep it from rubbing (and burning).
    Then I went out for my first "trip simulation" (akin to a "race simulation" during practice sessions :) )

    The mud flap worked flawlessly. You'll see there is a forward kink in it, this was a undesired but necessary design change from my initial idea due to the bike just not being designed for one (and the material used (Nylon reinforced Neoprene rubber).
    I ended up bolting it to the stock mud protector mounting points to prevent the tire rubbing on it.
    The curve I set in it ensures when the suspension compresses - the flap bows inward, not outward into the rear tire.
    mud8.jpg mud9.jpg mud10.jpg
  14. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    That looks like it ought to do the job!

    Just FYI for the next time you need to pull the shock. That's a threaded bushing the bottom shock bolt threads into. After removing the bolt the bushing can be turned out (Lefthand thread) so that the shock easily slips out and back in. Once back in place with the shock bolt just started in the bushings threads lightly tighten the bushing to 10nm (or some such thing, it's in the manual).

    It's actually a pretty slick set-up, but it trips a lot of people up.
    Yellow Pig and groot-stuff like this.
  15. groot-stuff

    groot-stuff Been here awhile

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    Sharing the fun of my first "trip simulation" to test out all the accessories and my skills on the big bike (this is my first Adv bike).

    I planned a 200+ mile route, with hopes the dirt sections would be free of snow and maybe just a little wet (we got snow recently but it had been warm for quite a few days).
    So I set out with cautious expectations as it was my first time with more than a bag of tools strapped to the rear... figured slab and dry forest roads... turn around if they got too muddy or snowy, especially because I was solo alone.

    But then I met a couple guys on the trail... I was about to turn around and cook up some lunch, but figured I could push my comfort level in the company of others...
    trip1.jpg

    So we kept going... first it got wet, then it got muddy... then it got snowy with 4x4 tracks dug into the dirt
    trip2.jpg
    But this picture was the easier of the snowy terrain we encountered... some sections were entirely snow covered with just 4x4 tracks slightly packing the snow.
    Dropping my tire pressure from 36 hot to 31 hot made a significant difference in front grip in the mud and rear traction in the snow.

    We made it to the very top of the pass, after many... many... MANY... sections of mud and snow. Despite my stomach being in my throat from the excitement, nerves and genuine dislike of riding in snow... I definitely got my work out in and enjoyed the climb.
    trip3.jpg

    So we got to the slab again... and enjoyed a nice cruise along a river.
    trip3b.jpg
    We stopped for our DRZ compadre to get gas and figured we had 2 hours of slab to get home... then... for some reason, I followed these guys up a county road that I knew turned into a shaded forest road that follows a valley.

    I don't have any pictures of this section as it was after 4pm and we knew time was against us and daylight was waning.
    We encountered even more snow than before, multiple long stretches of pure snow trail with 4x4 tracks packing lines for us to follow. Sometimes we'd drop into a 4-8 inch oval-shaped pothole of icy water, glad I had my Drystar Tech 7s on! My feet were cold but not wet :)

    Then... a straight up mud bog for ~400 feet with foot deep ruts, thankfully there were alternate lines not as deep!
    Somewhere in the middle we crossed a creek 3 or 4 times, all over a foot deep with baby head rocks on both banks and at the bottom! I'm also not a fan of water crossings but I handle them well, and the bike was great through all of this.

    I was even impressed with myself, being my first big Adv bike, fully laden on my maiden voyage - I only tipped over 3 or 4 times in those pure snow covered areas. I will claim the many, many years of dirt bike riding with a constant focus on skill improvement helped significantly. Even still, I am hoping to complete a training course with West38Moto... continuous improvement is always my goal.

    Once we made it through that hellish trail (yes, more of a trail than forest road... it is a highly used OHV area)... we got back to the pavement and enjoyed a cruise along the S. Platte River in the twilight hour. One more dirt connecting road suitable for any AWD/4x4 vehicle and we hit slab again for the last 1.5 hours home.

    trip4.jpg trip5.jpg trip6.jpg

    I had never been so happy to blast down some slab and get home after 9 hours and 205 miles. What an adventure... what a first real ride on my 890R... what a blast!
    I am still sore 2 days later - and it was all worth it. I love this bike!

    Attached Files:

  16. eRdd

    eRdd Why come you got no tattoo?

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    Joining the 890 club tomorrow morning. Dealer called today, the bike is ready and I have the day book off from work.
  17. David_Moen

    David_Moen Long timer Supporter

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    Have fun! What dealer and part of the island?
  18. eRdd

    eRdd Why come you got no tattoo?

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    Action Motorcycles in Esquimalt. They sold four 890s on the weekend!
  19. David_Moen

    David_Moen Long timer Supporter

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    Salmon Arm, B.C. Canada Eh!
    I've been in there a few times while visiting kids at UVIC and other family. They seem like decent folks there. Go get it dirty!
  20. eRdd

    eRdd Why come you got no tattoo?

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2019
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    Well, whatever they've been doing, it's been working. This is my third new bike from them in 8 years.