2021 KTM Duke 200

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by cabanza, Jul 29, 2020.

  1. cabanza

    cabanza Smooth is Fast

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    An interview from KTM Chief Executive in June reveals that there currently is less demand for large displacement bikes. According to him, customers will want to buy small(er) displacement bikes due to the economic crisis and the pandemic which should last through the end of 2021. He draws a parallel to car makers who predict a decline of 20% in production during that period.

    http://www.lerepairedesmotards.com/actualites/2020/nouveautes-moto-futurs-modeles-ktm-husqvarna.php

    It seems like KTM is betting on smaller bikes. It could be a success. I think power is quoted at about 25 HP for the Duke 200. That ain't bad. Twice as much as a GROM for sure and another 6 to 8 HP more than a TW200 or a VanVan.

    Even Husqvarna may offer a Svartpilen 200:

    https://www.bikesmagindia.in/2020/07/upcoming-husqvarna-200-cc-bike-spotted.html

    [​IMG]
    #21
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  2. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    I can certainly understand a shift away from big bikes at the top of the scale, but I'm not sure it will translate to a shift to smaller bike at the bottom of the scale.

    Put another way, it's one thing to assume that the guy who might have been interested in a 1290 picks a 790 instead. It's something else to assume the guy who wanted a 390 picks a 200 instead.

    But then again, KTM surely has smarter people with more data than I do.
    #22
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  3. strongbad

    strongbad Been here awhile

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    As a CB300R owner, I'm not exactly smacking my forehead and wishing I would have waited for these KTM/Husky offerings. Always good to have more choices but the thing I really would have liked most on my bike is better suspension--something like the fully adjustable cartridge Showa SFF-BP offered on Kawasaki's new ZX-25R and I don't mind opening my wallet more to get higher quality components. I feel there is still a big gap in the market for someone to offer a high-spec, small-displacement machine. KTM/Husky is not filling it with these offerings.
    #23
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  4. cabanza

    cabanza Smooth is Fast

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    I agree with your statement. KTM is getting into the high volume business and is dipping its feet into the budget bike pool. I think what Kawasaki is doing with their ZX-25R and what Honda is doing with their CBR250RR - to some extent, is where it's at. I'd love to throw a leg over that Kawa for sure. Would I buy a Duke 200? Probably not. I'd rather get another Monkey 125 or GROM. But give KTM some credit.
    #24
  5. Drop_Center

    Drop_Center Long timer

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    They just want to get people hooked on their brand.
    #25
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  6. KeithU

    KeithU Been here awhile

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    I agree there is a gap here, but I question how big it is. A high-spec motorcycle is more expensive to develop and produce, so what you'd end up with is a 250-400cc machine that costs as much as, say, an MT-07 or Duke 790. There are very few people who would actually buy that. Most buyers have it in their heads that smaller displacement = lower price.
    #26
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  7. maxpower220

    maxpower220 Been here awhile

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    Bringing it to the US doesn't mean developing a new bike. I'm pretty sure that bike has been around for a while. Only difference is transportation to the U.S.

    However, like has been said, not sure there is a strong <250cc market here.
    #27
  8. KeithU

    KeithU Been here awhile

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    There is some cost to homologate it to US DOT and EPA requirements. This usually means some changes to labeling, lighting, reflectors, MPH speedometer (maybe already done for UK), EPA certification, evap controls for California, and a localized owners manual. Plus they need to add Duke 200 SKUs to their US supply chain. Presumably this all won't be too difficult for KTM, but they are real costs.
    #28
  9. strongbad

    strongbad Been here awhile

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    If I want to upgrade the suspension on my bike, I have to throw away the stock boingers front & rear that I've already paid for. I have to take my bike to a suspension shop far far away and pay a team of professionals to custom make decent components and I'd be paying onesy-twosy prices. It would cost thousands--possibly as much as I paid for the bike. Conversely, if Honda offered the same quality components on a hypothetical CB300RR model, lets say, the development costs would be shared across hundreds or perhaps thousands of machines. Showa, or whoever, would sharpen their pencils a lot to sell that many items. The total increased cost would be hundreds instead of thousands. A huge bargain compared to aftermarket. Would there be a market for it? I think there would be enough customers worldwide that would spring for it to make it worthwhile for Honda.

    Q: Why not just go for a large displacement KTM or whatever in the first place to get the good stuff?
    A: Gas mileage, lightness, reliability, durability...all the things the CB300R has in spades.
    #29
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  10. KeithU

    KeithU Been here awhile

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    Maybe, but also remember you're talking about Honda here. If past history is any indication the RR model would only be sold in Europe and Japan, while here in USA we'd continue to get the basic version painted maroon or silver.
    #30
  11. Dakar Dan

    Dakar Dan Long timer

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    It’s a new gateway drug as KTM’s road bikes bracket-creep upwards in capacity. In a couple of years, the 390 may be replaced by a 490 twin in the same way the 690 was replaced with the 790 twin.
    #31
  12. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Been here awhile

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    Maybe? The 390 is still going to have a place. They may well do a 490 or whatever, but it's going to be considered a Big Bike in a lot of markets where the 390 is already just inside the A2 license requirements (or the 400cc limits, hard insurance levels, etc). So the 200 could fill that smaller bike role here in the US or whatever, but then why the 200 and not the 250?

    Maybe it's just a now thing? The 250 has more of the tech goodies than the 200 so it would just be a slightly cheaper, less powerful 390. The 200 presumably will be priced low enough to be attractive.
    #32
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  13. cabanza

    cabanza Smooth is Fast

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    #33
  14. cabanza

    cabanza Smooth is Fast

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    Orange

    [​IMG]



    Or white

    [​IMG]
    #34
  15. Bill N

    Bill N Adventurer

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    This is the first KTM I've seriously considered buying. Freeway legal for the cost of a Monkey. Of course before 38 years of inflation, $3999 was what I paid for a new 1982 Sportster XLX.
    #35
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  16. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Been here awhile

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    Ooooo, another neat inflation bit.

    So that's $10,987.75 today! I don't know how that Sportster compares, but the current Iron 883 is $8,999 and the Iron 1200 is $9,999. Mostly prices go up, but it in this case it looks like Sportsters are holding steady or maybe even a little less expensive than they were back then.

    Neat! :norton
    #36
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  17. cabanza

    cabanza Smooth is Fast

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    #37
  18. liberpolly

    liberpolly Lazy rider

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    A lot of people buy second small bike, like Gixxer guys roaming around on Groms. If, unlike Grom, this is sized for American humans, it'd be a hit.
    #38
  19. GP640

    GP640 Long timer

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    Funny, I swung a leg over a Grom and found it to be small but decent.
    Not far off the 390 Duke IMO.
    I'm 6'2".
    #39
  20. fastring

    fastring Been here awhile

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    I am all for more choices but do not see the difference in this vs the 390. Add in OTD price with fees and why wouldnt you just go with the 390? Its a nice bike for the money but the 390 is a nicer value IMO.
    #40