1. a1fa

    a1fa Been here awhile

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    #1
  2. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    Buy the maps and transfer them using Mapsource.
    #2
  3. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    Your opening up a can of worms!
    #3
  4. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    There have been a couple other threads with heated debates over this. It's more of a moral issue. I do know that at least 1 person has been banned for trying to sell Sams maps.
    Its the same rule as being banned for posting torrent links.
    #4
  5. meteorpilot

    meteorpilot YEE, ahem. YEEEHAW!

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    You can cut the tension with a knife. :lurk
    #5
  6. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    Not really, I'm not going to get into it like that other thread did.
    #6
  7. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    You will learn valuable information spending the time to transfer the maps.

    If Sam sold the GPS info then it would only be a matter of months before the info was spread freely over the internet. That means that the money wouldn't be there for him to complete the TAT to the Atlantic Ocean. :cry

    Its a small price to pay for the Adventure riding that we love.
    #7
  8. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    If you're thinking about doing any section of the TAT and you have a bike, you should have enough disposable income to buy the maps.

    The man spent his time building this ride for everyone as a labor of love.

    Pay him for his time and effort.

    Dirty
    #8
  9. JimC

    JimC Long timer

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    Buy the maps, spend the time to create GPS tracks and ride the TAT. You will gain an understanding of why people are so protective of Sam's work. Sam clearly isn't making a lot of money promoting the TAT. I quite honestly am amazed that his work isn't copied and posted on the internet as it is. I only can imagine that most of the people who ride the trail gain an appreciation of the time and effort Sam put into the route. They choose not to sell their tracks, maps and roll charts out of respect for the work Sam has done.

    I don't know how many times riding through CO, UT and NV I said to myself, how the f**k did he do this. From a dual sport riding stand point his TAT is a national treasure. How many places can you go and buy the tools to embark on an honest to goodness adventure for a couple of hundred dollars. I honestly believe if you bought a set of GPS tracks and followed them it would not be the same. The maps and roll charts are part of the whole experience, they give you an appreciation for what Sam has done. I hope he can finish the rest of the route to the Atlantic soon. I'm getting old.

    Jim in Sacramento
    #9
  10. stinkfinger

    stinkfinger Chickenfat dirtbiker

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    :super


    Tony
    #10
  11. fotobo

    fotobo KTM rider

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    I just recently purchased the maps for Ok and Ar. It only takes a couple of hours for each state and the time is well spent because it gives you a little familiarity with the route. I learned something from it too. I had to break the state up into two routes to get an accurate route.
    #11
  12. KneeKicker

    KneeKicker Long timer

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    What software are you guys using. I tried this with US TOPO. I didn't work for me(although I'm a big GPS n00b).
    #12
  13. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    Just a bit of advice, don't use routes when laying out the trail. This will make the GPS function in auto route which will get you off the trail. It works WAY better when you draw track lines in Mapsource. Also your GPS accepts alot more track points and holds 20 total tracks. I easily did 1 track for each state.

    Here is a great explanation by JimC...

    Quote:
    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=alt2 style="BORDER-RIGHT: 1px inset; BORDER-TOP: 1px inset; BORDER-LEFT: 1px inset; BORDER-BOTTOM: 1px inset">Originally Posted by JimC
    It is becoming painfully obvious that a number of people who own and use GPS's do not know the difference between a route and a track. If you embark on an off road adventure and you have created routes to guide you, you will probably be in for a very rude awakening as dirty_sanchez found out.

    As simple as I can describe it (leaving out lots of confusing details)

    Route: A bunch of points you identify on a map and load into your GPS. The GPS cranks up it's routing engine and links them using data stored in the maps you have loaded on the GPS. When a route is loaded your GPS will visually announce turns and do all kinds of other weird stuff with your screen, getting you to follow its idea of where you are going. If you create a route in Mapsource and you give it to 10 of your friends odds are when they load it to their GPS's they will each end up with a different set of turns and directions than you have (Zumo's are an exception to this rule if the route was created in another Zumo). You can only have one route active and displayed on your GPS at one time. There are lots of other issues with routes that I won't get into now. The only time I use routes is when I have no idea where I am going. I then use the GPS to find a waypoint, city, hotel, etc and blindly follow the GPS because it knows how to get to where I want to go and I don't.

    Track: A series of points your draw on a map connected by straight lines. They are like drawing on a piece of paper, or better yet like creating a trace of a map. When you create a track using the drawing tools in Mapsource, the track you create will look exactly the same on your GPS as it does in on your PC, and even better yet it will look exactly the same on the gps's all 10 of your friends have, regardless of the maps they have or the manufacturer of the GPS. The track on your GPS is like taking a magic marker and drawing it on the map. It never changes and it never talks to you. All you can do is turn it on, turn it off, change the color or delete it. You use a track when you have a specific set of roads and trails you want to follow and you know where you are going. You follow a track by starting down the roads you want to follow and then periodically looking at your GPS to see if the actual track you are creating is matching the track you drew. If it is not you backtrack to the point your actual track diverges from the drawn track and pick up the correct trails.

    In a nutshell I use a route when I have no clue where I am going or how I want to get there, or when I am lost. I use a track when I know exactly where I want to go and how I want to get there. I never use a route if I am planning an off road trip. This is me, YMMV.



    Yes there are limits. When you are loading a track to your Garmin GPS you are limited to 500 track points per track. You can load 20 named (saved) tracks to your 60/76C/Etrex Hx GPS's. I created tracks for the Western TAT covering CO, UT, NV and OR. I ended up with 18 tracks containing 400-500 track points each, and it was all the detail I needed to complete the ride.

    Jim in Sacramento

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    #13
  14. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    Roads and Rec. is best for back roads and trails.
    #14
  15. fotobo

    fotobo KTM rider

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    Thanks for the advice. I am still pretty much a noob with the GPS. You may not remember but you have helped me out before. I'm pretty sure you are the one that gave me advice on which GPS to buy. I bought the 276c which I love. I didn't know you could create a route using tracks. I thought tracks was made as you were riding. I looked at mapsource and I understand now. Thanks again for helping me out.
    #15
  16. lowflyer

    lowflyer Doubleplusgood

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    That is generally good advice, but JimC is describing a user-designated route vs. and auto-calculated route. A track is a stored series of points along a route that has just been navigated. Tracks can be converted to routes in some products. Tracks are useful for seeing where you've been.

    Track = the breadcrumb trail created by the datalogging function of a GPS

    Route = the intended course to be followed (calculated or user-designated directions)
    #16
  17. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    Track also = the intended course to be followed with the track draw tool that Mapsource released last year. Its been covered in many threads why using routes to create a trip for back country travel doesn't work as well as using tracks.
    #17
  18. fotobo

    fotobo KTM rider

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    The way I understand it, there is two types of tracks. One is created on the computer using the track tool in Mapsource that I just discovered I had, thanks to Jeff, and the other one is a breadcrumb track. I have been using the route tool to plan my rides. I will now try using the track tool, since I know about it.
    #18
  19. Jeff@TheQuadShop

    Jeff@TheQuadShop TAT survivor

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    You got it. :clap
    #19
  20. JimC

    JimC Long timer

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    Routes: All routes are auto-calculated, the only difference between routes is the number of user defined via/waypoints you create. It can be as few as one (take me home), or as many as your GPS will allow (an intricate set of viapoints to force the GPS to select the roads you want to use). What is a given for all routes is that your GPS will determine what roads/trails will be used to connect the dots. The more via points you use the fewer options the GPS routing engine has and the more likely it is to select the road you want to follow.

    Tracks: A bunch of dots on a GPS/Map laid out in a particular order connected by straight lines. Each dot represents a specific latitude and longitude. A track can be created by a GPS with track loging enabled (your breadcrumb example) or by a person using the track drawing and editing tools in Garmin Mapsource, Delorme Topo Maps or many other track creation programs that are available. You pick the roads and trails the track will follow. Once drawn it never changes. I personally think Mapsource is one of the best and easiest track editiing tools to use.

    Think of a track as a bunch of via points you connect that will never be changed. Depending on your GPS you can use 500 points in a single track, and you can save and display up to 20 tracks at one time.

    Jim in Sacramento
    #20