$35.00 Heated Jacket Liner (DIY)

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by 65 Flathead, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    It weighs hardly anything, the wire only adds ounces to the thin light liner.

    You could build it into the jacket, but the Idea is to have the wires as close to you as possable. 80 watts is not enough power to heat the air (convection) it is more of conductive heat, conducting the heat to your skin.

    Think of a 75 watt liht bulb. It gets hot, but all the heat is confined to a small area. This system has the heat spread out over about 6 square feet.
    #21
  2. BuddingGeezer

    BuddingGeezer Been here awhile

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    For practical purposes 30awg copper wire has 1 ohm resistance per 10', so 30' have 3 ohms resistance. My '91 Honda ST1100 runs at 15Volts. 15/3= 5 amps. 15V x 5 amps = 75 watts. I originally used this on a BMW K100LT which put out 14V. wich produced 65 watts. I originally sewed the thread into a zip out quilted lining and I noticed the extra heat from the BMW to the Honda. I bought a new winter jacket, so I stripped the wire and sewed it into a Wal Mart Starter brand jacket just like the original poster, but I will wear it turned inside out to provide a little insulation from the wiring. Mine plugs directly to the battery with an inline off/on switch. The wire I used was Radio Shack 30awg copper hook up wire. It is a single strand wire and was $3 for 50'. I no longer can find it a RS. Stranded wire like the original poster used would be better, simply because the multiple wires are more pliable and would tend to not be as breakable when folded. I have only broken a wire 1 time and all you do is connect it back.

    Since I no longer have the quilted insulation between me and the wiring the 15 volts may be too hot. If so I'll add more wire to cool it down.

    Ralph Sims
    #22
  3. bpken11

    bpken11 Back to the Dirt

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    Great stuff, can't wait to see your schematic!

    What is the total cost Wire/jacket/controller?
    #23
  4. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    So far I have $10.00 in the jacket (Wal Mart), $25.00 in wire (+ $6.95 shipping), about $5.00 for the connectors. Th save myself trouble, I think I'm oing to go with this controller $22.00 plus shipping.
    #24
  5. trumpet

    trumpet Group W Bench

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    Ding!! cheap enough to justify not building your own:deal


    BTW, this circuit pdf file is buildable for about $20 in parts only handles 7.5A load, but the kits are so inexpensive there is really no reason to DIY other than
    to say "I DIY'd it". Unlike the savings on making a heated vest/jacket, IMO.
    #25
  6. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    hmmmmmmm, what do you guys think about adding heat to removeable aerostich vest sleeves, and, keeping them removeable? I'm thinking a coax at each sleeve to plug in, and, a coax at the main power to plug it all together. Use a splitter at the Aero SAE connector to plug both in, so, there's only one wire going to the bike.

    My problem is I'm much better dreaming this stuff up than implementing:lol3
    #26
  7. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    My thoughts Ed Zachery. The only reasion I would consider making my own is to have a dual controller in one box, but it's not worth the itme. I'll just get two of these.
    #27
  8. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    Do you plan on running them off of the same controller? If so, I see 2 potential problems.
    1. Current draw on your controller. Most of them can only handle 15 amps max, and
    2. Matching the heat ratio between the sleeves and vest. You will be either increasing your Rt (total resistance) if you cut into your exixting circuit and run the sleves in series, which will bring your total wattage down, OR if you put them in paralell with your existing circuit, you'll raise the amps, and total watts.

    If you used a seperate controller for the sleeves, and just run a Y cable up to them you'd have no problems.

    Hope this answers your question, but I'm not sure I understood correctly.
    #28
  9. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    Well, clearly I don't really know what I'm doing, but, it seems like running enough wire to heat the sleeves would make it roughly the same draw as a normal heated liner? I use a Heat troller. make sense?
    #29
  10. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    Yep, i did understand you correctly. How many watts is your vest rated.
    #30
  11. tslewisz

    tslewisz Long timer

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    Thank you. :thumb
    #31
  12. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    45 watts. 3.3 amps
    #32
  13. papaduc

    papaduc Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the time and effort to post the photos and such :deal

    But heck $22.00 is a very good deal for a controller. I used to use a portable one since I have multiple bikes, at that price I could mount one to each bike and still come out ahead. :clap
    #33
  14. trumpet

    trumpet Group W Bench

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    I'd been noodling a sealed controller for permanent mounting in the bikes fairing. Just have a knob, led, power switch, and connector.

    Lazy wins though, I've only been planning to do this through 3 bikes at this point.
    #34
  15. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    Interesting thread:thumb
    Just a comment, I built my own controller using a power mosfet and found I had to drop the switching frequency to the 1-10 hz range or the controller would inject a ton of noise in the intercom/audio system.
    In the application of heating control that low frequency is of no concern.
    #35
  16. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    Well if you run 20 feet (5 loops of 2 ft) for each sleeve and wire them in series for a total of 40 ft of wire, this will give you an additional 43 watts (21.5 watts per sleeve). Put this in parallel with your 45-watt vest, and you’ll be pulling just over 9 amps total on your controller. As best I can tell, most of the power MOSFETs in these are rated at 15 amps, so in theory you should be good.
    <!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--> <!--[endif]--><o:p></o:p>
    [FONT=&quot]Keep in mind though, that this is my first attempt at heated clothing, and mine is untested in actual cold weather riding. So everything I have done so far is still “in theory”[/FONT]
    #36
  17. mr_magicfingers

    mr_magicfingers Adventurer

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    Fantastic information here, think I'll be searching for some wire to run into the liners of my jacket and trousers this winter.

    Cheers,

    Justin.
    #37
  18. M2

    M2 where 2 ride today?

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    Hi,
    I decided to try one myself. I bought the same starter jacket. Did not want to order wire and wait so I used 30 ga. transformer wire. The insulation is not as thick but supposed to be good to 200 c. It fits into a large needle nicely. I used 2 forty ft lengths. One in the body and one in the sleeves. I am planning to connect those in parallel. Two things I found that made the installation of the wire easier. One was to plan where the wires go and mark with a silver sharpie. You can use the marks to estimate wire length. Second was to have wife wear jacket turned inside out while I wired up the jacket. Better than working with jacket spread out on table. I didn't stick her to many times.
    I tested the jacket connected to a battery and seemed to work fine. I will borrow a meter to check amps later. Now I need to decide on connectors, controller, etc.

    Mike
    #38
  19. M2

    M2 where 2 ride today?

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    I can find Plugs that are either 9.5mm or 14mm long. Which one would work?
    There seems to be only one 5.5 X 2.5 jack size.

    http://www.action-electronics.com/dcpowerplugs.htm


    Thanks

    Mike
    #39
  20. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    I went with "Size N". UPS Tracker says my controllers (PWM's) Will be in tomorrow, so if the temp stays the same here (40's in the am) I'll be able to give it all a good test run this weekend.
    #40