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$35.00 Heated Jacket Liner (DIY)

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by 65 Flathead, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. Xeraux

    Xeraux Archvillain

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    Where I need to be.
    I got it from your link. I see where I messed up, though. I was looking at the wrong gauge. 10 gauge is US$55.17 for 25'.
  2. Mikef5000

    Mikef5000 Long timer

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    Columbus, OH
    Purchased my stuff today!

    100' of wire from here: http://www.bulkwire.com/wire-cable/ptfe-high-temperature-stranded-wire.html
    [​IMG]

    4 Connectors from here:http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=090-479
    [​IMG]

    And 4 Plugs with a 6' pigtail: http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=090-492
    [​IMG]

    The plan is to wire up my riding suit, my buddies riding suit, and my girlfriends jacket, each with 33' of heated cord and a heavy gauge wire coming out with the plug on the end.

    I'll put two connectors in my big bike that's used for 2-up, one in my solo bike, and one on my buddies for his heated suit.

    I'm going to run sans-controller at first and see what happens. If it's overly hot, I'll add an inline switch. My previous gear has never been overly hot though, I'd just pull the plug if needed. We'll cross that bridge when we get to it... which I'm not expecting.

    Looking forward to doing some sewing! :D
  3. Mikef5000

    Mikef5000 Long timer

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    Hah! Recieved the riding suit today! Already had the electrical stuff, so I couldn't leave well enough alone.

    Within the first 12 hours of owning a brand new (first lot out of the factory) Teiz Lombard V3, I had sewn wires into the liner. Was it necessary? Probably not, This thing looks warm! Was it worth the $10 and couple hours (from 11:00pm to 1:00am)? Heck yeah!

    I focused on the front, with the intentions of fighting the cold wind. Laid wires from the shoulders to the knees across both sides. With just a could stripes across the upper back.

    [​IMG]
    Heated Wires by Mikef5000, on Flickr


    If it's uncomfortable (too hot on the front and/or to cold on the arms/back) I'll un-solder it and reroute it.

    Can't wait to test it out!
  4. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    Oct 3, 2009
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    I'm interested to see how this turns out. I was just thinking about this on a frosty ride home. IMHO, you will not be satisfied with this arrangement.

    The heating elements in heated clothing need to be as close to the skin as possible, You only have so much power (wattage) to play with, and putting the wire as close to your body as possible is more efficient. By putting the wires in your outer garment, you would have to heat the air inside the suit to keep warm. You don't have enough power to do this unless you have a truck alternator strapped to your hack somewhere. Think also, that you'll want to put on additional insulating layers for really cold weather. With your “in the suit design”, you'll effectively be insulating yourself from the heat.

    If it worked though, it would be much more convenient than my base layer style for daily commuting.
  5. Lotus54

    Lotus54 Ngana

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    More wire will produce LESS heat. More wire (of same resistance) will have more total resistance.
    More resistance = less current = less Watts= less head.

    Maybe you meant move more toward the front?
  6. theWolfTamer

    theWolfTamer Lupie on a Mission

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    No, what I meant was the single stranded wire is rated to a produce higher temps at the same wattage as the multi stranded. I started with 30ft and wanted to be sure that was sufficient. It wasn't so I added an additional 15ft to the front.
  7. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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  8. theWolfTamer

    theWolfTamer Lupie on a Mission

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    Firmly planted in the Georgia red clay
  9. _cy_

    _cy_ Long timer

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    any long term feedback yet?
  10. theWolfTamer

    theWolfTamer Lupie on a Mission

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    I'm very pleased with the stuff I made. On my last ride I was warmer on the bike than off of it! I think if you have the time diy is worth it. On my jacket and pant liners I used the SAE dual connectors because that's what I had. One minor problem is the SAE connector is when that thing is connected, it's connected. It ain't coming off and you ain't walking away with it still connected. You'll pull the bike over first!

    Gonna swap those out for some DC Coax ones like these:
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Then add one of these [​IMG] so I can connect the pant liner when needed.

    Click on pics for link to site.

    The bonus is have stuff left over to make extra sets and repairs if needed although I haven't had to repair anything yet.
  11. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    I’m on the 3rd winter on my original jacket and heat controller. Commuting around 800 – 1k miles per month, I calculate that I have around 12k miles of use from my gear and both the controller and jacket have worked flawlessly. Even in ice and snow (yes, we get that sometimes in Louisiana) I have never had to run it full blast.
    I have had a few hiccups with the gloves, but after I switched from the DC Coax to the SAE connectors, I’ve had no more Issues. I can’t find any solder on Coax connectors that will handle the current the gloves draw for more than a few months before they start to loose connection. I am actually considering purchasing some Warm and Safe gloves though. I was never fully satisfied with my home made ones. It was just too much trouble getting enough wire threaded thru the gloves without compromising the waterproofing.
  12. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    Have you tried injecting RTV Silicone into the connector body and assembling? I makes them much more rugged.
    2 part 5 minute epoxy works well too.
    Really helps with the waterproofing as well.
    Also applies to Intercom connectors.
  13. MattR302

    MattR302 Awesomeness, Inc.

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    I started to make my own heated jacket about 2-3 years ago, never got around to putting the connector on the end of it and finishing it up. I believe I used about 33' of 30awg teflon wire i bought on Ebay. I ended up getting a pair of firstgear carbon heated gloves for 50% at a local Kawi dealer. They tried to sell me the wiring and the controller, but I had to insist that I didnt want them.

    I ended up making a simple OFF-LOW-HIGH controller. I used one of those plastic radio shack project boxes, with a center-off toggle switch. Flip the toggle switch up, its wired directly to the battery for 100% heat. Flip the toggle switch down, its wired through a turn signal relay inside the project box for about a 50% on-off pulse width, for a low heat setting.
  14. LBS Bandit

    LBS Bandit Been here awhile

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    Here is one for ya! I have 25ft of 22ga wire. I would love to use it for a heated shell but the wire is only .4 ohms for the whole length. Can I put a resister inline, and if so should it be a certain type? By my calculations if I put a 2 ohm resister (2.4 total) in there at about 13 volts that will give me a wattage of 70.46. Any input would be much appreciated.
  15. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    The resistor would dissipate about 59watts and the wire 11watts.

    Your Jacket would be cold and the resistor (100w rated) would be about 6" long /1" in diameter and smokin' hot :lol3

    You must use resistance wire or use 150' of your copper:eek1
  16. LBS Bandit

    LBS Bandit Been here awhile

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    .....................Guess I'm ordering some 30ga tomorrow.
  17. 65 Flathead

    65 Flathead Been here awhile

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    Yea, but the only connectors I had at time of assymbly were not very good quality. :cry I still have coax on my controller, but I use SAE from controller to battery and from harness to glove. I still use the coax on the jacket also with no problems.
  18. Mambo Dave

    Mambo Dave I cannot abide.

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    Wouldn't modulating through a potentiometer or, using a multiple-way switch, using different values of resistors accomplish the same thing? I mean, that pulse-width thing is neat, sorta, but then I have to wonder what hell the constant bang-bang-bang of current draws is doing to the bike's recharging system... they just don't seem as strong as automobile charging systems.
  19. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    Any series resistance will get hot and the resistors need to be quite large.
    What he has done with the flasher is create a cheap PWM controller with a 50% duty cycle.
    Not a bad low$ idea.
  20. MattR302

    MattR302 Awesomeness, Inc.

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    yes, a pot would accomplish the same thing, or different resistors, but the problem with that is that you're losing energy to the resistors in the form of heat (the resistors will get hot). If you're not worried about that, you're not running multiple accessories, and you can mount the resistor in a way to dissipate the heat, then go for it.

    The pulse-width-modulation is how the real heat-troller dealies work. For example, for 25% power, the controller would be "ON" for 25% of the time (say 250 milliseconds), and "OFF" for 75% of the time (750 milliseconds). What I did with the turn signal relay, is with a rough 50% PWM cyce. Doing it this way, you're not losing power to any resistors.