4 broken ribs and collapsed lung... fighting fear now

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by TwinCitiesRider, May 25, 2019.

  1. oldspice1972

    oldspice1972 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    May 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    433
    Location:
    iowa city, ia
    Crashed my RT last summer on the BRP some 900+ miles from home. Both the deer and the bike didn't make it. I had a couple minor scrapes thanks to good gear and the fact that I was wearing it! As an MSF RiderCoach, I was very leery of what I would be like back on a bike - and I certainly didn't want to be twitchy in front of a batch of students. So, a couple days after I got back, I went over to the range, pulled a bike out of the trailer, and rode around the parking lot for a bit, just to see what it would be like. I was happy that I seemed A-OK. Then, a couple days later, I took a test ride on a new RT and, again, was happy that I had no fear issues while riding.

    I do, to this day, still get nervous about riding near sunrise or sunset, even in the car, because of all the deer around here. Even though my accident was in the middle of the day, I start to get the deer sweats around 7:30pm nowadays. So, even though I'm fine on the bike, I'm super cautious of what might be coming out of the ditches. Side to side, far and near to the max for me!
    #41
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  2. thanosgp

    thanosgp Xr rules

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2016
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    Location:
    Greece
    well written :beer
    #42
  3. snowjob

    snowjob Thinking about bikes....

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    Sep 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
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    Verona
    I had a similar crash 20 months ago that resulted in a broken spine. The back pain is a continuous reminder of the risk and the accident. I have ridden since and although not crippled with fear, the enjoyment is greatly reduced. I am still hopeful about recovery, riding and even racing again, but it takes time. I still love it too much to walk away, though it may different than it was in the past. Pretty sure when I was 27, crashing had no impact :-)
    #43
  4. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
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    Location:
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    What you could have done is NEVER entered that intersection at 35 mph. At that speed you have no time to react, even if you were covering the brake, much less scrub speed.

    If there is any oncoming traffic I drop speed to less than 10 MPH. I have even stopped completely here and there rather than crossing another vehicles potential path. I do this well before the intersection to avoid being rear ended. There is no such thing as right of way when it's 400 lbs vs. 2500 lbs.

    Riding with this level of defensiveness (tame paranoia) doesn't make riding around town much fun. So I don't do it. At total risk of being flamed, commuting on a motorcycle is dumb (with some exceptions where traffic is silly and lane splitting is legal). It puts you at the highest risk for the most miles in the lowest fun factor environment. I dribble directly out of town pissing everybody off and head for the canyons where the risk/fun ratio (during the week) is a whole lot better.

    Cars can be used to your advantage. If there are two lanes in your direction always be in the right wheel track of the right lane (US*), That is, farthest from the left turn killers. Then enter the intersection with a car on your left. They are big, visible and will block for you. With one lane in your direction try to not be the first vehicle across the intersection. As long as you are going to be invisible, be so behind something big.

    *adjust for weird countries where they drive on the wrong side of the road.
    #44
  5. snowjob

    snowjob Thinking about bikes....

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,129
    Location:
    Verona
    Sadly, your assessment rings partially true. After my accident I did conclude that commuting and city riding are no longer worth the risk. Between the influx of people to my city that are completely unfamiliar with it and their aggressive driving style, I concluded the only way I could have avoided my accident was by not commuting on bike. It really saddens me as I have gotten great joy out of nearly 25 years of commuting. The risk/reward ratio is just no longer worth it. This also means each bike sees less use, which has started a downsizing project......not necessarily a bad thing. At one point I was up to 10 bikes and now I anticipate having only 2 once the rest are sold.
    #45
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