4000 Kilometers across South Africa and Lesotho

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by TheRuleOfThump, Apr 6, 2019.

  1. TheRuleOfThump

    TheRuleOfThump ..... and the road becomes my throne !

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Germany
    Hey Inmates, Howzit !

    It has been a while since we returned from our ride across South Africa and Lesotho over the Christmas holidays of 2018. My name is Naveen and along with my buddy Nicolas we spent 12 days riding across South Africa starting at Johannesburg, through Lesotho and ending our adventure at the lovely city of Cape Town. This was the first time I was on a tour this long and I hope my words do justice to the joy and pleasure that we experienced during our journey.

    This also happens to be my first ever ride report. I intend to do it in parts instead of one large thread. If you find my content to your liking or have anything at all that you would like to say, I would like to hear from you in the comments.

    Cheers.

    Day 1 – The arrival of our beasts of burden

    We had spent our first few days in South Africa doing what all tourists do. City tours, museums and safaris. On the day we returned from our Safari we were treated to the sight of a pickup truck with two beautiful motorcycles on its flatbed. After getting the machines on the ground, we were told by the delivery person that the battery of what would be my motorcycle for the next 12 days was dead. Not a great start I know but nothing that a quick phone call to the rental company couldn’t fix.

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    Day 2 – Johannesburg, South Africa to Roma, Lesotho – 480 KM

    The nice lady at the rental company arranged for one of their managers to replace the battery. He arrived in the morning to switch the batteries and this resulted us in starting our tour a couple of hours later than planned. We did the routine check and were finally locked, loaded and ready to roll.

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    Soon after we rolled out of the lodge, right around the first corner Nicolas loses his balance and lays the bike on the floor and he rolls on to the grass by the sidewalk. We lifted it up with some effort and continued our journey. What an amazing start.

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    The ride out of Joburg wasn't anything exciting. The ride was long and uneventful apart from dust devils in the distance, strong winds and the draft when a truck passed by. Around 40 km before Bethlehem my tank light lit up. I wasn't sure how long I could go on reserve before the bike would stall. We kept riding until we decided to stop and look for a gas station on the GPS. The next one was at Bethlehem that was 10 km away. From there the border control point at Caledonspoort wasn't far away and we arrived at the immigration at the border not too long after.

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    We parked the motorcycles and stood in queue like the rest of them to get our passports stamped. We were the only foreigners as far as I could see. After getting our exit stamps we rolled into Lesotho where we had to go go through the same procedure to get in. Stand in queue and get the stamp. We then drive past the gate and right into Lesotho with a wonderful view of the mountains and rock formations.

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    The reception in our phone was dead as we had no roaming on our plan. We drove through some little towns and the roads and views were getting better by the kilometer. We stopped a couple of times to take a few pictures. Nicolas even tried his drone but the winds were far too strong to control the drone. We decided to take a turn before Maseru and bypass the capital entirely.

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    After a while the road ran out and it was just dirt and gravel. After confirming with Nicolas if this indeed was the right way we got up on our pegs and drive down the trail with big smiles on our faces. Our first off-road track on our tour.

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    It was quite fun until the asphalt began on the other end of our trail. The winding roads and incredible views kept us happy though until we arrived at our stop for the night, Roma. The Roma Trading Post lodge is an old base set up for trading in the mountains which now serves as a lodge for travellers visiting Roma.

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    For the record, just before arriving at the lodge we had to ride up a mildly rocky incline. A car coming our way didnt seem like he was going to stop and before I knew it the motorcycle was lying on its side. Guess Nicolas and I are even and equally embarassed. That was pretty much it for our first day on the road.
    #1
  2. TheRuleOfThump

    TheRuleOfThump ..... and the road becomes my throne !

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Germany
    Before I continue I guess it is important to take a look at the map to have an idea of the route that we took.

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    Day 3 - Roma - Semonkong - 88 km

    Today we planned on going to the Maletsunyane waterfalls close to Semonkong. Since we were leaving early we didn't have breakfast in Roma. We packed our bags and left them at the reception so that we can pick them up on our way to Katse. The drive to Maletsunyane was rather beautiful. Great streets and the incredible landscape of Lesotho. We had to do a bit of off roading to get to the viewpooint.

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    Being summer there seemed to be not much water at the falls. Nevertheless the canyon and the falls offered a breathtaking view from where we were standing.

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    There was a kid, his two dogs and a puppy watching us do whatever it is that two crazy people who clearly weren't from this neighbourhood were doing.

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    Once we were done we decided to stop by at the Semonkong lodge to get something to eat. Unfortunately when we got there the lady told us that the kitchen was closed. We also needed to find some fuel to fill for the motorcycles.

    After some asking around we managed find a shack where they sold 93 petrol. They don't have 95 in Lesotho. After 5 litres each in the two tanks we left for Roma. The drive back was stunning as well and soon that was about to change.

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    Suddenly on our way back Nicolas said that he felt his rear tyre was slipping. We then noticed that he had a flat tyre. Terrible timing and very inconvenient. We stopped to take a look and the culprit was a nail which he probably picked up close to the fuel shack in Semonkong. We were in the middle of nowhere and had to quickly think of a way around this dilemma.

    We had tubes in our tyres and therefore a quick fix wasn't going to cut it. We had neither tyre irons nor tubes with us. Rookie mistake.

    Lesson learnt:
    If ever planning on going off the grid and off-roading:
    1. Carry Tubes
    2. Tyre Irons
    3. CO2

    I decided to head out and look for a spot to park the bike. There was a small village close by with a population of maybe 20 and I asked Nicolas to try and ride until there. We didn't want to just leave the bike by the side of the road. He managed to get there and with some signs and symbols with the people we agreed to park it there. The two of us then drove two up all the way back to Roma.

    This was just the beginning of our Flat Tyre Ordeal in Lesotho.

    Next time ---> Faith in Mankind restored !!!
    #2
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  3. TheRuleOfThump

    TheRuleOfThump ..... and the road becomes my throne !

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
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    Day 3 - Continued...

    Back at the lodge we asked the lady at the reception if she could assist us in any way to find a mechanic to repair the flat. She quickly got hold of some guys in the vicinity who agreed to help us. She walks with us half way to show us the place and a guy in blue overalls met with us and took us to the workshop where he works. There seemed to be a bunch of cars and tractors there that seemed to require some repairing. They wanted to bring the motorcycle back to Roma to get it fixed. We asked them if they could try and repair it where we left it so that Nicolas could ride it back. We weren't really sold on the bringing it back on a pickup truck part. They agreed and we showed them the rear wheel of my motorcycle so that they could take the right tools with them. In the end they just packed all the tools that they had lying around.

    We thought that it's just gonna be one guy and the two of us. We realised we were wrong when the entire gang got into the car. Nicolas and I were on flat bed at the back with two other guys and a large compressor taking most of the place. The driver and another guy were in the front. We were a total of 6 guys in the Hilux. The mechanics seemed to be enjoying the landscape and scenery of their lovely country just as much as we did from the back of the truck. Quite an experience.

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    When we arrived at the spot the whole team got to work immediately. It seemed to us like these guys have never laid hands on a motorcycle let alone repair one. Their support however was not something we could appreciate enough. We tried to fix the tube but it seemed like the nozzle had ripped right off. The nail had torn the tube as Nicolas drove it the last few hundred metres to the village.

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    After a quick discussion we hauled the motorcycle on to the flatbed. These guys made some of the most amazing knots with their ropes to tether the motorcycle to the car.

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    After they were done there seemed to be no more place for six guys on the car. Fortunately a taxi had just stopped to drop someone off and the two of us along with a mechanic took the taxi to Roma. Half an hour later the guys arrived and we lowered the bike from the car and placed it next to mine. I got them a round of drinks for their help.

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    In the meantime a neighbour had arrived to inspect the situation and offered to give us a tube from his motorcycle. We were once again hopeful. They boys removeed the wheel from his motorcycle but his tube was larger than what we had and was also in need of some patchwork. The entire procedure seemed to be taking forever. In the end it looked like the whole thing hadn't worked out as we could still hear air leaking from the tyre. The good neighbour, Sekake, offered to take us to Maseru the following day to find a new tube for us.

    Back at the lodge I contacted the rental company and spoke to them about our problem. They had BMW on call but they offered their services only in South Africa. For that we would have had to drive 50 km from Roma to the nearest town in South Africa. Without a wheel or any sort of temporary solution this didn't seem feasible. We were hoping that our new friend Sekake would drag us out of this mishap.

    Day 4 - Part 1 - Roma - Maseru - Roma

    First thing we did after we woke up was to walk straight to Sekake's place.As soon as he saw us he picked his phone and called the store in Maseru. He then held the phone to our ears for us to listen to the recorded message “We are closed and away for the holidays. Will be back in January”. That was bad news indeed. Sesake thought for a moment and quickly dialed another number to see if he can help us. He then turned to us and told us that a friend of his who's got a workshop and is a biker himself might have a spare at home. He said that he was waiting for him to return his call and tell him if the spare that he has is indeed the right size. We decided to meet again in an hour if he did have the right sized tube. We went back to the lodge and waited for breakfast. Skeptical about the whole situation I tried to look for shops in Ladybrand in South Africa and see if they could be of any help. As we were eating our breakfast the lady at the reception came and told us that Sekake was asking for us. We rushed to him to hear the news and he said “ Yes, my friend has got the right sized spare tube for your tyre. We must leave now”. This was music to our ears and we quickly gulped down what was left of our breakfast and rushed to go get the tyre fixed. By then Sekake had already loaded the tyre in his car and was waiting for us. The three of us then quickly drove down to his friend's workshop just a few kilometres before Maseru.

    When we arrived we were treated to a stable full of v-stroms and other motorcycles. This gave us the confidence that the the man in charge knew what he was dealing with. After a few minutes of waiting Sekake's friend emerges with a new tube and tells us that he would like 300 Rand for it to which we agreed to without the slightest hesitation. The man then got to work immediately. As he was working the radio in the background says “Tough times never last. It's all about how hard you fought back”. This little quote couldn't have been said out loud at a more appropriate time. In less than 20 minutes the tyre was ready with the new tube. Nicolas and I were overjoyed by how things were turning out and I insisted that I take a couple of pictures with the men who saved our road trip.

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    Sekake. We have no idea what we would've done if it wasn't for Sekake's generosity. He also happens to be a ADV rider. I guess he knew what we were going through.

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    Sekake's friend who swapped the tubes for us. Very professional and clean job.

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    After we were back at the lodge the three of us put the tyre back where it belonged and Sekake bolted it tightly in place. The BMW was brought back to life.

    Words cannot do justice to the help and support Sekake and the boys at the Bros. and Sons panel beating and spray company offered us. They simply went out of their way to get two guys back on the road and explore their country in all its beauty. One of the boys even said “ We've been paid for our job but we're unhappy that the deed hasn't been done. We'd be happy only when you guys get to where you want to journey to”. I doubt if more needs to be said to prove that kindness in mankind exists and is real. I am simply flabbergasted each time complete strangers turn out to be the exact people that one needs in their life at that precise moment.

    On one hand this little problem made us call of our highly anticipated ride through the infamous Sani Pass. On the other hand this was a lesson to all those who question the kindness of people beyond borders, seas, continents and cultures. We couldn't have asked for a better adventure. Africa has been good to us.

    Next time ---> Maybe we missed Sani but we weren't prepared for the spectacular Qacha's Nek !

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    #3
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  4. TheRuleOfThump

    TheRuleOfThump ..... and the road becomes my throne !

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Germany
    Day 4 - Part 2 - Roma - Semonkong - Qacha's - Shelly Beach, South Africa - 470 Km

    After buying ourselves an extra hour to checkout we were back in our room to pack and hit the road as soon as possible. We loaded the motorcycles and stopped at the reception to pay our dues. I thanked the nice ladies at the reception for all their help and even excused ourselves for being such difficult guests. Soon we were back on the street and the first stop was to fuel the machines before turning around and riding down the same street towards Semonkong for the fifth time before driving through Qacha and over the border to South Africa.

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    The entire stretch from Roma to Qacha is truly a motorcyclist's dream. Perfect streets and the kingdom in the sky doesn't cheap out on the corners, turns and switchbacks. Not to mention the views along the way that are guaranteed to take your breath away. We couldn't be happier to have journeyed through this magnificent country and met it's beautiful people. Simply grateful. Before long we were standing in a long queue to get our passports stamped and finally when it was our turn the lady said we were in the wrong queue and the one for the entry stamp is the short one. We were however in a state of mind to be not brought down by such trivial things today although we knew that we had a long way to go until we arrive at Shelly beach.

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    The Border Control Point before crossing over to South Africa.

    Right after immigration we were greeted by a 30 km stretch of gravel that never seemed to end. We were sure we should be the ones least worried about getting to the other side considering the other vehicles we came across on our way down. We remember telling how many countless impalas we had seen at the Madikwe Game Reserve when Nicolas jokingly said that the impalas were replaced by sheep in Lesotho and while back in KwaZulu-Natal they were now cows.

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    We were planning on going scuba diving at Shelly Beach. Right at the end of the gravel road we stopped to fill our tanks and call the dive shop to inform them that we were planning on diving with them the following day. I ran out of talktime but fortunately managed to get the message across. The ride to Shelly was pretty much cruising down the beautiful streets in South Africa until we arrived at a section where were at around 1500m in the mountains and were riding through the clouds. We could hardly see 50m ahead of us and it seemed like the day wasn't done with testing our endurance. This was also evident towards the end when it started to rain while negotiating another gravel track on the final leg towards Shelly beach. The GoPro's battery was dead and we sadly have no photos or footage of the ride that gave us sunshine, strong winds, clouds, fog and rain all in one day.

    We were finally at Shelly beach looking for a place to stay. We managed to eventually get in touch with the lady at Mount Joy where they accommodated us in a “Basic room” with an attached bath and toilet. The term basic here is surely a little underrated. For two guys who were wanting to take a break after a tiring day an open bath in the room wasn't making things easier. We decided to take turns and wait at the hall downstairs while each one took a shower upstairs. On the plus side our bikes had a premium parking spot that we could see from our window.

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    After we were done we walked to the nearest place we could find some food. We ended up at a bar that seemed like a place where they could have some good food. We ordered some burgers and beers. The burgers were not exactly burgers but were without doubt delicious.

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    We sat there talking about our day and the days ahead of us before heading back to our guest house to get some much needed rest. Can't wait to go diving with sharks.
    #4
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  5. TheRuleOfThump

    TheRuleOfThump ..... and the road becomes my throne !

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Germany
    Day 5 - Shelly Beach - Port St. Johns - 250 Km

    The alarm rings and we are up at quarter past 5. We pack all our stuff so that we can vacate the room and get to the dive shop in time. There is a message on my phone and I wait until I'm done to check it. The text on the display reads “No diving today. Strong winds. Bad weather. Sad smiley face”. We were simply disappointed to hear this today. It's one of the things we were truly looking forward to on our journey across South Africa. The Protea Banks is probably the only place we would have had the chance to sight hammerheads, zambezis, tigers and raggies. Unlike further down the western Cape, the Protea Banks offered proper scuba diving and not cage diving for tourists seeking a thrill. The shark diving topic is a highly debated one that should be discussed somewhere else. Anyway it looks like I need to head back to South Africa to more than just conquer the Sani Pass.

    We decided to get some more sleep before breakfast at 8 and then continue with our journey. The next stop on our tour was Port St. Johns. Before we left though we had one quick errand to run and that was to get our deposit back from the dive shop. After breakfast we took a walk at the beach and we could confirm that the dive shop was serious about the strong winds blowing this morning. There were a few people in the water while some just laid back and relaxed.

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    The dive shop was around 800m by foot and we walked there in less than 15 minutes to get our money back. The deposit saved us the effort of finding a cash machine. We took the route right across the beach to get to our lodge and the manager was delighted about the prospect of getting some cash in his register that morning. The nice lady at the reception gave us an hour's extension to vacate the room and by around 10:45 AM were on the lawn with all our stuff and ready to load our beasts of burden.

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    While we were loading our luggage a gentleman in a straw hat was interested in where we were headed to and gave us some value advice about places to avoid and places we shouldn't miss. There was a German couple who had driven to port St John's and Coffee Bay by car and mentioned that it was a terrible experience. Straw hat man said that those places weren't the couple's cup of tea but on the other hand for a couple of dudes on GSs it was probably exactly what we were looking for. The girl in the couple asked Nicolas "Is it any fun to be travelling on those bikes ?". Nicolas and I would later end up quoting this exact question everytime the ride put a massive smile on our faces. Straw hat man then opens the gate for us and we hit the gas station first before our long ride ahead.

    Cruising down the beautifully tarred streets and taking in the the magnificent landscape of the wild coast should be on every motorcyclists bucket list. From the notorious South African taxis invading the streets to the countless speed bumps along the way we had our fair share of challenges to be aware of. The crowded streets in the bigger towns we had to pass on the way brought back memories of a time I had to negotiate my way through the the chaos that Indian streets are on my tiny Yamaha and today it was pretty much the same but on a fatter BMW. Around 30 km before port St John's I happened to notice a banner that read “only 168 turns until the next Spar”. Little did I know that the fun was just getting started. True to its word the corners began appearing one by one with each one turning our ride into one that we'd remember for a long time to come.

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    168 turns later we spotted a sign directing travelers to the Amapondo backpacker hostel. 4 km down the road we arrived at what could be our accomodation for the night provided they still have a room for us. We park the 800s and walk to the reception where we were greeted by the now all too familiar “Howzit?!”. 2 young black South Africans greet us and show us to the one and only private room available today. We take it without a moment's notice and proceed to get the paperwork and payment done. We drop all the luggage in the room and head out to look for a drink or something to eat. We change into our shorts and t-shirts and ride out to look for a place to unwind at.

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    Riding down the beach road we notice several families spending their Saturday grilling up a decent braai (South African barbecue) and the youth shake a leg to the music blaring from their speakers from all directions. The road seemed to end there and the gravel began. We ride up a little hill until Nicolas said that we missed the turn to the a restaurant he had in mind. We turn back and head in the right direction this time and are faced with the ultimate question of whether we want to chill at the Wood'n’Spoon or at the Delicious Monster. The delicious Monster sounded quite intriguing and we ended up riding up a slightly steep slope to get to the monster's mouth where we parked the bikes and went in to check the place out.

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    The Land Rover's license plate reads "ZH" which I assume is Zürich. I'd like to believe the owner had his own great adventure driving all the way from Switzerland and to the Defender's final resting place at Port St. John's.

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    At the bar I call out to see if anyone would care to be.of service and a young girl emerged from the rear and told us that the kitchen would open in 4 hours but that she would gladly serve us some drinks and also that we were welcome to relax there at their beautiful outdoor setting. We had a bunch of electronic equipment with us to save our media from our cameras over on the hard drive. After some deep pondering Nicolas decides to fly his drone to capture some aerial shots of the bay and hills around it. A quick 10 minute flight and we were back to chilling.

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    While paying a visit to the terrible excuse of a toilet I noticed that there were peculiar marijuana like plants growing here and there. Wonder what the residents of the delicious monster are upto. After a while boredom got the better of me and I insisted that we take a walk or go elsewhere where we could maybe eat already or do something rather than just sit around. I pay the girl at the bar and ask her directions to the beach. She shows me the way and in around 10 minutes we found ourselves at the beach. We walked around a little and once again took a look around at the families with their cars, music and braai however this time on foot.

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    Back at the delicious monster we saw a new face who took up the job of being the waiter for the evening. I ask him if it still was too early to order. He informs me that the chef wasn't there yet but he could take our orders so that the kitchen could get right to it once they were open for business. After 2 cappuccinos, few pita bread slices with hummus, a burger with fries for Nicolas, lemonade and fresh carp from the line with vegetables and rice for me, the sun went down on an evening well spent following a good day of riding. On the way back we had to ride in the slight rain and Nicolas had a tough time seeing through the darkness and a pair of wet spectacles. Fortunately the hostel was just around the corner and then I walk up to the gate before taking the heavy GS up the slope. Just as I thought. The gate was locked. Captain foresight ! Would've been uncomfortable hanging around on the slope with a heavy motorcycle beneath me. The gateman lets us in and instructs us to park our bikes at the lot but it seemed like there wasn't a good enough spot for my machine. He says I can drive it up and park it close to the bar. Premium parking.

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    Premium Parking.

    We then quickly hit the showers and spend the rest of the evening talking about random topics while downing a couple of drinks. Back in the room were now ready to rest our weary heads. Next Stop --> Morgan's Bay.
    #5
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  6. ThirtyOne

    ThirtyOne I got my wings back. Supporter

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    Nice report. :beer
    #6
  7. TheRuleOfThump

    TheRuleOfThump ..... and the road becomes my throne !

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
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    18
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    Germany
    Thanks. Glad you liked it :-)
    #7
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  8. TheRuleOfThump

    TheRuleOfThump ..... and the road becomes my throne !

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Germany
    Day 6 - Morgan Bay - 280 km

    Breakfast was at 8 and we got some coffee with our eggs, bacon and cheese toasties. By 9 we were back in the room packing our stuff and preparing to check out before 10. After packing everything up I noticed that I couldn't find my ROK straps. I then more or less undid everything i just managed to pack and still never managed to find them. They were however in my hydration backpack the whole time. After another 15 minutes of repacking we were outside loading the luggage on to the racks of our beasts of burden. One last thing left to do was to fill the hydration pack, return the towels and collect the deposit. The nice guys at the bar let me fill water at the bar and even told me I could throw in some ice if I so pleased. Before long we were on our way to Morgan Bay.

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    Amapondo Backpackers at Port St. John's. Great place with friendly staff.

    We rode the 280 km stretch in around 6 hours with sufficient time to relax in between. Everywhere we looked the landscape was covered with rolling hills with tiny settlements on them. One time we stopped by the side of the road on an empty plot of land to stretch our limbs and take a short break before journeying on. Right next to where we were standing were a few horses grazing without any of the troubles in life. Just happy horses. At least so I assume.

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    That is total of around 180 Horsepower in this picture

    Our next pit stop was a gas station 70 km before Morgan's bay. We got some juice from the shop at the station and a couple of lollipops. Don't quite remember the last time I had a lollipop. We then filled up our tanks before moving on to Morgan bay which included a decent 30 Kilometers of gravel. It is always exciting to go off-road. The only issue is the fatigue the arms and legs feel after standing up and riding for a long time. Not to mention my top fitness level (being sarcastic incase you didn't assume that already).

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    At the end of the gravel road we see cars lined up for what appeared to be a queue to get on a raft to be ferries across a small bay. I assume that going around it would've been a time consuming process if at all possible. We jumped the queue to jump on the the next ride across along with two cars. Some of the car drivers were polite enough to ask us to go straight ahead instead of standing in the queue while a couple others, as usual, weren't too pleased to see two motorcycle have an unfair advantage. It was always 2 cars at a time and there also seemed to be passengers on foot coming our way. The ride costed us 40 Rand each and soon we were on the other side. As soon as we hit the ground we fire up our engines, turn around and pull on the gas to ride right past the other cars taking it easy on the secondary roads. A motorcycle capable of cruising down the highway and clearing dirt roads with the same amount of ease is definitely a joy to ride in these parts of the world.

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    Arriving in Morgan bay, we as usual had the slightest clue as to where we were going to spend the night. Riding around the little town we noticed that it was yet another coastal town that shared no similarities either with Shelly Beach nor with Port St. John's. This one seemed like it was catering to the white population of South Africa belonging to a higher class. After a bit of riding around and searching we made up our mind to follow the signs to the Morgan Bay Backpackers establishment. We rode our bikes into a parking spot and walked to the reception to find out if they had any accomodation available for two guys. The two ladies there were quite busy with some other customers. The younger one though turned to us as soon as she was done and told us that there were only campsites and beds in dorms available. Sean the manager would have more information on his computer was the next update that we received and soon Sean got to looking it up and declared us lucky for he did have a little bush camp cottage for two people available. Only because a customer had canceled his stay this very morning. Right place at the right time I guess. The young African girl at the reception went ahead and filled up the information she needed from and proceeded to show us our room.

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    This is unfortunately the only picture I have of Morgan Bay Backpackers. It's a nice camp site. The owner and the starff were friendly. I would go there again.

    We quickly changed into something less uncomfortable and hopped back on the motorcycles to ride back into town. Once we got there we noticed that some cars were driving up a hill to the top of a cliff. It didn't look like there was a proper road even which made it even more attractive to us. We get up on the pegs and pull the throttle to ride up the dirt road. There were some people on horses coming towards us and I believe it is common etiquette to shut the engine down when horses are close by. Loud motorcycle engines could probably freak them out and throw their rider into the bush. While I was honouring this little code Nicolas was just being a totally ignorant schmuck and rode on without halting. Soon I was right behind him and we made it to the top in no time. Just as we got there we felt the winds were unusually strong and was almost strong enough to throw us off the other end of the cliff.

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    After taking in the incredible views and pictures we rode back down to the rocks and spent a few more minutes there before going to “the Tides” to get ourselves some warm beverages and snacks before dinner.

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    A rocky coastline. The waves were crashing down on the rocks. I'd imagine if it were a sandy beach the place would be crawling with surfers. I don't know. I am not a surfer.

    The waiter suggested we should try the chicken and ribs snack bowl. The food had disappeared as quickly as it had arrived. It surely was delicious. Back at the backpackers we had a quick shower and gathered some of the electronic stuff to transfer data and took a seat by the bar/restaurant. We ordered some dinner and drinks and spent the rest of the evening just relaxing. Next Stop --> Port Elizabeth.
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