640 ADV Scotts under bar mount interest?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by SoilSampleDave, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. craigincali

    craigincali I'll try it.

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    I know Emig makes one but, I would rather give my hard earned cash to a member of this board over a Company, that was why I was asking you. I guess I will go the Emig route. Thanks for your honesty regarding the price.

    Craig
    #81
  2. hubilado

    hubilado Motoquiero Super Supporter

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    In looking for the UBM for the new 640 I asked ER if their setup would accommodate a Scotts...as I have one, answer was "no". Reason was the damper mounting screw pattern was / is quite different. So I opted for their complete setup. Anyone want a 6-year-old Scotts (send me a PM)?
    #82
  3. Surly

    Surly surly adventurer

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    si senor
    all paid for and now just waiting for the boat
    remember how I didnt want to ride yours??? This is why :evil
    #83
  4. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

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    just pm me your info and i'll add you to the list... without checking you're about #7 i believe.
    #84
  5. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

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    i apreciate that doode :thumb ... but i aint in this for money. i'm doing it to make more stuff available for our bikes. i just break even on this stuff, and some of it costs me money. if a company makes something that is as good, or better than i can for our bikes at the same cost... kinda pointless for me to go hard on it.

    now having said that... i'll do a run of 25 if i get 15 interested parties.
    #85
  6. flyshop

    flyshop Been here awhile

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    Come on guys need a couple more to sign up, think we are about half way there.
    #86
  7. SoilSampleDave

    SoilSampleDave Dr. Zaius was right!

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    While Gary Emig (Jeff Emig's dad) may be incorporated, it ain't exactly like buying from Wal-Mart. If it was, it wouldn't have taken until today for everything to get here! It just didn't seem like the signup sheet was moving quickly enough. When I stand up on the pegs, I'm hunched over like the proverbial monkey fvcking a football. I need bar height, and I need it now. With taking the kids to the supercross all day tomorrow and a full Sunday, it will take me a few days to install and post pics of the new orange goodies. :thumb
    #87
  8. craigincali

    craigincali I'll try it.

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    Hey loaded,
    Do you just do the under the bar mount or do you provide the "post" too?
    #88
  9. SoilSampleDave

    SoilSampleDave Dr. Zaius was right!

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    Well, the Emig Racing damper with the all-important under the bar mount is finally installed. It was a complete PITA, even with the help of Potatoho's excellent instructions (although slightly different for regular LC4, not ADV). Emig really doesn't provide much info. For comparo, I put a BRP clamp and mounts on another bike a few months ago and it was simple and quick. This was a struggle to get things to align up. I don't know how much was just the nature of the ADV and how much was the nature of the way Emig makes stuff, but I have to tell ya', I'm going to have to start taking my bike in for service or sell it.

    The finished product is very cool. The mounts add 1 and 3/4 inches in height!!! Plus a little forward shift that I forgot to measure.
    [​IMG]

    Looks very schweet on the bike. I was able to slide the throttle cables over to the right side of the backbone so they fit fine, the only problem is the decompressor cable. I will have to disconnect it until I can find a longer one. Anyone know of a source for longer one???
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #89
  10. Surly

    Surly surly adventurer

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    amen to that :thumb
    #90
  11. PASSMORE

    PASSMORE Just the last name...

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    I had the same issues with my decomp cable when I put Loaded risers on. I kept jigger'in (technical term :D ) with it till I found a route that worked :nod However, I had contacted Casey Monahan (Casey@motionpro.com) at Motion Pro and he said they could do a custom set-up for not a lot of scratch ($30ish IIRC) :thumb He said they did not have an oem sample there to play with so you would either have to send yours or give them the following;

    Custom Cable Drawing Requirements:

    1. Housing length (with in-line adjuster fully turned if the cable has one)
    2. Free length
    3. Inner cable diameter
    4. Inner cable bottom fitting (ball or barrel and dimensions)
    5. Inner cable top fitting (ball or barrel and dimensions)
    6. Housing outer diameter
    7. Housing in-line adjuster: Yes or No? If Yes, length of useable travel and specify location (distance from top of housing)
    8. Housing bottom fitting type (straight or angled, if angled specify degree of bend) thread diameter and pitch
    9. Housing top fitting type (straight or angled, if angled specify degree of bend) thread diameter and pitch


    Either way, it was about a 7 day turn around. Hope this helps and the Emig piece looks fantastic :nod Might have to get one myself if Loaded doesnt get off his ass :whip :lol3
    #91
  12. potatoho

    potatoho Cheese and Rice!

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    Cool. Let me know what you had problems with. I kinda typed those from memory.

    I didn't have a problem with the decompressor cable. I wonder if they're different. I just looked at mine, and I have it routed along top, then between the dash and top clamp, then along the right side of the steering head. You can see it in my earlier pictures.

    I was just checking a catalog to see if my decomp cable was longer. I can't find a listed measurement for my particular cable 58302094000. I've seen that later years are using 58302094200 which is listed as 693.5 length. I wonder if my cable is slightly longer.
    #92
  13. potatoho

    potatoho Cheese and Rice!

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    Oh ok, I found a chart on the ktm-info.com 1998 ADV handlebar instruments sheet. 58302094000 which is older, is 805 length. 58302094200 is 693.5 length. Look at the 1998 ADV parts and you see that it is using 58302094000 just like me, and after that they went to the shorter 58302094200.

    Part is $14.68.
    #93
  14. SoilSampleDave

    SoilSampleDave Dr. Zaius was right!

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    Excellent detective work. I'll get one ordered up!:thumb
    #94
  15. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

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    theres a pretty good chance loaded will have an emig one soon so i don't expect you to wait til i get off my ass if i aint.
    #95
  16. creeper

    creeper Still alive...

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    Loaded always worth waiting for, he is.
    #96
  17. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    HEY!!! leave that attitude in the vendor forum loadedoncetoooften :mrskbasa

    i think he was lookin for the info you just posted, but with some good humor... :vardy
    #97
  18. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

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    i love you? :cry
    #98
  19. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    aye. have a kokanee for me! :freaky
    #99
  20. potatoho

    potatoho Cheese and Rice!

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    I wanted to add this as an attachment or make a link, but I couldn't figure it out. Hope it helps, and maybe someone should add particulars for the ADV as I don't have one.

    Chris' emig stabilizer installation instructions

    Included in kit:

    - 12mm bolts with extra washers (don't use)
    - Clamps w/ bolts
    - Skinnier bearing dust cap
    - Stabilizer w/ bolts
    - Bolt-on tower w/ bolt

    Tools you need:

    - 32mm or 1-1/4" socket for steering stem nut.
    - Torque wrench.
    - Set of metric allen heads. I use a socket set I got at Lowe's. You will
    need the 10mm allen wrench to tighten the 12mm clamp bolts to 45ftlbs.
    - Anti-sieze.
    - Small hacksaw or dremel cutoff to take some metal away from your steering
    lock.
    - 12mm drill bit to drill out the OEM washers.
    - Some kite string to help center the tower.
    - Auto goop to tack down cables and help with fatigue. I use it
    strategically since my cables are somewhat tight due to a carb with the
    throttle on the wrong side.
    - Calipers so you can verify heights etc.
    - Kliklamp or similar hand-clamp.

    1. Inspect the parts for metal shavings in the holes. Pick out anything you don't like :-)

    2. Put bike on center stand. Can't really do it properly without the bike sitting up straight.

    3. Put a strap through front wheel and up over top of the frame. Tighten it down to at least get a couple of inches of compression on the forks. This is to keep the front end from falling out of the steering head when you remove the top triple clamp and steering stem nut. There will be enough gap between the stabilizer tower clamp and the frame, to get rid of the strap later.

    4. Remove headlamp and set it aside. This is to make it easier to get to the dash bolts which attach from the underside to the top triple clamp. On my 640 LC4, there are three such bolts. Remove these small bolts which attach the dash to the top triple clamp. On my 640 LC4 they are each a different length, so I labeled on them with a sharpie.

    5. Take some measurements. For example, if you have your forks raised in the triple clamps, make sure you mark down how many millimeters they are sticking above flush.

    6. Take off the bars. Even if you are keeping your bars, you'll pretty much want to remove everything and separate it from the bike. This is because you will ultimately assemble the pieces on your carpeted floor to make it easier to align things and torque.

    7. Take off the stock bar clamps. Not sure on the Adventure. On my 640 LC4 I need to remove the bar clamps to fit a socket on the steering stem nut.

    8. Loosen the four top triple clamp pinch bolts, and the steering stem nut pinch bolt. Loosen them a lot, like maybe 1/4" out, as they like to work themselves tight again through some kind of mystery force. Actually, take the steering stem nut pinch bolt out completely and set it aside. This will help you later when you install so you don't accidentally mash it into your new tower.

    9. Use the 1-1/4" or 32mm socket to remove the steering stem nut. It's not very tight. It's supposed to only be on snug, like the way it is on a bicycle. The pinch bolt keeps it stable.

    10. At this point you can lift the top triple clamp off the fork legs. Maybe it will just slide right off. On mine I use a rubber mallet and wood dowel and tap each side up 1/8" at a time. If it's not coming off, look underneath and make sure you didn't miss any dash mounts.

    11. The only thing remaining on my 640 LC4 was to disconnect the ignition switch wiring. Easiest to remove the two phillips head screws. Then the top triple clamp should be separate from the bike.

    12. Now you have two things to do. You have to assemble the stabilizer to the top triple clamp, and you have to install the bolt-on tower clamp to the steering head.

    13. Let's tackle the bolt-on tower first. Essentially it will slide onto the steering head and you tighten it down. The two issues.. 1) the LC4 has poor clearance between the steering head and the clamp bolts which will be hanging down, and 2) the LC4 has a square steering lock receptacle welded at the back of the steering head. What you are interested in, is having the tower clamp inner-surface be level with the outer most ring of the steering stem. You may be >this close< to having it fit, but really, it's not going to without a little cutting. On my 640 LC4 I had to remove 1/8" off the top of the steering lock. You can just hack it off, or grind it off. Myself, I kept a lot of the square material and just ground away what I needed.

    14. Okay so step 13 was grinding away some of the steering lock. Now check if the tower clamp can fit level. With that steering lock out of the way, you can probably scoot it down quite a bit. Don't do that though. Like I said, emig has measured the rest of the parts so that the tower clamp is positioned with the inner-surface level with the outer most ring of the steering stem. The other parts require this, for example the shorter bearing cover, and also notice the cut-out area of the tower. The cut-out area of the tower is to allow your steering stem pinch bolt to clear. If you were to place your tower too high or too low, then the steering stem pinch bolt wouldn't like up with the cutout. On my 640 LC4, I had to mount the tower just "slightly" above where I have mentioned. Like maybe 1/32" higher.

    15. Here's a trick to center the tower. Take some kite string and anchor it to your gas tank bolt. Then stretch the string over top of the steering stem hole and use it as a centerline for your tower. Once you have it centered and level, tighten it down to 14ftlb.

    16. While you can see the steering stem bearings might as well inject some water proof grease in thar. At least that's what I did.

    17. Now to assembling the rest. Take apart the OEM rubber etc from the triple clamp. Throw out the metal tubes in the middle. Drill the 4 OEM washers out to 12mm to fit the emig bolts.

    18. It goes like this. Use the holes on the clamps labeled "KTM". Put the rubbers back into the triple clamp, again, without the OEM tubes. Put anti-sieze on the 12mm bolts. Install the clamps onto the triple clamp using the 12mm bolts *and* the OEM washers and rubbers. This is important. If your kit came with extra washers, basically just chuck them. You cannot have an extra washer (beyond the OEM) on the underside as there will be no clearance. Don't torque things yet as you need to line stuff up still. Seriously, you MUST USE THE OEM WASHERS (drilled to 12mm).

    19. This is another important step. Okay so you've got the clamps loosely bolted onto the triple clamp. Now what you want to do is test fit the stabilizer and bars. I had to use the stabilizer holes closest to the rider. Mount the stabilizer to the clamps with it far enough forward so it doesn't hit the bars. The final position on my bike is approximately centered within the slot using the closest holes. Keep in mind that this is only temporary as you'll be removing this later in the installation process, so don't spend too much time. The purpose of test fitting is to get all holes lined up so you can torque the clamps down.

    20. So now you have hand-tightened the clamps to the triple clamp. And you have attached the stabilizer and tightened it down so it won't move. Emig says 8 or 9 ft lbs. Seems like a lot. I just snug it tight with a regular allen wrench. Now add the handlebars, and tighten their clamps to the usual 20Nm.

    21. Everything being straight, level whatnot. You can now finally tighten the clamps to the triple clamp. Here's the scoop. The bottom OEM washers have cutouts on two sides. These cutouts are to leave room for the bearing cover once you put everything together. So what you need to do is, as you are tightening, make sure that a bearing cover will fit flush. In other words, take the bearing cover and periodically make sure that it lines up with the OEM washer cutouts as you are tightening. On mine, I had to use some vise grips to hold the OEM washers to keep them from spinning as I torqued. Torque is 45 ft lbs. YES, 45 ft lbs. That's why you bought the Lowe's socket allen head set.

    22. Bars straight.. check. Stabilizer holes lined up with stabilizer slots.. check. Bearing dust cover fits flush while centered on the underside of the triple clamp.. check. 12mm bolts torqued to 45 lb lbs.. check. Put rubber seal and bearing dust cover on steering stem.. check.

    23. Ready for final assembly! Remove the stabilizer, it will just get in the way. Don't worry about centering on pivot points etc, that is easy later. Bring your setup over to the bike and put it back together. You are going to want your steering cocked to the right when you get close. This is because otherwise the steering stem nut pinch area is going to hit the tower. See it has to be down at least a certain level to match the cutout in the tower. Notice also that the tower is adjustable in its position, though I left mine in the stock position which leaves very little clearance with the pinch area.

    Don't forget to attach the ignition via the phillips screws first. That would be a pain to install later.

    24. Remember, your stabilizer is off. You'll put that on last, as you still have some stuff to do. So get your top triple clamp in place and the fork leg heights the same as you measured in step 5.

    25. Stem nut pinch area matches tower cutout.. check. If it doesn't then you'll have to a) disassemble and change the height of your tower clamp, or b) move the tower further away in it's slot. Fork leg height is same as before.. check. Steering doesn't bind.. check.

    The bearing dust cap should still kinda freewheel at this point. If you aligned the bottom OEM clamp washers properly, they will be straddling the bearing dust cap. If you didn't, then well, your bearing dust cap will be warped and you'll have to disassemble and pound it flat (with your 1-1/4" socket) and try over. Been there, done that.

    26. Put a little anti-sieze on the steering stem nut and install it. It should be tightened until "snug". The benchmark I use is I tighten it until the bearing dust cap gets snug.

    27. You may now tighten all the top triple clamp pinch bolts to 20Nm. If everything checks out, you can also get rid of the strap holding the front end. Read the tricks at the bottom for how to fine-tune the alignment holes once you are done.

    28. Check range of motion and binding. On my 640 LC4 there were three dash attachment areas. Important. The center attachment mustn't be used as it will run directly into the tower clamp at the rear. Furthermore, if you don't actually snip off the plastic dash leg, it will rub against the tower clamp at certain portions and hinder your steering. So get a flashlight and run though the whole range of motion and be certain that nothing is rubbing or hitting the rear of the tower clamp.

    29. The only thing remaining is the installation of the stabilizer. Put the pin in the tower. The o-ring can be moved around to give you proper height. The pin doesn't actually spin around during usage so lube isn't all that important. I put a little grease on mine though.

    30. The pivot point of the stabilizer is easy to find. Basically it is the point at which the pin remains stationary as you turn your steering. So attach the stabilizer, perhaps centered in the slot, snug it down a bit, and turn the steering and watch the pin to see if it moves in the slot. Mount the stabilizer so that the pin stays in the same place as you turn your steering, and you have found the proper pivot point!

    31. So everything is together. The rest would just be making sure your cables don't bind anywhere once the tank is attached. My throttle cables just barely reached. There are now some tight crevises created between the tower and tank, so I used goop to attach my throttle cables at strategic places so they wouldn't get stuck somewhere. Also to keep them from chafing. Goop is great, because it is completely removable from non-pourous materials by twisting it up using needle nose pliers (once it's dry!). Though you have to let it cure overnight, which sucks.

    In addition I used some zip ties as cable guides to keep them from snagging on my bar pad.

    Tricks:

    1. You may find that after torqueing everything down, that the stabilizer mounting holes aren't >perfectly< aligned.. don't you hate that. DON'T FORCE ANY BOLTS. What you can do is very simple. It's the rubber mounts that makes them funky, but they can be easily finessed. Loosen one or both handlebar clamps (the top part only), and then use one of those hand-clamp things to tweak the alignment of the clamps such that the stabilizer holes are perfectly aligned. With it still hand-clamped, tighten your handlebar clamps again. Now you can remove the hand-clamp and it will stay aligned! The hand-clamp I got at Lowe's. Not the normal kind, instead I got one called a kliklamp because it was cheaper (on sale) and has some leverage.