790/890 Adventure / R / Rally owners, show yours!

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by a.c.e., Apr 17, 2019.

  1. isjustus4

    isjustus4 Been here awhile

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    It’s a Garmin 66i with inreach functions. The XT is for navigating for the screen size, the 66i is backup maps in case of failure because I wouldn’t want to have to navigate from that small screen. It’s really just there for satellite messaging/sos, but I liked the mapping function over a Inreach mini.
  2. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist Supporter

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    If it's for the SOS features, then we need to encourage you to wear that device on your person. One good tumble off the bike, and disabled in some regard and there will be no SOS. Unless you have that linked to a cell in your pocket, like my Inreach Mini, and can use the cell to send SOS alerts. But try never to leave something as precious as an SOS device 'on' the bike. Have it on your person instead so you never have to think about it - whether off for a piss, out on a hike, or ass over tea kettle down a ravine with a broken leg.


    Link back to my original post on the subject: https://advrider.com/f/threads/ktm-...s-and-upgrades.1364732/page-252#post-39653623
    goodquest, RyanC, EvilSteve and 2 others like this.
  3. GeoAggie

    GeoAggie Adventurer Supporter

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  4. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

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    What is the effective range of the linking?
  5. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist Supporter

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    I believe it is a BT link, so pick yer poison as far as believing what range that may amount to. It used to be 30 feet, but now you see figures far higher such as 30 METRES in a building, but as much as 200M line of sight. Maybe this is based on the latest BT tech, as well as higher wattage antennas, I dunno.
  6. Brage

    Brage Mechanic

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    Totally agree, as with your smartphone. Keep it on your body.
    In our country we have an App down loaded for emergency, that when used they immediately get your longitude latitude pos. Its supposed to work even when out of reach for normal phone activites.

    Kindly regards Brage
  7. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

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    Right. What i’m hearing is: don’t rely on it if you get violently separated from the bike. :) Scrub and rock walls will be a major impediment even for relatively short distances .
    TrailTrauma likes this.
  8. isjustus4

    isjustus4 Been here awhile

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    Good advice. Yes, it is linked to a cell that is in my pocket. I decided that when not riding solo to keep it charged in a cradle on the bars. Would be a small chance that I crashed and a riding partner couldn’t get to the Inreach unit, but yes, it could be a possibility.
  9. kubcat

    kubcat Riding is Eudaemonic Supporter

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    The point of the inreach units is to be self-reliant (with the help of the USCG, of course) in case of emergency in the backcountry. Setting up a scenario where you are still reliant on someone else to activate it seems to be defeating the purpose, although I agree the odds of that scenario happening are low (going over the edge of a mountain pass and coming to rest hundreds of feet below your companions, with no bike in sight). Since I agree the best scenario is to have it on you, that would pretty much defeat the real-time nav capability. Its really intended for use while hiking or backpacking, where you would only periodically stop and check coordinates, then continue on. Of course you would always have it with you under that scenario, provided you have it clipped to you, and not the backpack, which could get separated from you in fall just like the biking scenario. For motorcycle or ATV travel, most people go with the mini. In my case, I used the money I saved by not getting a combination SOS/Nav unit to buy a dedicated nav unit mounted to my bike for backup, in addition to my primary nav tablet.
  10. EvilSteve

    EvilSteve Not so evil, not so Steve. Supporter

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    I keep my inReach Mini on my backpack that I always wear when I’m riding. I make sure I can reach the SOS button with both arms. I use my phone linked to the device to send messages and do any navigation.

    I’ve been considering getting a Zumo XT but I have bad memories of old GPS devices becoming useless once the company stop supporting them.
  11. isjustus4

    isjustus4 Been here awhile

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    @kubkat

    Sure, the idea may be to be self reliant, and in that situation may require a different thought process on carrying it. However, if traveling with a partner, or as a group meets my needs and wants as is. Solo would be a different story where it would reside in the interior chest pocket of my jacket, or potentially a d-ring on a belt loop if riding in a jersey.

    SOS function aside, there is always a backup plan of having family able to locate me, if something went bad. I don’t wear a backpack to have the option to mount it to a strap. In any form, it is there as a backup plan which is better than not having one at all. Just hope to never need it….

    As a geocacher, a mini wouldn’t suit my needs for traveling when not in use on the bike. Thus the topo mapping option of the 66i. Would probably have a 700i if it was available when I bought the unit. Multi use product, not just for motorcycle reasons.
  12. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    Whether on your person or on the bike having a locator is likely going to be better if you need it than not having one in remote terrain. Either choice carries some advantages and disadvantages. I do multi-day rides so having it on my person at all times is not an option. I'd rather have a charged unit in my tank bag than a dead one in my pocket and do not like to try to charge things overnight in camp while the bike is turned off. There is also a greater chance that the unit itself may get damaged (or damage you) if you are carrying it on your person and you have a get-off. On the other hand as has been mentioned it's usefulness is limited or non-existent if you can't reach it and have to rely on someone at home noticing your pings have not moved for an extended period of time, or worse you didn't have the auto-ping enabled AND you can't reach it.

    Like any other part of traveling in remote terrain there are hazards to consider and weigh. Solo or not. How many tools to carry or not. Take that sketchy looking route or not. Try to make the next gas station or not. Tubeless or tubes. Winch, block and tackle, or rely on ones strength? It's an endless list of decision making with potentially serious consequences. It's all not as fun unless there's skin in the game.

    More photos of interesting places to see and ride. I've got an itch.
  13. KreechTM

    KreechTM Dirt Biker

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    Woodford, VT area yesterday.

    Woodford VT COPY.jpg
  14. jojojones

    jojojones Long timer Supporter

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    that’s my winter stomping ground. Was somebody putting wheels where wheels were not supposed to go? (wink wink)
  15. KreechTM

    KreechTM Dirt Biker

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    No it's a Class IV. It was late in the day and didn't want to put my wheel in that 2' deep hole. Took me 10 min to turn around LOL. Water is flowing very fast everywhere I usually ride.
  16. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    I think I may have to have another go at those VT class 4's late this summer or early fall. It was a blast to ride up there earlier this year.
  17. jojojones

    jojojones Long timer Supporter

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    If you haven’t already definitely check out the abandoned radar station up north.
  18. offworlder

    offworlder Been here awhile

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    Hanging out with (the new owner of) my old bike and my new bike:
    Family.jpg
  19. Cam

    Cam Long timer

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    I thought the graphic of the first bike in the pic above looked like someone misspelled Ikea as Kiea.
    EvilSteve likes this.
  20. offworlder

    offworlder Been here awhile

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